MARIJUANA
#31
(01-20-2012, 12:21 AM)Josué Wrote:
(01-19-2012, 09:35 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote:
(01-19-2012, 09:24 PM)Josué Wrote: I think we got a new Church movment here ^^^  the phillybros > diamond brothers

Sorry Josué I'm an only child. :grin:

brother in christ?  :safe:

Of course brother!
Reply
#32
(01-20-2012, 12:22 AM)Walty Wrote: I know this may come as a shocker but I've never smoked pot.  

My equilibrium has been shattered.
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
Reply
#33
I can only say as a former smoker of MaryJane [for about 5 years fairly heavy] that for the first several years I had no more proplems than drinking several drinks, but near the end I would get ridiculously paranoid.
Maybe there are those who get very paranoid from MJ that do not get this way from a couple of drinks, and this paranoia and the hallucinogenic way it affects some minds is reason to consider its illegality.
From my experience I can deal with  reality pretty well on 4 or 5 Sierra Nevadas, but I had a hard time doing anything but huddle in someones basement listening to Moody Blues records for several hours after smoking some chocolate thai stick.
Reply
#34
(01-20-2012, 12:43 AM)Old Salt Wrote: I can only say as a former smoker of MaryJane [for about 5 years fairly heavy] that for the first several years I had no more proplems than drinking several drinks, but near the end I would get ridiculously paranoid.

I know of a person who smokes the stuff and gets the same way - ridiculously paranoid.
Reply
#35
(01-19-2012, 08:43 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I was a heavy pot smoker back in high school and based on my own experiences with it I wouldn't want it freely available but I do admit it is not physically addictive the way alcohol is. It can be very psychologically addictive, at least it was for me. It became a huge crutch and I felt like I had to be high all the time to function. It also messes with your mind quite a lot, especially when you are high all the time. There were moments when I had to ask myself what being sober even felt like anymore.  Whoever said you can take a few puffs and not be impaired is right though. The weird mental effects do not really happen at low doses. Perhaps it ought to be legalized for, say, medical reasons, provided there are actually legitimate ones. I know some folks want it to stimulate appetite in chemo patients and to reduce intra-ocular pressure in those with glaucoma.
I also remember feeling very depressed a lot after smoking it for a year or so and feeling that it was a crutch and I needed it to escape the depressed feeling.
I realize the same thing can happen with alcohol abuse, but this was a different state of mind, almost a clouded perception of life when I was sober and a slowness in reaction time when I was also sober.
A certain sadness that I never felt from alcohol use the night before. It got to be a lot more dangerous for me now that I look back.
Reply
#36
(01-19-2012, 07:59 PM)kayla_veronica Wrote:
(01-19-2012, 07:50 PM)su Wrote: If it were up to me, I'd make all substances legal as long as the substance is properly marked (that is, if one is selling marijuana and crack brownies, then that must be clearly disclosed). For people of legal age, defined by the age they take on legal responsibility, they can do as they please, but they must accept all consequences of their choice. If one gets drunk and kills someone with an automobile, the intent of the act is defined by the intent of the substance intake. Did they intend to drink that substance and know what it could do? Then all acts resulting from that choice have the intent of the initial intoxicating act. If people smoke something and get health problems, the costs are all on the individual. Insurance companies and doctors can charge as much as they please, but it would be illegal to put those costs on other people.

It would be really hard to prove which health problems were caused by the drug and which were not. Most diseases people get from taking drugs can also be found in people who have never taken any drugs.

Well, I would put the burden of burden of proof in the hand of the person who decides to use the substance.

After all, if I habitually use a substance and I get an ill effect which is strongly associated with that substance, I can hardly expect to have other people foot my bills just because there can be shadow of doubt. If one is burned, and known to habitually walk on fire, it must be proven that the habit was not the cause of the burn.

If one takes the risk, one has to actually take the risk.

Basically, I am sick of the entitlement recreational drug users expect to receive. Lack of one's fix is not an excuse to be less civil or to take extra breaks at work, or otherwise expect others to care about how one is privately abusing their body and mind.
Reply
#37
(01-19-2012, 07:57 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Okay. But what about penalties. I strong argument can be made that we are not morally bound to pay Federal income tax, but that it would foolish to not do so, as we would face harsh penal punishment (time in a Federal penitentiary.) What say su?

