What YEAR did America start implementing the NO mass??
#21
(01-06-2012, 04:55 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-06-2012, 04:43 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Do you remember any holdouts? Priests trying to keep things as traditional as they could?

Fr Michael Moriarity, Pastor of St John the Evangelist Parish in Lawrence, KS. He clung to the Latin, even in the NOM as long as he could. When the vernacular was 'mandated', he began celebrating the Latin NOM in the school gym at the same time his curate was celebrating in English in the Church. That way, no one could complain that they were being 'deprived' of the vernacular. Since the majority of parishioners were in the gym, the Archbishop transferred Father to a smaller parish where he didn't have a curate.

He and his brother, Pastor of Assumption Parish in Topeka, were from the Ould Sod in the days when Ireland was producing more priests than they could use. Good men and holy, devout priests. May they both Rest in Peace!

God Bless them, and may they rest in peace.
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#22
Tim, that was a great story.

As most people here probably have, the is a great video of a Solemn High Mass on YouTube, from Easter 1941. Fr. Tommaso must have been from the same cloth as the Servites in that church.

Like the video, look at what we have lost, and the road to restoration.
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#23
Quote: Tim, Lisa, Jovan, et al

Was the 1965 missal that bad? I mean, people who were around said the changes started happening in '64. When did you start realizing it was like a revolution, and the Mass of your childhood had radically transformed? 1968? 1969?

I made my First Communion (1963) and Confirmation (1965) when the Mass was still entirely in Latin. When I entered 5th grade the “changes” were all the talk..Advent of 1966 they were implemented in my parish and that would be the "revolution." Like I was saying earlier, we were more shocked that parts of the text were in the vernacular over what the text actually said. We still said the Kyrie (Greek), and the Gloria, Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin. By late 1967/68 we were saying those in English too. New missalettes were published every year so we could keep up with the changes. By the time the Novus Ordo Mass came I was a freshman in high school, and I could not see a huge difference, as “we” were already used to the gradual yet constant changes. You have to give me some slack, as I was a bubble head at the time.

Communion in the hand, under both species, were introduced in the late 70s in our archdiocese (although again my mind is fuzzy on this one because I was not regularly attending Mass then). In the 1980s came Extraordinary Ministers of the Eucharist, in the 1990s came altar girls. I have seen it all.
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#24
(01-06-2012, 07:05 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:
Quote: Tim, Lisa, Jovan, et al

Was the 1965 missal that bad? I mean, people who were around said the changes started happening in '64. When did you start realizing it was like a revolution, and the Mass of your childhood had radically transformed? 1968? 1969?

I made my First Communion (1963) and Confirmation (1965) when the Mass was still entirely in Latin. When I entered 5th grade the “changes” were all the talk..Advent of 1966 they were implemented in my parish and that would be the "revolution." Like I was saying earlier, we were more shocked that parts of the text were in the vernacular over what the text actually said. We still said the Kyrie (Greek), and the Gloria, Sanctus and Agnus Dei in Latin. By late 1967/68 we were saying those in English too. New missalettes were published every year so we could keep up with the changes. By the time the Novus Ordo Mass came I was a freshman in high school, and I could not see a huge difference, as “we” were already used to the gradual yet constant changes. You have to give me some slack, as I was a bubble head at the time.

Communion in the hand, under both species, were introduced in the late 70s in our archdiocese (although again my mind is fuzzy on this one because I was not regularly attending Mass then). In the 1980s came Extraordinary Ministers of the Eucharist, in the 1990s came altar girls. I have seen it all.

This sounds familiar from what I heard from others. My mom, who received her First Communion and in the tongue, did so maybe in 68 or 69.
She also said she remembers everyone just started communion in the hand in like 1976. If I looked at Masses at my high school in the early 80s, there were EMOHC, but everyone was still receiving on the tongue.

Thanks Lisa for the info. I consider it especial valuable for those my age, born well after the changes.
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#25
(01-06-2012, 06:18 PM)Revixit Wrote:
(01-06-2012, 06:15 PM)Tim Wrote: I like it, too !  It sort of stands in opposition to the John Paul II generation we used to hear a lot. You are a "A", too !

tim

Yep!  You and I will both be 65 in 2012, I think.  It's good to be on the A Team, right?

That makes 3 of us! July the Fifth for me!
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#26
(01-06-2012, 05:52 PM)Tim Wrote: At the Church of the Assumption here in Chicago, and Jovann, knows this Church, Fr. Tomaso Ferrazi held out.

True! Many of the Servites were solid in those days! I was a member of the Confraternity of OL of Sorrows and had a good deal to do with them!
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