Conformity via Tattoos
#11
(11-28-2011, 08:22 PM)joe17 Wrote: I just thought that I would add that tattoo's, or the legalisation of them can be shown to have bad consequences.  I bring this up because my home state did not permit legal tattoo parlors until about the year 2000.  Before then, yes, of course there were people who lived in this state who had tattoos.  But,  they, for the most part, had to go elswhere to get them.  By that being the case,  the number of young people getting tattoos(early 20's and under crowd) was much less.  If you pay attention out there, the prolifigation is easily noticeable.  When I was younger, the numbers for young people just were not so high.  Now,  whether it is a few letters on the wrist/neck, or a tiger or some other image elsewhere, it is for everyone to see and you are stuck for it, for the most part for life.
 If the state had them still outlawed, then many of the people would not have them and not have to face the embarassment of the things later in life.  An example of how the government can actually safeguard her charges.
Don't go and mark up your body.  If you are a Christian, then you are a temple of the Holy Ghost.  
The only true indelible marks I would care to have is the baptismal and confirmation marks(if a priest, that one too!)
 I don't condemn anyone that may have gotten one in the past that did not no any better.  Move on.  I would not advise anyone to go out and get one though.

Joe

Very sane words, Joe. Thanks for weighing in.
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#12
My basic thoughts are these:

- Nothing wrong with them in themselves. I see them as a form of bodily ornamentation, like clothing, eye shadow, haircolor and style, etc.
- I personally find them abhorrent. I just never have liked them, and think they uglify the body. I am probably negatively biased because my sister got bad ones, and got stuck with years of painful removal.
- Since they are somewhat permanent, extreme caution and foresight should be exercised before getting one.
- I think they should be concealed under clothing. I don't care if you have one, but they should always be in places where they are your personal thing, not a public thing. Just part of the ethic of appearing nicely groomed/dressed in public.
- I think the mass trend of tattooing is a sign of our insistent search for meaning and belonging even in the midst of diabolic disorientation.
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#13
I have a tattoo on my inner left bicep of St. Thomas the Apostle. He is my favourite saint. My name is Thomas, I'm pretty negative and I look to him for inspiration when it comes to faith. I'm also going to get another tattoo of the Petrine cross on the right side of my ribs.
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#14
(11-28-2011, 09:27 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: My basic thoughts are these:

- Nothing wrong with them in themselves. I see them as a form of bodily ornamentation, like clothing, eye shadow, haircolor and style, etc.
- I personally find them abhorrent. I just never have liked them, and think they uglify the body. I am probably negatively biased because my sister got bad ones, and got stuck with years of painful removal.
- Since they are somewhat permanent, extreme caution and foresight should be exercised before getting one.
- I think they should be concealed under clothing. I don't care if you have one, but they should always be in places where they are your personal thing, not a public thing. Just part of the ethic of appearing nicely groomed/dressed in public.
- I think the mass trend of tattooing is a sign of our insistent search for meaning and belonging even in the midst of diabolic disorientation.

So a middle aged man with a spiderweb tattooed to his face is a bad thing? :eyeroll:
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#15
(11-28-2011, 07:54 PM)The Curt Jester Wrote: I remember watching part of some documentary on Japan and how they used to use tattoos to mark criminals.   The criminals started getting more and more to hide the original tattoos.  

That is not an accurate depiction of the history of irezumi.

And Jackson, if you don't want 'em don't get 'em. But the Church hasn't forbid them, so don't criticise me for having 'em.
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#16
(11-28-2011, 11:13 PM)Arun Wrote: And Jackson, if you don't want 'em don't get 'em. But the Church hasn't forbid them, so don't criticise me for having 'em.

Theology isn't needed to see that today's mass branding phenomenon is to be rejected. See this essay:

http://www.newcriterion.com/articles.cfm...ymple-2647

This bumper sticker will amuse you:

http://www.zazzle.com/got_tattoos_moooo_...3644752580
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#17
When I was younger I thought of getting one but decided against it and now I'm glad I never did. That being said I don't have anything against them. I had friends (back then) that got stuff like the baphomet in the pentagram, death metal band names, demons and evening flying slices of pizza. All I could think about was that these were going to be permanant and the very fact that they could never come off made me never want one. Imagine getting a demon's head inside a pentagram or an upside down crucifix and then leaving behind that evil metal scene and becoming a Christian and realizing you will literally have something demonic etched into your skin forever? I still wonder if that guy with the demons ever regretted all that. It makes me shudder to think about.
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#18
(11-28-2011, 11:21 PM)Jackson K. Eskew Wrote:
(11-28-2011, 11:13 PM)Arun Wrote: And Jackson, if you don't want 'em don't get 'em. But the Church hasn't forbid them, so don't criticise me for having 'em.

Theology isn't needed to see that today's mass branding phenomenon is to be rejected.

I realise it is most likely that I am the first and only working class man you have ever really encountered, and so my thoughts may seem strange to you but if theology doesn't back it up then what obligation is it you think that I ought to be under to believe your opinion?

As for the essay, what makes you think I haven't heard any of that before>?
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#19
Haha I'd be pretty depressed if I got a band tattoo back when I was 16. I was a gigantic Misfits fan and wanted the Crimson Ghost skull logo but quickly decided against it once the band reformed after 20 years with a new singer and new outlook on mainstream popularity. Yep, glad that I didn't do it.
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#20
Even though I don't like tattoos, I have always found the "temple of the Holy Ghost" argument quite weak. Our ideas about tattoos are formed based on cultural mores and norms. A hundred years from now, it may well be that Catholic America may have an almost universal fashion of tasteful tattoos. Who knows! I know that they are becoming more mainstream, and I've seen some that are genuinely nice art. Why even be cop about it?
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