Why Do Trad Chapels Have Pews?
#71
(08-10-2011, 01:41 PM)JoniCath Wrote:
(08-08-2011, 03:45 PM)maldon Wrote: I don't know about you all, but those Russian pix took my breath away. . .
SAME HERE! Was  that a  Russian Orthodox Church? SSPX?? I'd have to attend Mass twice a day if I went there......once to pray the Mass & once just to sit & glory in the beauty. WOW!

It was a Russian Orthodox Church. They build beautiful churches in Russia.
Reply
#72
(08-10-2011, 01:10 PM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-09-2011, 11:27 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: St. Michael's Russian Catholic in NYC does not have pews, but does have some chairs/benches at the back and sides of the church for older folks.

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Cathedral in NYC also does not have pews.

I'm guessing you've been to St. Michaels? how was it?

I've never been to a Russian Divine Liturgy but I want to.

Nothing beats the Good Friday service at Eastern Rite.  sad
Reply
#73
(08-10-2011, 01:10 PM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-09-2011, 11:27 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: St. Michael's Russian Catholic in NYC does not have pews, but does have some chairs/benches at the back and sides of the church for older folks.

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Cathedral in NYC also does not have pews.

I'm guessing you've been to St. Michaels? how was it?

I've never been to a Russian Divine Liturgy but I want to.

You may be disappointed. I went to St. Nicholas Cathedral in Washington, DC once, back in 2000. People milled around and socialized during the liturgy. The polite ones go outside to smoke. But you may find they are not all polite. No pews either. The pews might help them focus on the liturgy but since that is all happening behind a screen anyway I'm not sure it matters. I wasn't surprised as I had been warned that the behavior I have described was typical of a Russian orthodox congregation.


C.
Reply
#74
(08-10-2011, 09:15 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(08-10-2011, 01:10 PM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-09-2011, 11:27 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: St. Michael's Russian Catholic in NYC does not have pews, but does have some chairs/benches at the back and sides of the church for older folks.

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Cathedral in NYC also does not have pews.

I'm guessing you've been to St. Michaels? how was it?

I've never been to a Russian Divine Liturgy but I want to.

You may be disappointed. I went to St. Nicholas Cathedral in Washington, DC once, back in 2000. People milled around and socialized during the liturgy. The polite ones go outside to smoke. But you may find they are not all polite. No pews either. The pews might help them focus on the liturgy but since that is all happening behind a screen anyway I'm not sure it matters. I wasn't surprised as I had been warned that the behavior I have described was typical of a Russian orthodox congregation.


C.

I attended a Russian Orthodox service in Moscow in 1989.  Only for about 5 minutes, as I felt like the intruder I was.  All standees, except for one man who was repeatedly standing, kneeling, and then prostrating himself.  The building itself was rather bare - at that time, the only churches with any beauty left were used as museum showpieces.  Odd thing, too, which I will never know the answer to.......on my way out a babushka turned and said to me, "ymnie ykhodit".....in Russian, "the wise will leave".  I still wonder about that to this day.
Reply
#75
(08-10-2011, 09:15 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(08-10-2011, 01:10 PM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-09-2011, 11:27 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: St. Michael's Russian Catholic in NYC does not have pews, but does have some chairs/benches at the back and sides of the church for older folks.

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Cathedral in NYC also does not have pews.

I'm guessing you've been to St. Michaels? how was it?

I've never been to a Russian Divine Liturgy but I want to.

You may be disappointed. I went to St. Nicholas Cathedral in Washington, DC once, back in 2000. People milled around and socialized during the liturgy. The polite ones go outside to smoke. But you may find they are not all polite. No pews either. The pews might help them focus on the liturgy but since that is all happening behind a screen anyway I'm not sure it matters. I wasn't surprised as I had been warned that the behavior I have described was typical of a Russian orthodox congregation.


C.

Typical of Easterners on the whole I believe. If you are going to a Divine Liturgy in order to find reverent silence, you may be disappointed. It is not at all untypical for people to show up late as a rule. Equally distracting can be the constant moving and walking around: people reverencing icons or lighting candles while the deacon is intoning a litany in front of the Royal Doors, etc.

I find it ironic that the East stresses such stillness and silence when it comes to private prayer but their Liturgies can sometimes resemble Penn Station at rush hour. I'll take the reverent silence of the TLM any day. I have attended Saturday Night Vespers before and found it a slight departure from the Divine Liturgy. There are typically less people and the service is a bit quieter.
Reply
#76
(08-13-2011, 02:27 PM)username123 Wrote: Typical of Easterners on the whole I believe. If you are going to a Divine Liturgy in order to find reverent silence, you may be disappointed. It is not at all untypical for people to show up late as a rule. Equally distracting can be the constant moving and walking around: people reverencing icons or lighting candles while the deacon is intoning a litany in front of the Royal Doors, etc.

I find it ironic that the East stresses such stillness and silence when it comes to private prayer but their Liturgies can sometimes resemble Penn Station at rush hour. I'll take the reverent silence of the TLM any day. I have attended Saturday Night Vespers before and found it a slight departure from the Divine Liturgy. There are typically less people and the service is a bit quieter.

Yeah that's true from what I noticed too, many people show up late and are kissing all the icons and lighting candles 35 minutes into the liturgy.

But when I attended vespers there was never more then 3 other people present so it wasn't a problem.

I wish we had Saturday night Vespers sung in the Church in the Latin rite instead of that Anticipated Novus Ordo mass...
Reply
#77
(08-13-2011, 02:27 PM)username123 Wrote: . If you are going to a Divine Liturgy in order to find reverent silence, you may be disappointed. It is not at all untypical for people to show up late as a rule. Equally distracting can be the constant moving and walking around: people reverencing icons or lighting candles while the deacon is intoning a litany in front of the Royal Doors, etc. I find it ironic that the East stresses such stillness and silence when it comes to private prayer but their Liturgies can sometimes resemble Penn Station at rush hour.

Yes, that's what I heard too. Especially the part about people walking around reverencing icons and lighting candles. I understand the liturgies are very long and people basically "do their own thing." Plus they have no pews to sit down on.  LOL 
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)