Poll: Which ancient Liturgy do you prefer
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Ancient Liturgy Preference (only respond if you have attended both)
#11
Call me an occidentalist, but I find I prefer the Latin rite. It seems more quiet and meditative, a silent and humble consent to the mysteries of God. It has less spectacle and movement. Still I find beauty in the east as well.
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#12
Love them both.
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#13
(08-20-2011, 09:58 AM)Revixit Wrote: What language is used in the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom?

I have been to Greek Orthodox and Russian Orthodox churches but it was many, many years ago,

The Greeks in the diaspora use Greek. Other Orthodox (and the ECC) use the vernacular. Nothing V II about it either. It's always been the tradition. I used to attend an Antiochian Orthodox Church which had a mixed congregation of Arabs, Greeks and 'Americans'. The Liturgy was mostly in English but with some of the Litanies sung in Arabic or Greek.
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#14
Doubtless the TLM.. I don't know what I'd do without the "Suscipe, sancte Pater," Offerimus tibi, Domine," and "Sucsipe, sancta Trinitas." The offertory as a whole is one of the most beautiful and theologically rich parts of the Mass, and there simply is no offertory in the Eastern liturgy.

Another thing that I prefer about the TLM is that holy Communion is distributed to the faithful under single species and is distributed kneeling.

I also dislike that the Eastern rites usually use the vernacular rather than Greek, original language of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom as well as that of St. Basil.

Also, it appears that in the Byzantine liturgy the priest places Christ's Body in his palm before consuming the Host, and he does not thereafter purify his palms. as can be seen at 0:42 of this video.



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#15
(08-20-2011, 04:03 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: I also dislike that the Eastern rites usually use the vernacular rather than Greek, original language of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom as well as that of St. Basil.

When I attend the Divine Liturgy, I'm generally glad if it isn't in Greek, simply because I don't know a lot of Greek. But having said that, one thing I really like about the use of Greek is that there is only one possible creedal text in that language.
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#16
I attended the DL in Ukraine (Kiev).

It was nice, but I think the TLM is superior. 

I do like the Eastern vestments, though.

And the Ukrainian women...  I like them more.  ;)
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#17
(08-20-2011, 04:03 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: I also dislike that the Eastern rites usually use the vernacular rather than Greek, original language of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom as well as that of St. Basil.

Said without a whiff of irony considering that the original language of the liturgy in Rome was Greek which was eventually changed to the Latin vernacular.  ???
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#18
(08-20-2011, 11:15 PM)Silouan Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 04:03 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: I also dislike that the Eastern rites usually use the vernacular rather than Greek, original language of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom as well as that of St. Basil.

Said without a whiff of irony considering that the original language of the liturgy in Rome was Greek which was eventually changed to the Latin vernacular.  ???

The distinct prayers of the Roman Mass, such as the collects, the offertory prayers, and the Canon, were composed after the liturgical language had already been changed to Latin. The original language for these prayers is Latin, not Greek.
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#19
(08-20-2011, 11:15 PM)Silouan Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 04:03 PM)Resurrexi Wrote: I also dislike that the Eastern rites usually use the vernacular rather than Greek, original language of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom as well as that of St. Basil.

Said without a whiff of irony considering that the original language of the liturgy in Rome was Greek which was eventually changed to the Latin vernacular.  ???
By the time St John Chrysostom died in the fifth century, Latin had already become the liturgical language of Rome.  Doubtless Greek was used very early on but had been replaced by Latin long before any standardization of the Roman Liturgy (eg by St Gregory in the 6th century).  The nearly universal use of Latin  in ancient Western liturgies (Roman, Gallican, Ambrosian, Celtic) is good evidence in my mind not only of an early adoption of Latin as a sacral language but also that the use of Latin acted as a symbol of the continuity of the Liturgical patrimony.
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#20
(08-21-2011, 01:30 AM)Landelinus Wrote:
(08-20-2011, 11:15 PM)Silouan Wrote: Said without a whiff of irony considering that the original language of the liturgy in Rome was Greek which was eventually changed to the Latin vernacular.  ???
By the time St John Chrysostom died in the fifth century, Latin had already become the liturgical language of Rome.  Doubtless Greek was used very early on but had been replaced by Latin long before any standardization of the Roman Liturgy (eg by St Gregory in the 6th century).  The nearly universal use of Latin  in ancient Western liturgies (Roman, Gallican, Ambrosian, Celtic) is good evidence in my mind not only of an early adoption of Latin as a sacral language but also that the use of Latin acted as a symbol of the continuity of the Liturgical patrimony.

You both make some good points.
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