Saint John of Avila to be Declared a Doctor of the Church
#81
So the gap widens. While this is all interesting. It would be nice if they put the whole promotion machine on hold and cleaned up the mess in the Church.
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#82
SSPX Wrote:We could legitimately ask the question why clergymen would feel the need to expand the notion of a Doctor to include women, and whether there is in this desire a deep-seated influence from the feminist egalitarianism that is one aspect of the post-Conciliar revolution in the Church. It certainly seems that this is the real motivation. However, the right of the Church to extend the concept of "Doctor" in an analogical sense, to those who share the necessary qualities, but who are not actually Confessors, that is public teachers, but Virgins, cannot be denied. The term "Doctor" still retains a very real meaning, even if the differences, as in every analogy, are greater than the similarity.

They seem to be very careful with the language here. But clearly say there are differences between confessors and virgins to which may be greater than the similarities. Yes they drew the conclusion that the term "Doctor" can be applied to these saints, but I disagree.

Williamson has it right. Like usual.
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#83
(08-22-2011, 01:23 PM)K3vinhood Wrote:
SSPX Wrote:We could legitimately ask the question why clergymen would feel the need to expand the notion of a Doctor to include women, and whether there is in this desire a deep-seated influence from the feminist egalitarianism that is one aspect of the post-Conciliar revolution in the Church. It certainly seems that this is the real motivation. However, the right of the Church to extend the concept of "Doctor" in an analogical sense, to those who share the necessary qualities, but who are not actually Confessors, that is public teachers, but Virgins, cannot be denied. The term "Doctor" still retains a very real meaning, even if the differences, as in every analogy, are greater than the similarity.

They seem to be very careful with the language here. But clearly say there are differences between confessors and virgins to which may be greater than the similarities. Yes they drew the conclusion that the term "Doctor" can be applied to these saints, but I disagree.

Williamson has it right. Like usual.

The SSPX disagrees, the Pope disagrees, the Church disagrees.  You're entitled to an opinion... you're just wrong.

Oh, and by the way, the TLM may be fully restored, the pope might personally apologize for the wrongs done to the traditionalists, we may be entirely and officially vindicated, a thousand years of peace may reign on this earth, justice and mercy kiss, the lion might lay down with the lamb... and still Sts. Teresa of Jesus, Cathrine of Siena, and Therese of the Child Jesus will be Doctors of the Church.  Sorry.  Have fun spinning out in the wilderness.

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#84
(08-22-2011, 02:18 PM)Roger the Shrubber Wrote: The SSPX disagrees, the Pope disagrees, the Church disagrees.  You're entitled to an opinion... you're just wrong.

Oh, and by the way, the TLM may be fully restored, the pope might personally apologize for the wrongs done to the traditionalists, we may be entirely and officially vindicated, a thousand years of peace may rein on this earth, justice and mercy kiss, the lion might lay down with the lamb... and still Sts. Teresa of Jesus, Cathrine of Siena, and Therese of the Child Jesus will be Doctors of the Church.  Sorry.  Have fun spinning out in the wilderness.

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The SSPX say's feminism was a major factor in these saints receiving the title of Doctor.

If I agreed with everything Pope Paul VI and John Paul II did, I wouldn't be a trad. Guess who the only 2 popes who have declared females as Doctors of the Church are...

I'm not the only one who see's the problem and stupidity of this. Playing around with the titles of saints to appease feminists, is sickeningly disgusting.

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#85
I would have to research what a doctor of the Church is and what the Church says about it. It may well be that they have a rightful place there. I do know, however, that my priest specifically said he had no idea why St Therese was a Doctor of the Church. I think the Little Way is enough, in my opinion. He also has said that Paul VI and JPII are in competition as being the worst Popes ever. Certainly it was motivated by feminism. We had to make up for our sexist ways.
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#86
(08-22-2011, 10:17 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 09:56 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: We're just one step away from becoming like CAF.

Because people here agree with the SSPX that women doctors are fine?

Really?

So either you agree with Bishop Williamson or you're a modernist? 

What would you know?

Was that a serious question or yet another pun?
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#87
(08-22-2011, 04:14 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 10:17 AM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 09:56 AM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: We're just one step away from becoming like CAF.

Because people here agree with the SSPX that women doctors are fine?

Really?

So either you agree with Bishop Williamson or you're a modernist? 

What would you know?

Was that a serious question or yet another pun?

Where's the pun?  ???
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#88
Catholic Encyclopedia:

The requisite conditions are enumerated as three: eminens doctrina, insignis vitae sanctitas, Ecclesiae declaratio (i.e. eminent learning, a high degree of sanctity, and proclamation by the Church).

Interesting that male is not one of the requirements here. Perhaps it was taken for granted. As for St. Therese, she certainly wasn't eminent learned, as she herself admitted. Hmmm ... maybe they're changing the rules.
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#89
(08-22-2011, 04:17 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: Catholic Encyclopedia:

The requisite conditions are enumerated as three: eminens doctrina, insignis vitae sanctitas, Ecclesiae declaratio (i.e. eminent learning, a high degree of sanctity, and proclamation by the Church).

Interesting that male is not one of the requirements here. Perhaps it was taken for granted. As for St. Therese, she certainly wasn't eminent learned, as she herself admitted. Hmmm ... maybe they're changing the rules.

But what is eminent learning?  You could make a good argument (IMHO) that St. Therese was eminently learned, even if not in the way the world thinks of it (no degrees).  It's not just her sancitity and example that make her a doctor, but her actual teaching, which she learned directly from Our Lord in her prayer and closeness to Him.
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#90
(08-22-2011, 04:22 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote:
(08-22-2011, 04:17 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: Catholic Encyclopedia:

The requisite conditions are enumerated as three: eminens doctrina, insignis vitae sanctitas, Ecclesiae declaratio (i.e. eminent learning, a high degree of sanctity, and proclamation by the Church).

Interesting that male is not one of the requirements here. Perhaps it was taken for granted. As for St. Therese, she certainly wasn't eminent learned, as she herself admitted. Hmmm ... maybe they're changing the rules.

But what is eminent learning?  You could make a good argument (IMHO) that St. Therese was eminently learned, even if not in the way the world thinks of it (no degrees).  It's not just her sancitity and example that make her a doctor, but her actual teaching, which she learned directly from Our Lord in her prayer and closeness to Him.

And yet the Traditional Church never bothered with declaring her a "Doctor."

I wonder if it was because of misogyny.
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