Saint John of Avila to be Declared a Doctor of the Church
#31
(08-22-2011, 01:03 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Every Catholic worth his salt knows that these female doctors are just a modernist invention to appease feminism and liberalism.

It's not even worth discussing. It's just plain pathetic! "Look! The Church has women doctors too! Please, come next Sunday!"

This.

It makes no sense to me that Therese of Lisieux can be in the same category as Ambrose, Augustine, Basil, Bernard, Chrysostom, Jerome, Robert, Thomas, etc.

They are in completely different categories of saints. The title of Virgin suffices and rewards them enough in my opinion. We don't need to make them out to be what they weren't, and they certainly weren't teachers of theology in any way like the Fathers were.
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#32
(08-22-2011, 01:15 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:03 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Every Catholic worth his salt knows that these female doctors are just a modernist invention to appease feminism and liberalism.

It's not even worth discussing. It's just plain pathetic! "Look! The Church has women doctors too! Please, come next Sunday!"

This.

It makes no sense to me that Therese of Lisieux can be in the same category as Ambrose, Augustine, Basil, Bernard, Chrysostom, Jerome, Robert, Thomas, etc.

They are in completely different categories of saints. The title of Virgin suffices and rewards them enough in my opinion. We don't need to make them out to be what they weren't, and they certainly weren't teachers of theology in any way like the Fathers were.

Oh, but they were women and we love women too!

Please, accept us!
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#33
(08-22-2011, 12:43 AM)Gerard Wrote:
(08-21-2011, 11:19 PM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: [Image: SaintTeresaAvila.jpg]

LOL You lose.

Oh, by the way, have you guys ever actually read her works. ... Nothing to learn from her.  Rolling eyes

What does having anything to learn from her have to do with calling her "doctor"? 

And who said anything about nothing to learn from her?  You think because someone has something valuable, they are entitled to be used to hijack language and gender roles?    You are making the women-priest argument. 

But the pope hasn't consecrated a woman as a priest. He has declared three women as Doctors of the Church.  You learn from a teacher/doctor.

Doctor
Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English docto ( u ) r  (< Anglo-French ) < Latin,  equivalent to doc ( ēre ) to teach + -tor -tor

Saint Teresa of Avila taught. The church has especially commended her "teaching" to the faithful.  Saint Therese of Lisieux taught the "Little Way."  The "Little Way" has been specially commended to the faithful, thus the Doctor title.

Who's hijacking language?  There were women "masters" in medieval guilds.  Did that hijack gender roles?  By the way, who's "gender roles" did Saint Catherine of Siena, Saint Teresa of Avila, and Saint Therese of Lisieux threaten?  They didn't exactly butt heads with their authentic femininity or reject the standard expectations of their society.  Dare I suggest that you're offended by the idea that the Church does not teach that women's "general role" is always barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen.  It's like you're conservative for the sake of being conservative.

Woman Doctor of the Church = Woman Priest... no jump there.  Rolling eyes

Oh, and these women did not teach from the pulpit, so no St. Paul smack down for these three.
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#34
(08-22-2011, 01:19 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: Who's hijacking language?  There were women "masters" in medieval guilds.  Did that hijack gender roles?  By the way, who's "gender roles" did Saint Catherine of Siena, Saint Teresa of Avila, and Saint Therese of Lisieux threaten?  They didn't exactly butt heads with their authentic femininity or reject the standard expectations of their society.  Dare I suggest that you're offended by the idea that the Church does not teach that women's "general role" is always barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen.  It's like you're conservative for the sake of being conservative.

There you go, your true colours have been shown.

You might think you're being "manly" and "righteous" but you're just being pathetic: a true enabler of evil of the worst kind. I can smell the likes of you at distance.
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#35
(08-22-2011, 01:19 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: Oh, by the way, have you guys ever actually read her works. ... Nothing to learn from her.  Rolling eyes

I have so much I could learn from every single saint the church has ever canonized.  Are they all doctors?
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#36
(08-22-2011, 01:18 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:15 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:03 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: Every Catholic worth his salt knows that these female doctors are just a modernist invention to appease feminism and liberalism.

