announcements at Mass.
#21
(08-17-2011, 09:41 PM)OldMan Wrote: While a sermon is prescribed it is not a part of the traditional Mass. So technically, it is an interruption of the Holy Sacrifice (which by the way is allowed). The announcements have traditionally been made before the Epistle and Gospel are read. Additionally, the celebrant is not strictly required to read the Epistle and Gospel in the vernacular as most people have missals and can follow if they wish. Why have a hang-up about something so unimportant? These days it's a miracle if you even have a real Mass to attend!

Indeed!  If you have access to a TLM, be thankful.  Many of us don't have one.


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#22
I actually prefer it when the priest does not read the epistle and Gospel in the vernacular or give a sermon, It breaks up the Mass.
Many FSSP priests do not give sermons, as I have experienced.
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#23
(08-18-2011, 01:51 PM)dan hunter Wrote: Many FSSP priests do not give sermons, as I have experienced.

Wow! The ones I know always give a sermon. A 'real' one on Sundays and Holy Days and at least a few words about the Saint of the day or the season at daily Mass.
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#24
(08-18-2011, 03:45 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-18-2011, 01:51 PM)dan hunter Wrote: Many FSSP priests do not give sermons, as I have experienced.

Wow! The ones I know always give a sermon. A 'real' one on Sundays and Holy Days and at least a few words about the Saint of the day or the season at daily Mass.
I should have not said many.
I have been to Mass to three different FSSP priests on Sundays and Holy days and they have not said sermons, probably because it was a private Mass.
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#25
(08-17-2011, 12:45 AM)InfinityCodaLMHSYF Wrote: Does anyone else feel that when a priest reads the 'church announcements' right before he reads the epistles he is interrupting the Mass and perhaps announcements should be read before Mass (or whenever most practical)?

No. It seems logical. The Mass is on hold at that point, and your priest should remove his maniple before he goes to the pulpit. Plus before Mass the priest is busy with confessions, and then vesting, and people are still coming in. Right in the middle is the sweet spot to get your captive audience, hence the sermon also.
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#26
In this era when soo many Catholics are uncatechized a sermon is no more a luxury but a need to feed souls solid food!
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#27
Ours are at the end, just before the final blessing.  Seems to not be too intrusive.  But why not just put 'em all in the dang bulletin?
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#28
(08-18-2011, 07:35 PM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: Ours are at the end, just before the final blessing.  Seems to not be too intrusive.  But why not just put 'em all in the dang bulletin?

Because many people are too lazy to pick up a bulletin and actually read it! :)
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#29
(08-18-2011, 07:40 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-18-2011, 07:35 PM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: Ours are at the end, just before the final blessing.  Seems to not be too intrusive.  But why not just put 'em all in the dang bulletin?

Because many people are too lazy to pick up a bulletin and actually read it! :)

Typical of the average person today. Now if it was broadcast on a screen...

On the other hand there is a purpose to reading the announcements out loud such as emphasizing the importance of certain feasts, updating information contained in the bulletin (someone may have died or become gravely ill since it went to press...).  Nothing wrong with announcements if they aren't too long or just nonsense (such as birthdays)!
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#30
Good replies everyone.  Fortunately none of the announcements I've heard involved singing happy birthday or whatnot.  Instead reminding us about the social picnic after Mass and to turn your rosary tally sheets in.  Perhaps I am over-reacting, though I find announcements at anytime during the Mass/sermon to be not quit proper.  Though the practibilty side of the issue I can understand, too.

Also, I heard Masses in which the priest gave no sermon.
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