Social upheaval before V2
#21
I'm not teaching. I'm telling cars where to park. :/
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#22
(09-07-2011, 10:22 PM)knittycat Wrote: I'm not teaching. I'm telling cars where to park. :/

Lol. I think you should be fine.

I do agree with HK that there is a problem that men have disappeared from the leadership of churches. But, he goes a little overboard.
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#23
(09-07-2011, 10:15 PM)knittycat Wrote: So, that begs the question. Where are they? The priest was BEGGING people to volunteer for CCD this year. There are three years with no teacher. And there are very few people helping out with traffic control. Does that mean I shouldn't volunteer cuz I'm not a man?

Emasculated or too busy watching sports, I guess.

To be honest, I have the same problem when we beg other men to join our Gregorian schola, few ever show up to weekly practices, and we get enthusiastic about newcomers who have no musical experience whatsoever. (Meanwhile, in at least one local Episcopal church, they care so much about the quality of music that they pay their musicians! Such an idea would be outrageous within Catholic-dom.) And to be fair, I was never a singer before I started with chant, either. Nevertheless, a schola made up of all men and boys with little professional experience is better than your typical choir of old ladies. Why? Besides the aesthetic quality, the fact that choir service, like altar service, is clerical in nature, and the participants act as Christ, even if in a lesser degree than the celebrant of Mass.

Here's our schola, all of whom are non-musicians:




As for CCD, in my opinion those should be taught by deacons. But failing that, a lay man is a better representative of the masculinity of Christ than a woman. Look at how, in the early 20th century, the everyday face of Catholicism for millions of schoolchildren was that of a nun, not a priest, deacon or brother. The Church was an effeminate entity that crumbled quickly after the Council.
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#24
Dung beetles do not magically emerge from feces like the Eyptians believed.  The eggs are there, they just aren't detectable to the naked eye.

Modernist heresy existed in the Church prior to the Council.  It had to have, or it wouldn't have been there to reveal itself.  Like the dung beetle eggs, these beliefs and practices lay under the surface, not noticed by the average Joe Sixpack in the pew.  St. Pius X was on to them, of course, like a scientist with a microscope finds the eggs.  To most people, though, it appears as though these practices began with the Council.

This doesn't make the Council great, good, or even redeemable.  It is the point when the infestation became visible, after all.
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#25
LittleFlower, that is a FABULOUS analogy!
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#26
Ok, HK, I agree the deaconate should be teaching CCD, But we only have two deacons. One of which has a wacky work schedule and can't teach. There is obviously a lack of men volunteering (and women for that matter), so who is left to fill the role? Yes men should teach, but where there are none, women just fill the void. It's not perfect, but it's all we've got.
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#27
(09-07-2011, 08:53 PM)Scipio_a Wrote: read ABLs books...this has been in the works since at least the French revolution.   the roots go farther back than that... St. Pius X wrote of it and worried about it...and attempted to halt or slow it....guess he slowed it.

I'm not sure what the ABLs books are but I agree with Scipio here.  Writings by Adam Weishaupt were intercepted in 1784 that showed long term plans to infiltrate the Catholic Church for the purpose of subverting and slandering the Church.  A friend gave me a book a few years ago that was written in the 1930s by a bishop from Pennsylvania or Baltimore or some where like that.  In the book the bishop wrote that he was thankful for all the new converts in the US, England and Scotland to the Church.  In 1952 during the era of McCarthyism Bella Dodd, a former member of the Communist Party of America testified before the US Senate about widespread Party infiltration of the government, labor unions, the Catholic Church and other institutions.  No doubt that some of these new converts that the good bishop wrote about in the 1930s were actually infiltrators that Bella Dodd talked about.  You know freemasonry is big in all three countries that the bishop wrote about, US, England and Scotland.  I don't believe all the Catholic bishops at the Second Vatican Council had nefarious ideas but no doubt some did.  
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#28
(09-07-2011, 10:28 PM)knittycat Wrote: LittleFlower, that is a FABULOUS analogy!

Thanks, KnittyCat.  :)
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#29
(09-07-2011, 10:31 PM)mikemac Wrote:
(09-07-2011, 08:53 PM)Scipio_a Wrote: read ABLs books...this has been in the works since at least the French revolution.   the roots go farther back than that... St. Pius X wrote of it and worried about it...and attempted to halt or slow it....guess he slowed it.

I'm not sure what the ABLs books are

ABL = Archbishop Lefebvre, founder of the SSPX.  I reccomend Letter to Confused Catholics as a good starting point for studying his beliefs.  :)
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#30
(09-07-2011, 10:31 PM)knittycat Wrote: Ok, HK, I agree the deaconate should be teaching CCD, But we only have two deacons. One of which has a wacky work schedule and can't teach. There is obviously a lack of men volunteering (and women for that matter), so who is left to fill the role? Yes men should teach, but where there are none, women just fill the void. It's not perfect, but it's all we've got.

Actually, two deacons is two more than what a lot of churches have right now.

I'm sick of seeing situations where only women are stepping up to serve the Church, so I'm absolutely browbeating men to get more involved. However, I think men would be more inclined to get involved if they knew they couldn't rely on women to step in.
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