sacrament name
#11
(08-08-2011, 05:22 PM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-08-2011, 05:18 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(08-08-2011, 05:17 PM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-08-2011, 05:07 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: It must be said that there's nothing intrinsically wrong with the name "reconciliation" since that's the fruit of the sacrament: you are reconciled with God.

I personally prefer confession to sum it up.

What have the Portuguese historically referred to the sacrament as?

Confession or Penance.

I was wondering what the Portuguese words were!

Ah, sorry.

Confissão ou Penitência.
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#12
I see. Thank you.

Also, could you tell me which of Aristotle's works the quote in your signature comes from?
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#13
Reconciliation sounds like: OK ......let's see if we can reconcile this situation.

Penance sounds like: mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa!!
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#14
(08-08-2011, 05:26 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: I see. Thank you.

Also, could you tell me which of Aristotle's works the quote in your signature comes from?

I don't know. It's a matter of looking it up.

I took it from one of Aristotle's quotations sites.
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#15
(08-08-2011, 05:31 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(08-08-2011, 05:26 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: I see. Thank you.

Also, could you tell me which of Aristotle's works the quote in your signature comes from?

I don't know. It's a matter of looking it up.

I've been doing so and thus far cannot find a citation.
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#16
(08-08-2011, 04:21 PM)fatiam13 Wrote: I seem NOT to recall St. Michael the Archangel, in the Fatima vision, shouting to the people on earth Reconciliation, Reconcilation, Reconciliation.

Indeed. But the Bible refers to the sacrament as reconciliation.

II Corinthians 5:18-19 Wrote:But all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Christ; and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation. For God indeed was in Christ, reconciling the world to himself, not imputing to them their sins; and he hath placed in us the word of reconciliation.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with that term.
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#17
(08-08-2011, 07:24 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: Indeed. But the Bible refers to the sacrament as reconciliation.

II Corinthians 5:18-19 Wrote:But all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Christ; and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation. For God indeed was in Christ, reconciling the world to himself, not imputing to them their sins; and he hath placed in us the word of reconciliation.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with that term.

Word.

God's word.
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#18
(08-08-2011, 07:24 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(08-08-2011, 04:21 PM)fatiam13 Wrote: I seem NOT to recall St. Michael the Archangel, in the Fatima vision, shouting to the people on earth Reconciliation, Reconcilation, Reconciliation.

Indeed. But the Bible refers to the sacrament as reconciliation.

II Corinthians 5:18-19 Wrote:But all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Christ; and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation. For God indeed was in Christ, reconciling the world to himself, not imputing to them their sins; and he hath placed in us the word of reconciliation.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with that term.

Are you sure that this specific passage is referring to the sacrament in particular, as opposed to "reconciliation" more generally?
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#19
(08-08-2011, 07:28 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: Are you sure that this specific passage is referring to the sacrament in particular, as opposed to "reconciliation" more generally?

I suppose it could be either. But the verse that immediately follows those two adds some context:

Quote:For Christ therefore we are ambassadors, God as it were exhorting by us. For Christ, we beseech you, be reconciled to God.

"We", being the early leaders or bishops of the Church, are speaking to the faithful about the gift entrusted by Christ to them. Sounds like what we today would refer to as the sacrament of penance.
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#20
(08-08-2011, 07:31 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(08-08-2011, 07:28 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: Are you sure that this specific passage is referring to the sacrament in particular, as opposed to "reconciliation" more generally?

I suppose it could be either. But the following verse that immediately follows those two adds some context:

Quote:For Christ therefore we are ambassadors, God as it were exhorting by us. For Christ, we beseech you, be reconciled to God.

"We", being the early leaders or bishops of the Church, are speaking to the faithful about the gift entrusted by Christ to them. Sounds like what we today would refer to as the sacrament of penance.

That makes sense. I guess I just hadn't seen it referenced as one of the conventional scriptural citations for the sacrament of Penance. The primary ones I'd heard before were "Whose sins you forgive are forgiven" and "Confess your sins to one another."
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