NYC/JC area - Parish
#11
(09-11-2011, 08:48 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: I strongly advocate in favor of St. Anthony of Padua in West Orange.  At this community, the tradition only begins with the externals of the liturgy.  It is a true refuge that is exceedingly rare in our age.

(09-11-2011, 08:31 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 08:23 PM)Louis_Martin Wrote: Sermon is Latin. Homily is Greek. Both are Catholic.

In addition most traditional Catholics prefer the term sermon for whatever reason. 

I think this is similar to how we pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost whereas those who attend the New Rite instead pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  Neither is wrong, but the latter tends to be linked with a more progressive liturgical approach and less so with organic, historical spirituality (instead favoring a 'new, happy' spirituality.)

In common speak, 'sermon' seems to imply an instructive lesson whereas 'homily' seems to suggest an interpretive reflection. 

Hi King, I think you're mistaken. Only the English speakers pray Holy Ghost in the NO and this is about to change with the new missal, they'll pray Holy Spirit like everybody else in the world. Not sure, but isn't Holy Spirit the "right" latin translation?
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#12
(09-11-2011, 08:48 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: I strongly advocate in favor of St. Anthony of Padua in West Orange.  At this community, the tradition only begins with the externals of the liturgy.  It is a true refuge that is exceedingly rare in our age.

This is off-topic, but I'm trying to find a parish to settle down in, so to speak, and I'm wondering if they have a good homeschooling group there?  Not that I'd have to worry about that for a while.

It seems, much like the city itself, parishes in New York are full of professionals, but there's not much in terms of community as regards helping each other raise families.  NY is full of old people, whose kids have grown up, or young men who have no families.  I used to be at an ICKSP parish that had the most amazing community, including an excellent homeschool program, a growing schola, a Holy Name Society, general men's gatherings, an altar and rosary society, etc. but have since moved to the East Coast.
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#13
(09-11-2011, 08:48 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: I strongly advocate in favor of St. Anthony of Padua in West Orange.  At this community, the tradition only begins with the externals of the liturgy.  It is a true refuge that is exceedingly rare in our age.

(09-11-2011, 08:31 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 08:23 PM)Louis_Martin Wrote: Sermon is Latin. Homily is Greek. Both are Catholic.

In addition most traditional Catholics prefer the term sermon for whatever reason. 

I think this is similar to how we pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost whereas those who attend the New Rite instead pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  Neither is wrong, but the latter tends to be linked with a more progressive liturgical approach and less so with organic, historical spirituality (instead favoring a 'new, happy' spirituality.)

In common speak, 'sermon' seems to imply an instructive lesson whereas 'homily' seems to suggest an interpretive reflection. 

As per your suggestion of St Anthony, as soon as I get a car I promised I'll go there. Right now I can only go to churches relatively near my house, since I am relying on pub transportation - am in JC - meaning I go on foot to church. Or take the Path/Subway to NYC. But thanks for the strong support for St Anthony, I'll keep that in the back of my mind for sure. It won't take long (hopefully) for me to get a drivers license and a car.
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#14
(09-11-2011, 08:11 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 08:05 PM)patricia m. Wrote: Thanks a lot, I'll try Our Saviour Church then, next Sunday. Good to hear that the pastor is good, I like to hear a good well prepared homily every Sunday. This Sunday I've been to the TLM mass at the Holy Rosary Church in JC (ever been there?) and unfortunately we had no homily. I think this is kind of unforgivable.

The sermon is technically not part of the mass and it's fine not to have a sermon in the TLM (sermons are required on Sundays and days of Obligation in the NO unless there is a "serious reason.")

I do prefer masses with sermons, but it's good to be reminded from time to time that we don't attend church for the sermon.

Key difference between us and Protestants. 

I love low masses without the sermon.

It's so easy to concentrate.
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#15
(09-11-2011, 08:58 PM)patricia m. Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 08:48 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: I strongly advocate in favor of St. Anthony of Padua in West Orange.  At this community, the tradition only begins with the externals of the liturgy.  It is a true refuge that is exceedingly rare in our age.

