Conformity via Tattoos
#21
I find the thought of someone getting a hideous tattoo in their younger years and later regretting it in old age to be incredibly amusing.  How else will the stupid learn anything if they don't do stupid things?  Ponder that for a moment.
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#22
(11-28-2011, 11:36 PM)MorganHiver Wrote: Haha I'd be pretty depressed if I got a band tattoo back when I was 16. I was a gigantic Misfits fan and wanted the Crimson Ghost skull logo but quickly decided against it once the band reformed after 20 years with a new singer and new outlook on mainstream popularity. Yep, glad that I didn't do it.

The tattooist that did most of my visible art was pretty ethical like that. There was a lotta stuff he wouldn't do on people, especially younger folk, and he had a lot of advice to give about forward thinking.

A tattoo doesn't come off, so it does pay to only get one if it bears a significance that isn't likely to change...
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#23
(11-28-2011, 11:33 PM)Arun Wrote: I realise it is most likely that I am the first and only working class man you have ever really encountered, and so my thoughts may seem strange to you

Not at all! They're the thoughts of the world. Moreover, tattoos have long been associated with soldiers, criminals, savages, and the working class. Two of my favorite relatives - a grandfather and an uncle - had tattoos. They got them when they were both soldiers and working class. What's new, and what I reject, is the embrace of this barbarism by those to whom - before today's race to the bottom - it was previously alien.

I see that I'm letting myself get sucked into argument about this. But I promised not to! So now I'll just lurk.
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#24
I'm not getting into the debate over tattoos, but the fact that our opinions about tattoos are shaped by culturally-particular standards does not mean that they are irrelevant. This obsession with the universal over the particular and downplaying of the role of culture is really specific to the modern West, so it is just as culturally specific as anything else. You can't escape culture, so dismissing certain practices or beliefs because they are rooted in a certain culture is always arbitrary. Obviously, Christ transcends culture, but even then, our experience of the universal is mediated through the particular.
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#25
(11-28-2011, 11:50 PM)Jackson K. Eskew Wrote: Moreover, tattoos have long been associated with soldiers, criminals, savages, and the working class.

Three, out of four ain't bad...

Nothing wrong with a little ink.
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#26
(11-28-2011, 11:38 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: tasteful tattoos.

This is as oxymoronic as the ridiculous term tattoo artist.
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#27
(11-28-2011, 11:56 PM)Jackson K. Eskew Wrote:
(11-28-2011, 11:38 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: tasteful tattoos.

This is as oxymoronic as the ridiculous term tattoo artist.

the level of quality some of today's tattooists can produce rivals even high art in some of the best cases. it ain't like it was in the 20s that's for sure...
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#28
for the record I am dead against people getting "stamps" or flash art taken straight of a wall. a tattoo should be a permanent and personalised piece of art, not some tacky piece of shite that 20 other people are walking around with too...

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#29
Tattoo artists ARE artists. One of my good friends is amazingly talented. Paint, pencil, spray paint, etc... He did my Didymus piece and it looks very much like a vintage icon.
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#30
(11-29-2011, 12:05 AM)Arun Wrote: for the record I am dead against people getting "stamps" or flash art taken straight of a wall. a tattoo should be a permanent and personalised piece of art, not some tacky piece of shite that 20 other people are walking around with too...

+1 Fish Stew for you!  I guarantee no one else on the planet has the same tat as I do.  Nor will they.  A couple of people wanted the one I got and the artist said no way.  Each has to have his own and he burned the drawing.  He wasn't being nasty, he just knew it has special meaning to me.  Mine brings me closer to God by reminding me that I have to carry my cross, one way or another.  I can't run from it.  I need to learn to love it.  Not all tats are bad and not all tats are good, Mr. Eskew.

Oh, and I waited until my 40s to get one, so I already know what it will look like when I get old.  :LOL:
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