Headcoverings
#11
(08-19-2011, 02:54 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote: Oh dear. I'm afraid I wouldn't have a clue how to sew, much less where to buy the lace!

There is this tool called the Internet.  You can search for "lace suppliers" and "how to use a sewing machine"

If illiterate women in the third world can use a sewing machine how hard can it be?  It is just a square of cloth for goodness sake.  You cut it with a razor blade and a wooden stencil and hem the sides.  That's about it I would guess.

Show a little backbone.  If you sew them yourself your budget will go 5-10 times as far.  More women get their heads covered which is your objective is it not.
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#12
I've never used a sewing machine in my life. I have a feeling using one is a lot like giving someone a hair cut: much more difficult than it looks.

I've also bought rosaries and mantilla's from sacramentals.org and always got great service.
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#13
(08-20-2011, 02:33 AM)ggreg Wrote:
(08-19-2011, 02:54 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote: Oh dear. I'm afraid I wouldn't have a clue how to sew, much less where to buy the lace!

There is this tool called the Internet.  You can search for "lace suppliers" and "how to use a sewing machine"

If illiterate women in the third world can use a sewing machine how hard can it be?  It is just a square of cloth for goodness sake.  You cut it with a razor blade and a wooden stencil and hem the sides.  That's about it I would guess.

Show a little backbone.  If you sew them yourself your budget will go 5-10 times as far.  More women get their heads covered which is your objective is it not.

Insulting people is not an effective tool of communication.

Everyone else, thank you for the recommendations, we'll be well stocked soon. I am writing a brochure to go along with them to explain the practice and its value.
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#14
(08-20-2011, 12:39 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 02:33 AM)ggreg Wrote:
(08-19-2011, 02:54 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote: Oh dear. I'm afraid I wouldn't have a clue how to sew, much less where to buy the lace!

There is this tool called the Internet.  You can search for "lace suppliers" and "how to use a sewing machine"

If illiterate women in the third world can use a sewing machine how hard can it be?  It is just a square of cloth for goodness sake.  You cut it with a razor blade and a wooden stencil and hem the sides.  That's about it I would guess.

Show a little backbone.  If you sew them yourself your budget will go 5-10 times as far.  More women get their heads covered which is your objective is it not.

Insulting people is not an effective tool of communication.

Everyone else, thank you for the recommendations.

ggreg's tone might have been a little rough, but his suggestions are practical and useful.  It's true: if you really want to stretch you budget far, it's worth learning to sew a mantilla.  It's not a complex item (no sleeves, zippers, buttons, bows; just a square cloth essentially).  And it's also true that it's not a specialized profession to sew: in many parts of the world it's just the normal thing to do when something needs sewing -- you don't contract your sewing out to professionals all the time.

So I conclude that just be being able to use the internet and type, you are theoretically capable of sewing.  If you feel like the effort worth learning exceeds the benefits of the money saved, than by all means buy them instead :-).
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#15
Just save the trouble of sewing anything.  You can buy a hat for less.  A headcovering for Mass doesn't HAVE to be a veil.  On the infrequent occasions we get to TLM, Mrs DS just uses a silk scarf.  Some churches will have a basket of small white hankies at the door.....thus an indication that a full veil is not required.

At our parish, Guinean women often attend with brightly colored turban-like headscarves.  Plenty of acceptable options besides white or black lace.
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#16
There's a couple of forum members who advertise on the home page  www.fisheaters.com

They might have some good ideas.
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#17
(08-20-2011, 12:42 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 12:39 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 02:33 AM)ggreg Wrote:
(08-19-2011, 02:54 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote: Oh dear. I'm afraid I wouldn't have a clue how to sew, much less where to buy the lace!

There is this tool called the Internet.  You can search for "lace suppliers" and "how to use a sewing machine"

If illiterate women in the third world can use a sewing machine how hard can it be?  It is just a square of cloth for goodness sake.  You cut it with a razor blade and a wooden stencil and hem the sides.  That's about it I would guess.

Show a little backbone.  If you sew them yourself your budget will go 5-10 times as far.  More women get their heads covered which is your objective is it not.

Insulting people is not an effective tool of communication.

Everyone else, thank you for the recommendations.

ggreg's tone might have been a little rough, but his suggestions are practical and useful.  It's true: if you really want to stretch you budget far, it's worth learning to sew a mantilla.  It's not a complex item (no sleeves, zippers, buttons, bows; just a square cloth essentially).  And it's also true that it's not a specialized profession to sew: in many parts of the world it's just the normal thing to do when something needs sewing -- you don't contract your sewing out to professionals all the time.

So I conclude that just be being able to use the internet and type, you are theoretically capable of sewing.  If you feel like the effort worth learning exceeds the benefits of the money saved, than by all means buy them instead :-).

Some kinds of knowledge are hands-on and simply knowing the theory is not enough.  Have either of these men who are recommending learning to sew ever done it themselves?  Personally, I find sewing very difficult.  It takes a significant investment of time to learn how to do it.  I do not think telling the OP to learn to sew is a practical suggestion at all.
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#18
(08-19-2011, 02:40 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote: Hello,

I am looking for a website or store that has inexpensive mantillas/headcoverings and figured all of you would probably know the best places. I would like to buy a bunch of them to give away for free to any women in our parish who would like to wear them. As you can imagine m parish budget fits inside a thimble so I am trying to be as cost conscious as possible while still paying a fair price for the labor and love that went into them. If you have a favorite shop, please let me know. Thanks!

Might be a good idea to teach them why they are wearing one too.  Here's a little something for that.

Before Vatican II, women were required to wear veils, mantillas, hats, etc. while at Mass. Today few women wear the veil, and many are asking why women should wear veils at all. First and foremost, the 1917 Code of Canon Law stated: "...women, however, should be with head covered and modestly dressed, ..." The new Code of Canon Law from 1983 does not mention the requirement of women to wear veils in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament. However, the absence of a direct reference to the subject does not automatically imply a change of Church teaching. As stated in the 1983 Code of Canon Law, Can. 21: "In doubt, the revocation of a previous law is not presumed; rather, later laws are to be related to earlier ones, as far as possible, harmonized with them."

Women should still wear veils while in the presence of Our Lord in the Eucharist. Why? Even if the Code of Canon Law does not apply, St. Paul's words in 1 Cor. 11:4-6 do still apply:

"Any man who prays or prophesies with his head covered brings shame upon his head. But any woman who prays or prophesies with her head unveiled brings shame upon her head, for it is one and the same thing as if she had had her head shaved. For if a woman does not have her head veiled, she may as well have her hair cut off. But if it is shameful for a woman to have her hair cut off or her head shaved, then she should wear a veil."

http://acatholiclife.blogspot.com/2006/0...veils.html
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#19

You could actually hand sew it if you are uncomfortable with a machine.  Mine is a black lace triangle with a black lace border.  You can make it any length you want.  Also, I use a treadle sewing machine from 1902.  It works great!  Very simple mechanics, very reliable, and not much to break down.  I can't do buttonholes, but I have done them by hand - like they used to do!  When the electricity goes out, you can still sew - by candlelight if you wish - how romantic is thatHuh?
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#20
~whispers conspiratorily~

Solidarity in the Diocese of Lansing!

From, A veil-wearing, NO attending catechist (who can't sew)
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