Rabbi has problem with Tim Tebow
#81
(12-26-2011, 10:00 AM)alaric Wrote:
(12-22-2011, 07:24 PM)Walty Wrote:
(12-22-2011, 07:20 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: The rabbi attacked Christianity as a whole.

He didn't attack Tebow for being an Evangelical Christian specifically. Rather, he attacked him because Tebow isn't afraid of His faith in Christ and the rabbi fears "people of certainty," in other words, a revival of Christianity.

I don't think that's the case.  Most of Tebow's strongest critics are condemning the annoying overtness of his religiousity, not the fact that he's religious at all.  There are a lot of religious athletes in America, many of them very popular. 
If a black athlete gave all praise and honor to Allah you wouldn't hear a peep from the rabbi or the MSM.

I've heard more black athletes praise Jesus than Allah.
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#82
(12-26-2011, 04:17 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(12-26-2011, 10:00 AM)alaric Wrote:
(12-22-2011, 07:24 PM)Walty Wrote:
(12-22-2011, 07:20 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: The rabbi attacked Christianity as a whole.

He didn't attack Tebow for being an Evangelical Christian specifically. Rather, he attacked him because Tebow isn't afraid of His faith in Christ and the rabbi fears "people of certainty," in other words, a revival of Christianity.

I don't think that's the case.  Most of Tebow's strongest critics are condemning the annoying overtness of his religiousity, not the fact that he's religious at all.  There are a lot of religious athletes in America, many of them very popular. 
If a black athlete gave all praise and honor to Allah you wouldn't hear a peep from the rabbi or the MSM.

I've heard more black athletes praise Jesus than Allah.

Thanks be to God. And I think it is cool when athletes do so. I used it as teaching moments with my children when they were at younger and more tender ages.

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#83
(12-26-2011, 03:49 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: I have a problem with the rabbi.

Hey, you stole my post!  Read the thread! 

:grin:

Yeah, really, when are the Pharisees going to lay off of Christianity.  Probably when the guy they crucified shows up again.
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#84
(12-27-2011, 04:05 AM)Norbert Wrote:
(12-26-2011, 03:49 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: I have a problem with the rabbi.

Hey, you stole my post!  Read the thread! 

:grin:

Yeah, really, when are the Pharisees going to lay off of Christianity.  Probably when the guy they crucified shows up again.
Nobody cares what catholics think.....lol
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#85
(12-26-2011, 06:50 PM)Adam Wayne Wrote:
(12-26-2011, 04:17 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(12-26-2011, 10:00 AM)alaric Wrote:
(12-22-2011, 07:24 PM)Walty Wrote:
(12-22-2011, 07:20 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: The rabbi attacked Christianity as a whole.

He didn't attack Tebow for being an Evangelical Christian specifically. Rather, he attacked him because Tebow isn't afraid of His faith in Christ and the rabbi fears "people of certainty," in other words, a revival of Christianity.

I don't think that's the case.  Most of Tebow's strongest critics are condemning the annoying overtness of his religiousity, not the fact that he's religious at all.  There are a lot of religious athletes in America, many of them very popular. 
If a black athlete gave all praise and honor to Allah you wouldn't hear a peep from the rabbi or the MSM.

I've heard more black athletes praise Jesus than Allah.

Thanks be to God. And I think it is cool when athletes do so. I used it as teaching moments with my children when they were at younger and more tender ages.

I remember watching the NBA finals with an atheist friend.  Both of us were rooting for the Dallas Mavericks.  After they won, a reporter stuck a microphone in Jason Terry's face and he gave the glory to Jesus.  I thought it was great and told my friend. 

The more the Holy Name of Our Lord Jesus Christ is spoken in positive ways publicly by athletes or other people who are admired, the better it is for the culture as a whole.  Kids who see it will think it is okay to talk about Jesus.  Perhaps my atheist friend was affected in some way by the fact that the guy he was rooting for glorified Jesus Christ.

This is what frightens to death the synagogue of Satan.  It is nothing else than that they still have to occasionally hear that Name, the Name which their forefathers commanded the Apostles never to speak again, the Name which they have been blaspheming and attempting to stamp out for 2000 years. 
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#86
(12-16-2011, 07:54 AM)Walty Wrote: I'm not a big fan of Tebow.  I don't hate him as many do, but I certainly don't like him.  As far as being a big football fan, it's annoying that this has all happened.  I still don't believe that he will have consistent success in the NFL or that he has very many of the attributes needed to be an NFL QB.  Everything about his throw is messed up.  Denver is running this year's version of the Wildcat.  Once teams have the tape and experience to clue in on the novelty of having him behind center they will destroy him.  If you shut down his capability to run and make him pass all game, defenses are going to have a field day week in and week out.  The Tim Tebow train won't go further than this season (and most likely no further than the first round of the playoffs).  I expect them to lose to New England this week, a sign that, even with Tebow still catching defenses by surprise, the Broncos can't beat any real contenders.  Let's also not forget how well the Bronco's defense has been playing or how games don't get won unless kicker Matt Prater is out there to kick 51 and 59 yard field goals to win games.

As far as his religious persona, it is nice to know there's a professional athlete out there who loves Jesus Christ, but I fear that his style is doing more harm for Christianity than good.  The Tim Tebow story has brought out some other athletes to admit that they're devout Christians, but that they believe Tebow is too showy about it.  Some of these guys probably do just as much charitable work and spend as much time in church, but they're not megaphoning in their faith on every play.  Tebow wears Christianity on his sleeve.  Again, he makes his entire religion look like a show, and he makes absolutely certain that no one forgets that he is a Christian.  Is that how we're called to live?

He's also an Evangelical, furthering their stereotypical brand of Christianity as THE Christianity.  How many atheists exist because they're too smart to deeply respect non-denominational Evangelicism?  How many would be Christians if traditional Catholicism could be presented to them as an alternative and, indeed, the genuine and legitimate instantiation of Christianity?

Hello, Mr. Bayless, welcome to the forum, didn't know you were a traditional catholic. :P
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#87
(12-15-2011, 01:04 AM)Adam Wayne Wrote:   The worldwide struggle going on right now is not between good and evil, but between certainty and doubt. 

I found this line to be the most interesting in the rabbi's essay. 

If the struggle is not between good and evil, then certainty and doubt are on an equal moral footing.  Under this view, what does it matter which side wins?  Curious.
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