It's not even worth discussing. It's just plain pathetic! "Look! The Church has women doctors too! Please, come next Sunday!"

This.

It makes no sense to me that Therese of Lisieux can be in the same category as Ambrose, Augustine, Basil, Bernard, Chrysostom, Jerome, Robert, Thomas, etc.

They are in completely different categories of saints. The title of Virgin suffices and rewards them enough in my opinion. We don't need to make them out to be what they weren't, and they certainly weren't teachers of theology in any way like the Fathers were.

Oh, but they were women and we love women too!

Please, accept us!

What of Saint Therese of Lisieux is not of the same category as the above other than not being a bishop?  The Church does teach that one does not need to be bishop to be a great saint or to have a great impact on the world.  The Doctor pertains to the teaching, not the office that they held.  These three women did give the Church priceless teaching that no man in church history was better able to present.  That is just the truth.  Sorry.  Saint Teresa of Avila wrote more thoroughly and more eloquently on prayer than any other male or female saint.  Therefore Doctor of Prayer.  Not my opinion -- the Church's.  If the Church wanted to appease feminists she sure is doing an awful job of it.  What world have you been living in?
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#37
Saint Therese lissuex is not a teacher or a doctor or w.e. being women aside. She cant' even be compared to the other Doctors. She did not teach in anyway that resembles the way they did.
She lived a holy life she lived the little way, if you wanna go around swapping words and say she "taught" the little way w.e it still doesnt compare with the mass theological works these Doctors of the church did.

Saint Anthony The Great "taught" the monastic way  but i wouldnt consider him a doctor of the church.
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#38
(08-22-2011, 01:35 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: These three women did give the Church priceless teaching that no man in church history was better able to present. 
Are you serious?

Quote:That is just the truth.  Sorry.  Saint Teresa of Avila wrote more thoroughly and more eloquently on prayer than any other male or female saint.  Therefore Doctor of Prayer.  Not my opinion -- the Church's.  If the Church wanted to appease feminists she sure is doing an awful job of it.  What world have you been living in?
I think you need to read some more of the Church Fathers my friend.
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#39
(08-22-2011, 01:35 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: What of Saint Therese of Lisieux is not of the same category as the above other than not being a bishop?  The Church does teach that one does not need to be bishop to be a great saint or to have a great impact on the world.  The Doctor pertains to the teaching, not the office that they held.  These three women did give the Church priceless teaching that no man in church history was better able to present.  That is just the truth.  Sorry.  Saint Teresa of Avila wrote more thoroughly and more eloquently on prayer than any other male or female saint.  Therefore Doctor of Prayer.  Not my opinion -- the Church's.  If the Church wanted to appease feminists she sure is doing an awful job of it.  What world have you been living in?

What an emotional rant! St. Teresa of Avila (16th century) "wrote more thoroughly and more eloquently on prayer than any other male or female saint" and yet we had to wait until Paul " I want to destroy the Church" VI came along to realise it!

When, pray tell, were these female saints ever declared "doctors" if not in the post-conciliar milieu, infested with modernism, liberalism and feminism? Wake up and smell the coffee.

I live in the real world, I've taken the red pill a long time ago.
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#40
(08-22-2011, 01:43 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:35 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: What of Saint Therese of Lisieux is not of the same category as the above other than not being a bishop?  The Church does teach that one does not need to be bishop to be a great saint or to have a great impact on the world.  The Doctor pertains to the teaching, not the office that they held.  These three women did give the Church priceless teaching that no man in church history was better able to present.  That is just the truth.  Sorry.  Saint Teresa of Avila wrote more thoroughly and more eloquently on prayer than any other male or female saint.  Therefore Doctor of Prayer.  Not my opinion -- the Church's.  If the Church wanted to appease feminists she sure is doing an awful job of it.  What world have you been living in?

What an emotional rant! St. Teresa of Avila (16th century) "wrote more thoroughly and more eloquently on prayer than any other male or female saint" and yet we had to wait until Paul " I want to destroy the Church" VI came along to realise it!

St. Isadore of Seville, who died in 560, wasn't made a doctor of the Church until more than a millennium later, in 1722. It sometimes does take quite a long time for worthy saints to be made doctors of the Church.
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