The Confederacy was a Jewish Conspiracy
#1
Wikipedia Wrote:The flag that Miles had favored when he was chair of the Committee on the Flag and Seal eventually became the battle flag and, ultimately, the most popular flag of the Confederacy. According to historian John Coski, Miles' design was inspired by one of the many "secessionist flags" flown at the South Carolina secession convention of December, 1860. That flag was a blue St George's Cross (an upright or Latin cross) on a red field, with 15 white stars on the cross, representing the Confederate States (assumed to be the 15 slave states), and, on the red field, palmetto and crescent symbols. Miles received a variety of feedback on this design, including a critique from Charles Moise, a self-described "Southerner of Jewish persuasion". Moise liked the design, but asked that "the symbol of a particular religion not be made the symbol of the nation." Taking this into account, Miles changed his flag, removing the palmetto and crescent, and substituting a heraldic saltire ("X") for the upright one. The number of stars was changed several times as well. He described these changes and his reasons for making them in early 1861. The diagonal cross was preferable, he wrote, because "it avoided the religious objection about the cross (from the Jews and many Protestant sects), because it did not stand out so conspicuously as if the cross had been placed upright thus." He also argued that the diagonal cross was "more Heraldric [sic] than Ecclesiastical, it being the 'saltire' of Heraldry, and significant of strength and progress."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederate...ite_ref-13

The Confederate flag had a Cross until the JEWS!!!!!111oneeleven infiltrated the CSA and replaced the Cross with an X!!!!!!1111

Before:
[Image: SC-SovFlag.svg]

After:
[Image: Confederate_Rebel_Flag.svg]
Reply
#2
Scottish Jews, methinks.
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
Reply
#3
Yeah, except a saltire is also known as St. Andrew's Cross.
Reply
#4
(08-30-2011, 07:50 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Yeah, except a saltire is also known as St. Andrew's Cross.

You're saint Andrew is in on it too?

I knew it.
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
Reply
#5
Both are beautiful representations of liberty, self-determination, fortitude, and virtue.

God Bless the South! And we beseech, Almighty Lord, to make Colorado part of it.  ;D
Reply
#6
I don't really see anything wrong with the Confederacy, personally.
Reply
#7
(08-31-2011, 06:03 PM)Norbert Wrote: I don't really see anything wrong with the Confederacy, personally.

Based on previous Civil War discussions, the vast majority of this forum is pro-CSA so your opinion is actually mainstream here.

I'm personally neutral. The whole war was stupid on both sides.
Reply
#8
There is nothing wrong with the Confederacy both in historical and contemporary perspective.
Reply
#9
It's been said before, 'Keep your Confederate money, boys! The South will rise again!'

Deo vindice!

A poem about the Flag, by the Priest-Poet of the Confederacy, Fr Abram Joseph Ryan, who ddespaired of the South's rising again.

Father Ryan Wrote:THE CONQUERED BANNER.


                        FURL that Banner, for 'tis weary;
                        Round its staff 'tis drooping dreary;
                        Furl it, fold it, it is best:
                        For there's not a man to wave it,
                        And there' not a sword to save it,
                        And there's not one left to lave it
                        In the blood which heroes gave it;
                        And its foes now scorn and brave it;
                        Furl it, hide it--let it rest.


                        Take that Banner down, 'tis tattered;
                        Broken is its staff and shattered;
                        And the valiant hosts are scattered,
                        Over whom it floated high.
                        Oh! 'tis hard for us to fold it;
                        Hard to think there's none to hold it;
                        Hard that those, who once unrolled it,
                        Now must furl it with a sigh.


                        Furl that Banner--furl it sadly;
                        Once ten thousands hailed it gladly,
                        And ten thousands wildly, madly,
                        Swore it should forever wave;
                        Swore that foeman's sword should never
                        Hearts like theirs entwined dissever,
                        Till that flag should float forever
                        O'er their freedom, or their grave!

                        Furl it! for the hands that grasped it,
                        And the hearts that fondly clasped it,
                        Cold and dead are lying low;
                        And that Banner--it is trailing!
                        While around it sounds the wailing
                        Of its people in their woe.


                        For, though conquered, they adore it!
                        Love the cold, dead hands that bore it!
                        Weep for those who fell before it!
                        Pardon those who trailed and tore it!
                        But, oh! wildly they deplore it,
                        Now who furl and fold it so.


                        Furl that Banner! True, 'tis gory,
                        Yet 'tis wreathed around with glory,
                        And 'twill live in song and story,
                        Though its folds are in the dust:
                        For its fame on brightest pages,
                        Penned by poets and by sages,
                        Shall go sounding down the ages--
                        Furl its folds though now we must.


                        Furl that Banner, softly, slowly,
                        Treat it gently--it is holy--
                        For it droops above the dead.
                        Touch it not--unfold it never,
                        Let it droop there, furled forever,
                        For its people's hopes are dead!
Reply
#10
(08-31-2011, 06:23 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: It's been said before, 'Keep your Confederate money, boys! The South will rise again!'

Deo vindice!

This.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)