Saint John of Avila to be Declared a Doctor of the Church
#51
Good Night. Smile
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#52
(08-22-2011, 01:58 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:54 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:53 AM)Gorgondie Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:49 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote:   Saint Therese of Lisieux is not as great a theologian as Saint Augustine  Smile, but she is a greater saint and she did very likely have a greater understanding of holiness and sanctity
um... whaaa? so you deem Therese to have a greater understanding of holiness then Augustine becuase you say so... ya okay w.e guy

You're now qualified to determine that St. Therese had a greater understanding of holiness than did St. Augustine.

How laughable.

Your opinion, not the Church's.  By the way, Saint Monica likely has a higher place in heaven than her son.

your opinion not the Churchs
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#53
(08-22-2011, 01:58 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:54 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:53 AM)Gorgondie Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:49 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote:   Saint Therese of Lisieux is not as great a theologian as Saint Augustine  Smile, but she is a greater saint and she did very likely have a greater understanding of holiness and sanctity
um... whaaa? so you deem Therese to have a greater understanding of holiness then Augustine becuase you say so... ya okay w.e guy

You're now qualified to determine that St. Therese had a greater understanding of holiness than did St. Augustine.

How laughable.

Your opinion, not the Church's.  By the way, Saint Monica likely has a higher place in heaven than her son.

o and btw he wasn't giving an opinion, he made a remark  stating you have no authority on whether St Therese was holier then Augustine
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#54
(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:46 AM)Resurrexi Wrote: St. Isadore of Seville, who died in 560, wasn't made a doctor of the Church until more than a millennium later, in 1722. It sometimes does take quite a long time for worthy saints to be made doctors of the Church.

What exactly did Therese of Lisieux do that is worthy of he being called a Doctor of the Church?

She helped countless souls grow closer to God through her Story of a Soul, along with pioneering devotion to Christ as an infant.
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#55
(08-22-2011, 01:58 AM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: Your opinion, not the Church's.  By the way, Saint Monica likely has a higher place in heaven than her son.

Are you St. Peter at the gates now?

You seem to know a lot about exactly how saintly each saint was.
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#56
(08-22-2011, 02:05 AM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:46 AM)Resurrexi Wrote: St. Isadore of Seville, who died in 560, wasn't made a doctor of the Church until more than a millennium later, in 1722. It sometimes does take quite a long time for worthy saints to be made doctors of the Church.

What exactly did Therese of Lisieux do that is worthy of he being called a Doctor of the Church?

She helped countless souls grow closer to God through her Story of a Soul, along with pioneering devotion to Christ as an infant.

Yes, but we have established in this thread that she was tainted with modernism. 
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#57
(08-22-2011, 02:05 AM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:46 AM)Resurrexi Wrote: St. Isadore of Seville, who died in 560, wasn't made a doctor of the Church until more than a millennium later, in 1722. It sometimes does take quite a long time for worthy saints to be made doctors of the Church.

What exactly did Therese of Lisieux do that is worthy of he being called a Doctor of the Church?

She helped countless souls grow closer to God through her Story of a Soul, along with pioneering devotion to Christ as an infant.

Im sure Saint Dominic brought countless souls closer to God to. and he pioneered devotion to the Rosary. doesnt make him a Doctor of the Church
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#58
(08-22-2011, 02:07 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 02:05 AM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)K3vinhood Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:46 AM)Resurrexi Wrote: St. Isadore of Seville, who died in 560, wasn't made a doctor of the Church until more than a millennium later, in 1722. It sometimes does take quite a long time for worthy saints to be made doctors of the Church.

What exactly did Therese of Lisieux do that is worthy of he being called a Doctor of the Church?

She helped countless souls grow closer to God through her Story of a Soul, along with pioneering devotion to Christ as an infant.

Yes, but we have established in this thread that she was tainted with modernism. 

She wasn't tainted with modernism, no one said that.

The idea that she is in the same category as the great Doctors of the Church in terms of writing theological works which the Church uses for doctrines and such is ridiculous.
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#59
(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:46 AM)Resurrexi Wrote: St. Isadore of Seville, who died in 560, wasn't made a doctor of the Church until more than a millennium later, in 1722. It sometimes does take quite a long time for worthy saints to be made doctors of the Church.

1) St. Isidore was male;

The traditional collect for St. Teresa of Avila's asks, ""caelestis eius doctrinae pabulo nutriamur"--"may we be nourished by the food of her heavenly doctrine."

That's not terribly different from stating that she's a doctor of the Church.

(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: 2) In 1722 the Church wasn't infected with modernism and liberalism up to the top.

That there were lots of problems in the 1970s does not mean that everything done during that decade was wrong.
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#60
(08-22-2011, 01:46 AM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 01:46 AM)Resurrexi Wrote: St. Isadore of Seville, who died in 560, wasn't made a doctor of the Church until more than a millennium later, in 1722. It sometimes does take quite a long time for worthy saints to be made doctors of the Church.

1) St. Isidore was male;

The traditional collect for St. Teresa of Avila's asks, ""caelestis eius doctrinae pabulo nutriamur"--"may we be nourished by the food of her heavenly doctrine."

That's not terribly different from stating that she's a doctor of the Church.

That still doesnt make her male.(which was the point Vetus is arguing here)


(08-22-2011, 01:47 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: 2) In 1722 the Church wasn't infected with modernism and liberalism up to the top.
Quote:That there were lots of problems in the 1970s does not mean that everything done during that decade was wrong.

Still doesnt mean making her a  Doctor of the Church was right.
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