Does the Pope possess Power to Depose Rulers and Absolve Subjects of Allegiance?
#1
According to the Dictatus Papae of Pope St. Gregory VII, yes he does. Fully and totally and unquestionably.

Where has this Pontifical Right gone nowadays? Anyone know?
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#2
(10-01-2011, 04:25 AM)Sabbathiel Wrote: According to the Dictatus Papae of Pope St. Gregory VII, yes he does. Fully and totally and unquestionably.

Where has this Pontifical Right gone nowadays? Anyone know?

The Pope has no secular power or authority.  If he ever believed he had such power, he was overstretching his authority, definitely.
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#3
(10-01-2011, 06:42 AM)Melkite Wrote: The Pope has no secular power or authority.  If he ever believed he had such power, he was overstretching his authority, definitely.

Indeed.
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#4
(10-01-2011, 06:42 AM)Melkite Wrote:
(10-01-2011, 04:25 AM)Sabbathiel Wrote: According to the Dictatus Papae of Pope St. Gregory VII, yes he does. Fully and totally and unquestionably.

Where has this Pontifical Right gone nowadays? Anyone know?

The Pope has no secular power or authority.  If he ever believed he had such power, he was overstretching his authority, definitely.

May I ask your belief(s) concerning State-Church relations?
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#5
Melkite, I am sincerely interested in your viewpoint.

Additionally, what do you believe about the Council of Carthage in 410 invoking Imperial State-Coercion against heretics and the nullification of the edict of tolerance?
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#6
Dear Melkite, what do you think of the following words from Eusebios in his Demonstration of the Gospel?

"Two ways of life were thus given by the law of Christ to His Church.

The one is above nature, and beyond common human living; it admits not marriage, child-bearing, property nor the possession of wealth, but wholly and permanently separate from the common customary life of mankind, it devotes itself to the service of God alone in its wealth of heavenly love! And they who enter on this course, appear to die to the life of mortals, to bear with them nothing earthly but their body, and in mind and spirit to have passed to heaven. Like some celestial beings they gaze upon human life, performing the duty of a priesthood to Almighty God for the whole race, not with sacrifices of bulls and blood, nor with libations and unguents, nor with smoke and consuming fire and destruction of bodily things, but with right principles of true holiness, and of a soul purified in disposition, and above all with virtuous deeds and words; with such they propitiate the Divinity, and celebrate their priestly rites for themselves and their race. Such then is the perfect form of the Christian life.

And the other more humble, more human, permits men to join in pure nuptials and to produce children, to undertake government, to give orders to soldiers fighting for right; it allows them to have minds for farming, for trade, and the other more secular interests as well as for religion: and it is for them that times of retreat and instruction, and days for hearing sacred things are set apart. And a kind of secondary grade of piety is attributed to them, giving just such help as such lives require, so that all men, whether Greeks or barbarians, have their part in the coming of salvation, and profit by the teaching of the Gospel."

How do you view this? Do you believe both the Just Warrior and the Sacral Religious both can play a role in sacred history? Do you believe clerics, monks and Bishops should pray for the success of Christian Potentates and their armies?
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#7
(10-01-2011, 07:44 AM)Sabbathiel Wrote:
(10-01-2011, 06:42 AM)Melkite Wrote:
(10-01-2011, 04:25 AM)Sabbathiel Wrote: According to the Dictatus Papae of Pope St. Gregory VII, yes he does. Fully and totally and unquestionably.

Where has this Pontifical Right gone nowadays? Anyone know?

The Pope has no secular power or authority.  If he ever believed he had such power, he was overstretching his authority, definitely.

May I ask your belief(s) concerning State-Church relations?

I'm happy to tell you my thoughts, but that's a broad question, can you be more specific?
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#8
I don't know, but if the pope can topple governments, he can do just about anything: imagine a papal bull that trust-busts large corporations like Microsoft. Or perhaps a papal tax placed on all Internet connections exceeding a certain bandwidth... to pay for restorations of Saint Peter's, of course.
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#9
(10-01-2011, 01:26 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: I don't know, but if the pope can topple governments, he can do just about anything: imagine a papal bull that trust-busts large corporations like Microsoft. Or perhaps a papal tax placed on all Internet connections exceeding a certain bandwidth... to pay for restorations of Saint Peter's, of course.

The Pope could tell Catholics that they are no longer bound by allegiance to their rulers, correct? Such as when Saint Pope Pius the Great did just that regarding Queen Elizabeth I?
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#10
The Pope can certainly declare political leaders to be not-Catholic. In Elizabeth's case, she was an illegitimate heir by our standards. What Pope Saint Pius the Great did made enough sense, but to take absolute papal powerocer the secular arm to its logical extent... could the pope declare that the real King of the UK is in Liechtenstein, and eddy monarch since James II has been illegitimate, nullifying 300 years of constitutional law? It's something to think about.
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