Headcoverings
#21
do tell us how it turns out, dear!
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#22
(08-20-2011, 05:50 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 12:42 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 12:39 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 02:33 AM)ggreg Wrote:
(08-19-2011, 02:54 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote: Oh dear. I'm afraid I wouldn't have a clue how to sew, much less where to buy the lace!

There is this tool called the Internet.  You can search for "lace suppliers" and "how to use a sewing machine"

If illiterate women in the third world can use a sewing machine how hard can it be?  It is just a square of cloth for goodness sake.  You cut it with a razor blade and a wooden stencil and hem the sides.  That's about it I would guess.

Show a little backbone.  If you sew them yourself your budget will go 5-10 times as far.  More women get their heads covered which is your objective is it not.

Insulting people is not an effective tool of communication.

Everyone else, thank you for the recommendations.

ggreg's tone might have been a little rough, but his suggestions are practical and useful.  It's true: if you really want to stretch you budget far, it's worth learning to sew a mantilla.  It's not a complex item (no sleeves, zippers, buttons, bows; just a square cloth essentially).  And it's also true that it's not a specialized profession to sew: in many parts of the world it's just the normal thing to do when something needs sewing -- you don't contract your sewing out to professionals all the time.

So I conclude that just be being able to use the internet and type, you are theoretically capable of sewing.  If you feel like the effort worth learning exceeds the benefits of the money saved, than by all means buy them instead :-).

Some kinds of knowledge are hands-on and simply knowing the theory is not enough.  Have either of these men who are recommending learning to sew ever done it themselves?  Personally, I find sewing very difficult.  It takes a significant investment of time to learn how to do it.  I do not think telling the OP to learn to sew is a practical suggestion at all.

I've just built a house.  I repair my own car.  I fix my TV. Self-taught.  Very easy to learn most of these skills which is why people without advanced qualifications go into them as jobs.

I am absolutely sure I could sew a mantilla.  It has to be child's play to hem a square piece of lace and sew it with a machine.  It is like sewing 101.

If you want the budget to go MUCH further and I assume that is the purpose here to give away as many, head coverings as possible, then making them yourself is by far the most cost-effective way.  And you can then teach other people to do it.
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#23
JayneK: I have actually done some sewing.  In my 7th grade home economics class, I sewed things more complicated than a mantilla.  More than that, I have seen my wife learn to sew more complicated things just be being adventurous and trying new things.

I have had the same experience with things like carpentry, plumbing, cooking, and so on.  If it's really complex, get a professional, but if it's simpler (can't be simpler than a mantilla), and you aren't rich, then it's often worth doing it yourself.

I also avoid doing certain things myself if it's a safety issue or I don't want to ruin something (e.g. I might not attempt electrical work because the cost of error is high).  But with cooking or sewing, what's the worst that is likely to happen?  You mess up a dish, or the first mantilla doesn't come out well.  Try again :-).
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#24
I am surprised people are suggesting that the OP learn to sew and make the mantillas herself. That is not practical at all unless she has plenty of time, but surely we want to get those women in mantillas ASAP. As a beginner, I wouldn't dare to work with lace unless it was ultra-cheap coarse stuff that I wouldn't want to wear to church anyway.

By the way, the kind of mantilla the OP wants is probably a doily, which is round, or a chapel veil, which is triangular. Nothing as simple as a square (which isn't that easy anyway; at least not for clumsy ol' me). My own chapel veil is actually slightly uneven, though it was made by an experienced mantilla maker.

Typical male contempt for feminine work.  Rolling eyes
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#25
I was never taught to sew but am determined to learn.  I have now made about 6 veils/headcoverings... scratch that... I have now ATTEMPTED to make about 6 veils/headcoverings.  Each one has turned out to be a disaster.  I'll keep trying as I find time but maybe some of us just don't have that particular gift.  ...  But I can frenchbraid hair like a pro or bake a mean pound cake!  Smile 
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#26
(08-20-2011, 02:33 AM)ggreg Wrote:
(08-19-2011, 02:54 PM)aDREfromMI Wrote: Oh dear. I'm afraid I wouldn't have a clue how to sew, much less where to buy the lace!

There is this tool called the Internet.  You can search for "lace suppliers" and "how to use a sewing machine"

If illiterate women in the third world can use a sewing machine how hard can it be?  It is just a square of cloth for goodness sake.  You cut it with a razor blade and a wooden stencil and hem the sides.  That's about it I would guess.

Show a little backbone.  If you sew them yourself your budget will go 5-10 times as far.  More women get their heads covered which is your objective is it not.

Go for it, buddy. Make my day. Sew one and post it on the internet. Big shot.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#27
What's this?!?!?! Sounds of crickets and katydids..... Maybe he's off starting up his website.

ggregheadcoverings.com  LOL

eh, eh, eh
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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#28
Holy moley, just buy a headscarf.  Mrs DS uses a flowered scarf she got in Afghanistan for like three cents.
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#29
(08-22-2011, 08:45 PM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: Holy moley, just buy a headscarf.  Mrs DS uses a flowered scarf she got in Afghanistan for like three cents.

Headscarf… 3¢

Trip to Afghanistan and back… $3,000

;D



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#30
(08-22-2011, 09:14 PM)Revixit Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 08:45 PM)DesperatelySeeking Wrote: Holy moley, just buy a headscarf.  Mrs DS uses a flowered scarf she got in Afghanistan for like three cents.

Headscarf… 3¢

Trip to Afghanistan and back… $3,000

;D

Courtesy of Uncle Sam...gratis.  And a boatload of tax free combat pay to boot.
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