(09-11-2011, 08:31 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 08:23 PM)Louis_Martin Wrote: Sermon is Latin. Homily is Greek. Both are Catholic.

In addition most traditional Catholics prefer the term sermon for whatever reason. 

I think this is similar to how we pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost whereas those who attend the New Rite instead pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  Neither is wrong, but the latter tends to be linked with a more progressive liturgical approach and less so with organic, historical spirituality (instead favoring a 'new, happy' spirituality.)

In common speak, 'sermon' seems to imply an instructive lesson whereas 'homily' seems to suggest an interpretive reflection. 

As per your suggestion of St Anthony, as soon as I get a car I promised I'll go there. Right now I can only go to churches relatively near my house, since I am relying on pub transportation - am in JC - meaning I go on foot to church. Or take the Path/Subway to NYC. But thanks for the strong support for St Anthony, I'll keep that in the back of my mind for sure. It won't take long (hopefully) for me to get a drivers license and a car.
I'm probably going to start going there, with my lack of success other places.  PM me, we could carpool.

I'm not a creepy dude or anything.  You can see me making a fool of myself in the karaoke thread.
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#16
(09-11-2011, 08:54 PM)patricia m. Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 08:48 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: I strongly advocate in favor of St. Anthony of Padua in West Orange.  At this community, the tradition only begins with the externals of the liturgy.  It is a true refuge that is exceedingly rare in our age.

(09-11-2011, 08:31 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 08:23 PM)Louis_Martin Wrote: Sermon is Latin. Homily is Greek. Both are Catholic.

In addition most traditional Catholics prefer the term sermon for whatever reason.  

I think this is similar to how we pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost whereas those who attend the New Rite instead pray in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  Neither is wrong, but the latter tends to be linked with a more progressive liturgical approach and less so with organic, historical spirituality (instead favoring a 'new, happy' spirituality.)

In common speak, 'sermon' seems to imply an instructive lesson whereas 'homily' seems to suggest an interpretive reflection.  

It's a bit convoluted

Hi King, I think you're mistaken. Only the English speakers pray Holy Ghost in the NO and this is about to change with the new missal, they'll pray Holy Spirit like everybody else in the world. Not sure, but isn't Holy Spirit the "right" latin translation?
I’m not sure what the new Novus Ordo translation is for the Trinity; truthfully it’s not on my radar screen.

‘Spirit’ vs. ‘Ghost’ is not exactly a debate I would wade into.  However, during the sermon at Old Rite communities, I have only heard ‘Ghost.’  The reason this has been the traditional translation in English has to do with English/German linguistics.  

I suppose you could say that during the 20th century progressives attempted to recreate (read simplify) language and so ‘Spirit’ in English is actually a novelty.

But definitely not something I would trip over!
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#17
(09-11-2011, 09:07 PM)Louis_Martin Wrote: I'm not a creepy dude or anything. 

The hallmark of a creeper. 
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#18
Some people make a big deal about Holy Ghost vs Holy Spirit, but most traditionalists don't care. This said most traditional Catholics, especially traditional priests, prefer to refer to the Holy Ghost.
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#19
(09-11-2011, 09:41 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: Some people make a big deal about Holy Ghost vs Holy Spirit, but most traditionalists don't care. This said most traditional Catholics, especially traditional priests, prefer to refer to the Holy Ghost.

Where do you get these generalizations about traditionalists from? You seem to do it often.

Just curious.
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#20
(09-11-2011, 09:43 PM)m.PR Wrote:
(09-11-2011, 09:41 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: Some people make a big deal about Holy Ghost vs Holy Spirit, but most traditionalists don't care. This said most traditional Catholics, especially traditional priests, prefer to refer to the Holy Ghost.

Where do you get these generalizations about traditionalists from? You seem to do it often.

Just curious.

Same place other people get generalizations. 
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