Jewish calendar question
#1
Today is the start of the New Year according to the Jewish calendar.

It is apparently the beginning of the year 5772.

Now, I don't wan't to turn this into another old-earth vs. new-earth debate, but I have a question.

If the biblical timeline's were to be taken literally, wouldn't the earth be somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 years old?

Why is the Jewish calendar only at 5,772 then?

I'm assuming of course that this is a measurement from Adam to now, but I may be wrong.
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#2
(09-29-2011, 01:54 AM)K3vinhood Wrote: Today is the start of the New Year according to the Jewish calendar.

It is apparently the beginning of the year 5772.

Now, I don't wan't to turn this into another old-earth vs. new-earth debates, but I have a question.

If the biblical timeline's were to be taken literally, wouldn't the earth be somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 years old?

Why is the Jewish calendar only at 5,772 then?

I'm assuming of course that this is a measurement from Adam to now, but I may be wrong.

It's theoretically from creation. Their figures are off. According to the Eastern Church we have just started AM 7520 and by the prot Ussher's calculations we're at about 6015. Ergo, you and the Church are correct!
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#3
(09-29-2011, 02:06 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: It's theoretically from creation. Their figures are off. According to the Eastern Church we have just started AM 7520 and by the prot Ussher's calculations we're at about 6015. Ergo, you and the Church are correct!

Thanks!

Is there a reason the Western Church doesn't count the years?

I know we don't have a specific calendar day which the liturgical year begins like the East (September 1, I believe) but did we abandon that tradition or did the West just never count the years?
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#4
Yeah Ussher said Adam and Eve were driven from Paradise on Monday 10 November 4004 BC.

John Lightfoot said man was created on October 23, 4004 B.C. at nine o'clock in the morning.

Ussher and Lightfoot were contemporaries.  How they come to the date and time is beyond me.  :)

3760 is the start of the Jewish year count.

Jovan do you have a link for the Eastern Church?

Wasn't there also an Irish Catholic bishop that figured it out?

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#5
(09-29-2011, 02:49 AM)mikemac Wrote: Jovan do you have a link for the Eastern Church?

Wasn't there also an Irish Catholic bishop that figured it out?

It's called the Byzantine Era and you can find it at most calendar sites or in the Old Farmers Almanac.

And I've not heard that. Ussher, of course, was a Church of Ireland (Anglican) 'Bishop'.
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#6
(09-29-2011, 02:15 AM)K3vinhood Wrote: I know we don't have a specific calendar day which the liturgical year begins like the East (September 1, I believe) but did we abandon that tradition or did the West just never count the years?

The liturgical year begins on the first Sunday of Advent. 

We count the years from the advent of Christ not the creation of the world. 
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#7
Wikipedia has a good article on it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_Calendar
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#8
The Chronicon of Eusebius (early 4th century) dated creation to 5228 BC while Jerome (c. 380, Constantinople) dated Creation to 5199 BC. Earlier editions of the Roman Martyrology for Christmas Day used this date, as did the Irish Annals of the Four Masters.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dating_Creation
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#9
(09-30-2011, 07:34 PM)mikemac Wrote: The Chronicon of Eusebius (early 4th century) dated creation to 5228 BC while Jerome (c. 380, Constantinople) dated Creation to 5199 BC. Earlier editions of the Roman Martyrology for Christmas Day used this date, as did the Irish Annals of the Four Masters.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dating_Creation

Yep. And you'll notice that all the Catholic sources make it between 7,000 and 8,000 years, whereas the prots and Jews have radically lower estimates? I have no idea why, I just find it interesting! :)
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#10
Yep
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