Jewish calendar question
#11
(09-30-2011, 07:37 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(09-30-2011, 07:34 PM)mikemac Wrote: The Chronicon of Eusebius (early 4th century) dated creation to 5228 BC while Jerome (c. 380, Constantinople) dated Creation to 5199 BC. Earlier editions of the Roman Martyrology for Christmas Day used this date, as did the Irish Annals of the Four Masters.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dating_Creation

Yep. And you'll notice that all the Catholic sources make it between 7,000 and 8,000 years, whereas the prots and Jews have radically lower estimates? I have no idea why, I just find it interesting! :)

It's based on how you count the generations in scripture.  There are a few gaps and a few spots where generations are repeated but given slightly differently.  Thus, some creativity has to be used to add up all the years. 
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#12
(09-30-2011, 07:41 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(09-30-2011, 07:37 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(09-30-2011, 07:34 PM)mikemac Wrote: The Chronicon of Eusebius (early 4th century) dated creation to 5228 BC while Jerome (c. 380, Constantinople) dated Creation to 5199 BC. Earlier editions of the Roman Martyrology for Christmas Day used this date, as did the Irish Annals of the Four Masters.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dating_Creation

Yep. And you'll notice that all the Catholic sources make it between 7,000 and 8,000 years, whereas the prots and Jews have radically lower estimates? I have no idea why, I just find it interesting! :)

It's based on how you count the generations in scripture.  There are a few gaps and a few spots where generations are repeated but given slightly differently.  Thus, some creativity has to be used to add up all the years. 

I know that, but what I'm wondering is why the non Catholics came up with such radically lower figures. We're not talking the minor variations the Catholics have, we're talking over a thousand years lower!
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#13
(09-30-2011, 07:44 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(09-30-2011, 07:41 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(09-30-2011, 07:37 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(09-30-2011, 07:34 PM)mikemac Wrote: The Chronicon of Eusebius (early 4th century) dated creation to 5228 BC while Jerome (c. 380, Constantinople) dated Creation to 5199 BC. Earlier editions of the Roman Martyrology for Christmas Day used this date, as did the Irish Annals of the Four Masters.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dating_Creation

Yep. And you'll notice that all the Catholic sources make it between 7,000 and 8,000 years, whereas the prots and Jews have radically lower estimates? I have no idea why, I just find it interesting! :)



It's based on how you count the generations in scripture.  There are a few gaps and a few spots where generations are repeated but given slightly differently.  Thus, some creativity has to be used to add up all the years. 

I know that, but what I'm wondering is why the non Catholics came up with such radically lower figures. We're not talking the minor variations the Catholics have, we're talking over a thousand years lower!

Just another attempt to try the portray the Catholic Church as the harbinger of lies?
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#14
Maybe it has to do with both the Prots and the Jews using the same Old Testament that's short 7 books and parts of Daniel and Esther.
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#15
(09-30-2011, 10:49 PM)mikemac Wrote: Maybe it has to do with both the Prots and the Jews using the same Old Testament that's short 7 books and parts of Daniel and Esther.

Actually, that had crossed my mind, but I don't think so. I can't recall any genealogies in any of the books they reject
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#16
I like how the "time" coincides wth the mitochondrial DNA of Eve being 7500 years ago. Amazing how that works out.

tim
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#17
(10-06-2011, 03:34 PM)Tim Wrote: I like how the "time" coincides wth the mitochondrial DNA of Eve being 7500 years ago. Amazing how that works out.

tim

But doesn't this same modern science claim that "mitochondrial Eve" lived thousands of years apart from "mitochondrial Adam"?

Also, this source, which is an oft-referenced source for this question, says that she lived ~200,000 years ago.

Where did you find the 7,500-year figure?
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#18
(09-29-2011, 01:54 AM)K3vinhood Wrote: Today is the start of the New Year according to the Jewish calendar.

It is apparently the beginning of the year 5772.

Now, I don't wan't to turn this into another old-earth vs. new-earth debate, but I have a question.

If the biblical timeline's were to be taken literally, wouldn't the earth be somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 years old?

Why is the Jewish calendar only at 5,772 then?

I'm assuming of course that this is a measurement from Adam to now, but I may be wrong.

They start counting from the Creation of Adam (Man). So, the point at which Man acquired a soul to set him apart from mere beasts.
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#19
(11-20-2011, 06:42 PM)coradcorloquitur Wrote:
(09-29-2011, 01:54 AM)K3vinhood Wrote: Today is the start of the New Year according to the Jewish calendar.

It is apparently the beginning of the year 5772.

Now, I don't wan't to turn this into another old-earth vs. new-earth debate, but I have a question.

If the biblical timeline's were to be taken literally, wouldn't the earth be somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 years old?

Why is the Jewish calendar only at 5,772 then?

I'm assuming of course that this is a measurement from Adam to now, but I may be wrong.

They start counting from the Creation of Adam (Man). So, the point at which Man acquired a soul to set him apart from mere beasts.

Yeah but I think what he is asking is why there is such a discrepancy between the Catholic time and the Jewish/Protestant time.  You know between 1,000 and 2,000 years difference.
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#20
(11-20-2011, 09:18 PM)mikemac Wrote:
(11-20-2011, 06:42 PM)coradcorloquitur Wrote:
(09-29-2011, 01:54 AM)K3vinhood Wrote: Today is the start of the New Year according to the Jewish calendar.

It is apparently the beginning of the year 5772.

Now, I don't wan't to turn this into another old-earth vs. new-earth debate, but I have a question.

If the biblical timeline's were to be taken literally, wouldn't the earth be somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 years old?

Why is the Jewish calendar only at 5,772 then?

I'm assuming of course that this is a measurement from Adam to now, but I may be wrong.

They start counting from the Creation of Adam (Man). So, the point at which Man acquired a soul to set him apart from mere beasts.

Yeah but I think what he is asking is why there is such a discrepancy between the Catholic time and the Jewish/Protestant time.  You know between 1,000 and 2,000 years difference.

I would venture to guess that is because they count time in a way the relates to themselves. Really, they are counting from what they deem to be the beginning of God's sovereignty in the world (the applicability of the Torah)... the giving of a Godly soul to Adam (which only refers to the Jews). The discrepancy is probably based on a different textual interpretation of what constitutes the beginning of Creation... or what the Creation even signifies.
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