Taking a job in an anti-Catholic country
#41
Going to Saudi Arabia is problematic. You can risk being jailed (and you REALLY don't want to go to jail in the Middle East),  for having a bible, or a rosary or even a holy card. If you go to one of the underground Masses you might be caught. The religious police are spying all the time and don't think that your bedroom isnt' being searched while you're at work. The money is great and you can make enough in two years to come home and buy a house with cash but don't do it unless you are single because life in the Sand Box has been known to make American women break down.
Reply
#42
(07-31-2011, 09:44 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote: It's news to me that they don't allow crucifixes in the Embassy.  Seems strange in this sense that when the Islamists were in power in the ME for centuries, that Christians did a lot better there than they are doing now. Now they're fleeing in droves.

Yeah, but you have to consider that the Wahhabism that has taken root in Saudi Arabia is a relatively recent development in the Islamic world. When we westerners think of fanatical Islam, we are typically thinking of Wahhabism. The Wahhabists are so fanatical that they are looked upon with disgust by most of their co-religionists.  My childhood Muslim friends, who are Shia, refer to Wahhabis as scum.
Reply
#43
(08-03-2011, 12:06 PM)dymphnaw Wrote: ...life in the Sand Box has been known to make American women break down.

I've heard that's only if the women are not living in one of the "camps" that are set up by the employers. Those are no different than Main Street, U.S.A, I hear. If a woman's husband is not with a large company, then she'll be stuck inside all day, which some people wouldn't like.
Reply
#44
I have an uncle who was arrested by the Saudi religious police because someone reported he wore a rosary ring once, and in private. Luckily he knew the right people and was promptly released; but the simple fact is that it is very dangerous to be a Christian in Saudi Arabia. They still don't allow non-Muslims to enter Mecca or Medina, I believe, and to go against this rule carries quite a severe punishment.
Reply
#45
(08-03-2011, 12:40 PM)Matamoros Wrote: I have an uncle who was arrested by the Saudi religious police because someone reported he wore a rosary ring once, and in private. Luckily he knew the right people and was promptly released; but the simple fact is that it is very dangerous to be a Christian in Saudi Arabia.

Wow! That's scary.

Thank goodness the Arabs are corrupt as hell.
Reply
#46
(08-03-2011, 12:11 PM)rbjmartin Wrote:
(07-31-2011, 09:44 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote: It's news to me that they don't allow crucifixes in the Embassy.  Seems strange in this sense that when the Islamists were in power in the ME for centuries, that Christians did a lot better there than they are doing now. Now they're fleeing in droves.

Yeah, but you have to consider that the Wahhabism that has taken root in Saudi Arabia is a relatively recent development in the Islamic world. When we westerners think of fanatical Islam, we are typically thinking of Wahhabism. The Wahhabists are so fanatical that they are looked upon with disgust by most of their co-religionists.  My childhood Muslim friends, who are Shia, refer to Wahhabis as scum.

Yes, I've heard of these nuts from a Moselm friend of mine as well who also shared a profound contempt for them (and Saudis in general). Apparently Wahhabis have even gone as far as to knowingly destroy ancient, historic buildings, mosques and homes related to either Mohammed, his mother, wives, children or historical Islamic figures so as to prevent veneration of the people associated with the sites lest they fall into idolatry. Pretty bizarre.
Reply
#47
(08-03-2011, 12:11 PM)rbjmartin Wrote:
(07-31-2011, 09:44 AM)Augstine Baker Wrote: It's news to me that they don't allow crucifixes in the Embassy.  Seems strange in this sense that when the Islamists were in power in the ME for centuries, that Christians did a lot better there than they are doing now. Now they're fleeing in droves.

Yeah, but you have to consider that the Wahhabism that has taken root in Saudi Arabia is a relatively recent development in the Islamic world. When we westerners think of fanatical Islam, we are typically thinking of Wahhabism. The Wahhabists are so fanatical that they are looked upon with disgust by most of their co-religionists.  My childhood Muslim friends, who are Shia, refer to Wahhabis as scum.
We should also understand that having women soldiers on sacred Saudi soil, near Muslim holy sites lead to 9/11. Osama bin Laden saw this as America sending its 'temple prostitutes' to defend the unmanly rulers of Arabia.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)