"Fr." Patrick J Conroy
#11
He may be derelict in his duty, but he was ordained.

Maybe you doubt the indelibility of the Holy Spirit's mark?
Reply
#12
(09-15-2011, 04:31 PM)GottmitunsAlex Wrote: So is Fr. Pfleger. (at least to your standards)

I don't like Fr Pfleger any more than you do, but yes, he is a 'Priest forever, after the Order of Melchizedek'.
Reply
#13
My 'standards" for the priesthood are not mine, they are the Holy Ghosts.
Reply
#14
I always preferred the older usage of addressing a secular priest as Sir/Don/Dom, anyway.
Reply
#15
quote author=The_Harlequin_King link=topic=3443813.msg33593843#msg33593843 date=1316121790]
I always preferred the older usage of addressing a secular priest as Sir/Don/Dom, anyway.
[/quote]I accidently called an SSPX priest "sir" once, and he did not appreciate it.
Reply
#16
(09-15-2011, 05:25 PM)dan hunter Wrote: quote author=The_Harlequin_King link=topic=3443813.msg33593843#msg33593843 date=1316121790]
I always preferred the older usage of addressing a secular priest as Sir/Don/Dom, anyway.
I accidently called an SSPX priest "sir" once, and he did not appreciate it.
[/quote]

I did that at in the sacristy by mistake and Father went all  :mad: on me
Reply
#17
I don't see what the fuss is. Secular priests in the U.S. were "mister's" in the U.S. until the mid-1800's, anyway, and I think they're still "don's" in Italy.

But I was referring to the pre-Reformation English practice of addressing a priest as Sir Firstname, like a knight.
Reply
#18
(09-15-2011, 05:31 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: I don't see what the fuss is. Secular priests in the U.S. were "mister's" in the U.S. until the mid-1800's, anyway, and I think they're still "don's" in Italy.

But I was referring to the pre-Reformation English practice of addressing a priest as Sir Firstname, like a knight.
ahhh if we only had a time machine
Reply
#19
(09-15-2011, 05:23 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: I always preferred the older usage of addressing a secular priest as Sir/Don/Dom, anyway.

The priest is referred to as "pater," though, in the "Confiteor" of the 1570 Missale Romanum, and the same was true of earlier missals going back at least to the fourteenth century.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04222a.htm
Reply
#20
(09-16-2011, 12:06 AM)Resurrexi Wrote:
(09-15-2011, 05:23 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: I always preferred the older usage of addressing a secular priest as Sir/Don/Dom, anyway.

The priest is referred to as "pater," though, in the "Confiteor" of the 1570 Missale Romanum, and the same was true of earlier missals going back at least to the fourteenth century.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04222a.htm

Actually as early as 1100 AD according to my research, but the average man in the street did not call a priest Father until much, much later. Sir John, Don Juan (or Giovanni), Dom Joao or Abbe Jean would have been much more common.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)