Paying federal income tax is not immoral to do, therefore, we are bound to do it.

Penalties are not the issue. Are we animals to be conditioned?
Reply
#38
(01-19-2012, 08:43 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: I was a heavy pot smoker back in high school and based on my own experiences with it I wouldn't want it freely available but I do admit it is not physically addictive the way alcohol is. It can be very psychologically addictive, at least it was for me. It became a huge crutch and I felt like I had to be high all the time to function. It also messes with your mind quite a lot, especially when you are high all the time. There were moments when I had to ask myself what being sober even felt like anymore.  Whoever said you can take a few puffs and not be impaired is right though. The weird mental effects do not really happen at low doses. Perhaps it ought to be legalized for, say, medical reasons, provided there are actually legitimate ones. I know some folks want it to stimulate appetite in chemo patients and to reduce intra-ocular pressure in those with glaucoma.

(01-19-2012, 09:51 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-19-2012, 06:55 PM)Josué Wrote: we don't even know what it does to the mind!  it's dangerous and a mortal sin for a reason

There are studies going back to the India Hemp Drugs Commission Report (1894) and the LaGuardia Committee Report (1944), prepared by the New York Academy of Medicine, showing that it is not dangerous. The 1894 report even specifically addressed moral issues and came to the conclusion that moderate use had no effect on the moral character of the user. Excessive use, of course, like that of alcohol, is a different matter.

The fact is, and few know it or want to admit it, that marijuana was basically legal (with regulation) in the US until the repeal of alcohol Prohibition. Harry Anslinger had been head of the 'Federal Prohibition Bureau' and when it became obvious that Prohibition was going to be repealed he successfully lobbied for a Federal narcotics act and the creation of the 'Federal Narcotics Bureau', of which he became the head,  so he and his boys could stay in business.

In truth, the whole 'illegalisation' of marijuana was a power grabbing coup by Anslinger and his agency.

(01-20-2012, 12:43 AM)Old Salt Wrote: I can only say as a former smoker of MaryJane [for about 5 years fairly heavy] that for the first several years I had no more proplems than drinking several drinks, but near the end I would get ridiculously paranoid.
Maybe there are those who get very paranoid from MJ that do not get this way from a couple of drinks, and this paranoia and the hallucinogenic way it affects some minds is reason to consider its illegality.
From my experience I can deal with  reality pretty well on 4 or 5 Sierra Nevadas, but I had a hard time doing anything but huddle in someones basement listening to Moody Blues records for several hours after smoking some chocolate thai stick.

I also remember feeling very depressed a lot after smoking it for a year or so and feeling that it was a crutch and I needed it to escape the depressed feeling.
I realize the same thing can happen with alcohol abuse, but this was a different state of mind, almost a clouded perception of life when I was sober and a slowness in reaction time when I was also sober.
A certain sadness that I never felt from alcohol use the night before. It got to be a lot more dangerous for me now that I look back.

Alright, it seems here that everyone is talking about the ABUSE of marijuana.  What about MODERATE use?

It seems that all the problems being stated come from people smoking way too much, and often smoking strains of marijuana that are MUCH STRONGER (they contain much more THC) than other strains of marijuana.

Lets say, for instance, it's just "regular" pot.  The slang term when I was growing up for regular pot (again, not heavy stuff like the chronic) was "commercial". 

So, moderate use of "commercial"... what's so bad about it?  ???

Again, it's only a sin if used gluttonously and to the point of impairing judgement.
Reply
#39
I found even "moderate" use[ 1 joint a day of mild sensomelia] made my mind odd and sad.
Reply
#40
(01-20-2012, 02:58 PM)Old Salt Wrote: I found even "moderate" use[ 1 joint a day of mild sensomelia] made my mind odd and sad.

Then it's clearly not moderate use.

That, or you're a lightweight.  There are lightweights with alcohol, we don't judge the legality of all alcohol because of it's effects on lightweights.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)