Why the Poor?
#1
Friends :hello!:

There is no reason to quote specific passages wherein our Lord tells us to love the poor and be with them. Why, though, are we always told to love the poor specifically?

St. Vincent de Paul said there has never been a saint who did not have great love for the poor. Is it because of their misery? Is it in order to make the charitable man humble? Are we to liberate them from their poverty by forcing them to work, or is it broad? By "poor" does He always mean physically? "Blessed are the poor in spirit" is a beatitude, and "the poor have the good news preached to them" is a precondition of the Coming of the Messiah. He fulfilled both, but what is meant? Any good saints' quotes for this?

Social justice not allowed! In fact, there is no such thing as social justice. It mostly just keeps the financially-poor in their place so we can exercise 'charity' over them, but love them not one ounce. Is it primarily spiritual, physical, emotional, moral, health-wise? Is it all these? He speaks of the poor so often...
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#2
I think one reason is the poor have less leisure to engage in spiritual ventures, and are more bound to their work and their master (whoever that may be). If we aid them, we may help them be able to engage in spiritual things. Also I think the poor have the highest percentage of people who are spiritually down and out. Sure every class has them, but people who usually hit spiritual rock bottom have a correlating rock bottom in their financial state.
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#3
Many during the time of Christ believed there was a relation between one's social standing and one's holiness.  Thus, many pharisees condemned the poor as sinners on the grounds that they were poor and thus God must hate them.  In contrary the wealthy must be loved by God because they were wealthy. 

Christ in praising the poor was shattering this type of thinking. 
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#4
Three ways to look at this...

God is close to the poor, the widow and the orphan, the sick and the suffering, because they symbolize in their bodies, in their very lives, the soul's need for God. He is our food, our husband, our father, our physician, the Source of life. In reality, we are all born “poor” and in need of God's grace.

Poverty of soul, in the context of the beatitudes, means to be unattached to material things, so that God fills the soul. It means dependence on God for one's true happiness. The rich man can too easily fall into depending on his material wealth to make him happy. 

To care for the poor and less fortunate is living the second of the two great commandments: love of neighbor. Those who have more give to those who have less. As Jesus poured out his life for all of us, we should follow his example by generous giving.
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#5
Because they are always with us.
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#6
What the poor in spirit and the poor share in common is that the passing world does not effect them, much. If you're broke you're not scheming to make more do-re-mi, and conquer the ant hill, but turn your eyes to God for help. It affords you the time and ability to turn your attention to Him. If you're not sure of where the next meal is coming, we turn to God for help. It fosters a continuous relationship with the Lord. Of course this implies that you have faith. In a way it is complete recognition that we can do nothing without God. The poor for his next meal or a new icebox,and the poor in spirit knowing he is only steward of God's property.

tim
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#7
Lovely answers... thank you brethren. :)
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#8
Now that you've gotten your answer, time to turn this thread silly....

"Haven't you met the poor?"

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#9
(12-01-2011, 05:07 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: Many during the time of Christ believed there was a relation between one's social standing and one's holiness.  Thus, many pharisees condemned the poor as sinners on the grounds that they were poor and thus God must hate them.  In contrary the wealthy must be loved by God because they were wealthy. 

Christ in praising the poor was shattering this type of thinking. 

And then the Lutherans resurrected this diabolical worldview...

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#10
(12-01-2011, 06:58 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(12-01-2011, 05:07 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: Many during the time of Christ believed there was a relation between one's social standing and one's holiness.  Thus, many pharisees condemned the poor as sinners on the grounds that they were poor and thus God must hate them.  In contrary the wealthy must be loved by God because they were wealthy. 

Christ in praising the poor was shattering this type of thinking. 

And then the Lutherans resurrected this diabolical worldview...

Well, Luther had to do something to stay on the good side of those German princes.  Otherwise, he would have ended up a crispy critter...
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