Reading Brideshead Revisited
#11
(01-13-2012, 12:38 PM)Filipino Catholic Wrote: i was just wondering, was "bromance" very common during that period especially in an all male atmosphere like Oxford back then?

I believe so. I believe that it is practically confirmed that Waugh had some type of romance with the real-life Sebastian character(s). While the book doesn't explore the explicit nature of whether this involved sexual activity, it is quite clear in the book that Waugh is saying this was common amongst his set. C.S. Lewis, himself a product of this environment, says that homosexual love is perverted storge (see link below). I take it for what it is, on face value as what he states, and don't delve too far into whatever was in his mind. I think what he gives is sufficient to draw out what Waugh intends to convey. There are deep levels to the book, including the symbolism of Brideshead as a place, how it is taken over by the army, etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brideshead_...lationship
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storge

(01-13-2012, 12:52 PM)FHM310 Wrote: HOWEVER, those who haven't seen it should be warned, there are some scenes which ...  well, I personally wish weren't in it, and many Traditional Catholics might want to be warned.  If you don't mind seeing a few male butt shots, then you can probably watch the whole movie safely, except on the ship, when Julia says, "yes, now" or something like that, you might want to skip to the next scene.

Yes, I did forget that. It was gratuitous, although mild by today's standards. In the book, he does "pan away" from the scene, but the language is rather symbolic, and a wandering mind can connect the dots. The one scene in the mini-series doesn't negate its value overall, and it can be skipped if you move ahead maybe a minute or so.
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#12
(01-13-2012, 02:46 PM)moneil Wrote: As everyone else has said READ THE BOOK.

Here is a bit about the author [url] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evelyn_Waugh[/ul]
Quote: Waugh had converted to Roman Catholicism in 1930, after the failure of his first marriage. His traditionalist stance led him to oppose strongly all attempts to reform the Church; the changes brought about in the wake of the Second Vatican Council of 1962–65, particularly the introduction of the vernacular Mass, greatly disturbed him.

Amazingly I have seen Brideshead Revisited trashed on other “traditionalist” forums as “homo pornography” which is absurd.  A great theme of Catholic thought is the redemption of our fallen human nature by grace.  A favorite scripture is Romans 5:20 20 Now the law entered in that sin might abound. And where sin abounded, grace did more abound. (Douay-Rheims).

I’m no literary critic, not even a very literary person, but it would seem that to speak of grace’s impact one needs to speak of the fallen nature it is impacting.  The fact that Waugh does that somewhat graphically makes this work all the more powerful, in my humble opinion.  He also doesn’t give us sanguine sanitized conversion stories, they are all rather messy and one is still left with the impulse to flood heaven imploring God’s mercy in the particular cases (another great theme in Catholicism).

In chronological order I read the book, watched the mini-series, and saw the movie, with a distance of a few years between each.  I personally didn’t think the movie was as bad or “unfaithful to the original” as most here seem to think.  Obviously condensing a 350 page novel or an 11 hour mini-series into a 2 hour cinema requires some abridgement and in my memory of the novel and the mini-series I still thought the film caught the essence, but mine appears to be a minority view here.  If you can access it certainly the eleven hour BBC mini-series is going to be complete.  If one does watch the move I would defiantly recommend reading the book before hand.

(01-13-2012, 12:38 PM)Filipino Catholic Wrote: i was just wondering, was "bromance" very common during that period especially in an all male atmosphere like Oxford back then?

From a very few allusions I recall from some readings (and as I’ve mentioned I’m not very literary), and I have a very vague memory of a memoir I once read, in perhaps the New Yorker back in the 1970’s, (and I would have no idea who the author was or the title of the piece) I have the impression that this wasn’t un common, but no idea how prevalent the phenomena may have been.  Back then there seemed to be some emphasis on keeping the adolescent and young adult genders separate before marriage, except under very controlled circumstances.  There seemed to be some thought that these types of “bromances”, as long as they were fleeting, were preferable to a young gentleman “getting a girl in trouble” or seemingly worse, becoming smitten by the parlor maid and wanting to marry beneath his station in life.  The fact that Waugh included this element in his work perhaps lends credence to this but I’m uncertain as to what the actual sociological data is.

An excellent work by a Catholic author. I've read it and have seen the mini series – enjoyed both!

Your point about "Brideshead" being trashed on other "traditionalist" forums just goes to show how sick and twisted some pseudo Catholics really are. In reality they are generally a part of the lunatic fringe that gives Catholics a bad name or are  "wanna be's" who have never made anything of themselves in this life and get off judging the intentions of everyone else who has lived, is currently living, or will live! You might even find them among the "busybodies at Mass" mentioned in another thread. They are nothing but sanctimonious blowhards!
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#13
I read the book a few years back and found that I probably needed some kind of discussion group to get everything I could out of it.  Perhaps I should revisit it.

Any chance that the mini-series will eventually be available via Netflix streaming?  :grin:
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#14
So what is the book about? Is it a late Anglo Bildungsroman?
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#15
(01-13-2012, 05:14 PM)Pilgrim Wrote: I read the book a few years back and found that I probably needed some kind of discussion group to get everything I could out of it.  Perhaps I should revisit it.

Any chance that the mini-series will eventually be available via Netflix streaming?  :grin:



:) Revisiting Brideshead Revisited  :grin:


i've just found out that the entire miniseries is on youtube!!
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#16
(01-14-2012, 04:33 AM)Filipino Catholic Wrote: :) Revisiting Brideshead Revisited  :grin:

I walked right into that one...  :LOL:
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#17
[Image: tumblr_lrdo2sUvUT1r0k077o1_500.jpg]

i found the above photo online. I just couldn't stop  :LOL: at the teddy bear .  :)
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