A Modern Plague: Possible Chastisement Scenario
#1
Barack Obama, the alleged President, so callously and with such carefree abandon cheer abortion for the purpose of 'pursuing dreams' (read, dreams of Mammonism) on the infamous anniversary of Roe vs. Wade.

At the same time, Obama has declared that we will by law be required to subscribe to abortion and birth control services. 

The Republicans meanwhile are busying themselves on chitchat about a bland Governor's bland and toothless speech, a Governor who urged political activists to drop commitments to fighting abortion and homosexual unions.  This same Republican Party's leadership gleefully and with full smiles to complement their blow-dried hair paraded with Obama down the aisle in last night's self-serving speech.

In Church news, apparently we are to get ready for a festival celebrating Wormwood, known to his peers as Martin Luther.

My work consists of IT training so I deal with a lot of people every day, sometimes hundreds in a week.  Many people are shockingly rude, refuse to pay attention, and want others to do even minor tasks for them (like turning on their laptops, plugging in their electrical cords, etc.)  And this is at supposedly upper echelon business.

Imagine then for a moment, given the state of our selfish society, a modern plague.  Imagine how rapidly that would totally change the order of things, the carnage it would exact, and the evils that would come out of it.  Paper money would be almost meaningless as military units and militias become locked in a horrific fight against the infected to quarantine them from the healthy.

I believe that the fact we have not had any significant plague (save for AIDS which is generally limited to certain groups, and cancer which is a slow acting and generally not communicable killer) is demonstrative of the power of the Rosary and the relatively small remnant that is following Our Lady’s command.  Let us pray that God will limit His chastisement and that we will reconstitute rapidly.
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#2
(01-25-2012, 08:27 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: I believe that the fact we have not had any significant plague (save for AIDS which is generally limited to certain groups, and cancer which is a slow acting and generally not communicable killer) is demonstrative of the power of the Rosary and the relatively small remnant that is following Our Lady’s command.  Let us pray that God will limit His chastisement and that we will reconstitute rapidly.

So what you are saying is that the Rosary is the only effective vaccine out there. Hmmmm, I like it.
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#3
And if God doesn't limit his chastisement and he takes down one of your loved ones or maybe even you...what then?  That would suck.  Just sayin. 
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#4
(01-25-2012, 11:54 PM)DrBombay Wrote: And if God doesn't limit his chastisement and he takes down one of your loved ones or maybe even you...what then?  That would suck.  Just sayin. 

It would suck. But we remain faithful and know that it is His will. Easier said then done ofcourse.
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#5
I'd rather avoid a chastisement altogether.  The thing about chastisements is, the purpose is to chastise sinners.  And since I am one, well....no thank you. I don't have any desire whatsoever that this nation or world be struck down by some horrible chastisement.  What a hideous thought.
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#6
(01-26-2012, 12:16 AM)DrBombay Wrote: I'd rather avoid a chastisement altogether.  The thing about chastisements is, the purpose is to chastise sinners.  And since I am one, well....no thank you. I don't have any desire whatsoever that this nation or world be struck down by some horrible chastisement.  What a hideous thought.

Many times I wish for something to happen. When I think about all those babies being murdered in abortions, or how pedophilia is so rampant in our society, the only thing I see as a solution is Divine intervention. Kinda like in the Greek (I think) plays when the hand of God comes down and removes the problem. I am sure that if a terrible chastisement would come upon us, I would find it very difficult and wish for the good ol' days of now. But as much as a chastisement seems horrible, if we are at a point where we deserve it, it much be so much worse for God to see such sin. Not sure if I make sense...
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#7
[url=http://Pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus gives wings to avian flu

25 Jan 2012 | 18:17 GMT | Posted by Declan Butler | Category: Biology & Biotechnology, Health and medicine, Policy, Swine flu


Has the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic increased the risk that the H5N1 avian flu virus could evolve to create a human pandemic?

That’s a possibility raised by the work of Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, the main conclusions of which — but not the details — are revealed in a Comment article in Nature today. His team created a virus that has the H5 haemagglutinin (HA) surface protein from the H5N1 virus, with all the remaining genes coming from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. The resulting virus proved to be highly transmissible in ferrets, and is therefore likely to have the same behaviour in other mammals, including humans.

What’s intriguing is that before the 2009 pandemic, several research groups had tried the same experiment, using the garden-variety seasonal H1N1 flu, but without success. The difference is that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, which is a triple reassortant of pig, avian and human viruses, contains the triple reassortant gene (TRIG) cassette, which is believed to make it far easier for a flu virus to swap genes with those from other species. This suggests that H5N1 may find it much easier to reassort with pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus circulating in the wild to create a pandemic virus, whereas it had coexisted with seasonal flu since 1997 without evolving into a pandemic strain, explains Bruno Lina, a virologist and flu researcher at the CNRS, France’s basic-research agency, who works at the University of Claude Bernard Lyon-1.

The study by Kawaoka’s team, which has been accepted for publication by Nature, is one of two studies that have succeeded in creating H5N1 strains capable of transmitting between ferrets. The other, by a team led by Ron Fouchier of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, has been submitted to Science. The papers have been at the centre of controversy since 20 December, when the United States government — acting on advice from the US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) — asked both journals to publish only the main conclusions of the two flu studies, but not to reveal details. Insights from the research might help to improve pandemic preparedness in the future, but some are concerned that the publication of such work would amplify the risk of an accidental, or intentional, release of the virus that could spark a human pandemic. Flu researchers working on such studies last week declared a 60-day voluntary pause to allow governments and other bodies “time to find the best solutions for opportunities and challenges that stem from the work” (see ‘Pause on avian flu transmission studies‘).

Kawaoka and Fouchier succeeded in creating the transmissible virus in completely different ways. Fouchier used mutation, taking a H5N1 virus and then mutating it until it became transmissible. He initially introduced three mutations, using a technique called reverse genetics, but the resulting virus was not transmissible, so he then took that virus and passaged it through multiple ferrets, a procedure that is known to allow viruses to adapt to their host. The result was a virus with just five mutations, which were enough to make it highly transmissible.

Kawaoka instead used reassortment, which occurs in the wild. He took an HA protein from H5N1 and inserted it into a virus made of up genes from the pandemic 2009 H1N1. The flu virus has eight genes. Two code for the surface proteins HA and neuraminidase (NA), and six code for internal proteins. The eight genes are on separate segments, which means that when two different flu viruses infect the same host, they can swap genes and create new viruses in a process known as reassortment. An H1N1 human and H5N1 avian virus, for example, would generate a new virus that has most of the genes from the human virus, making it transmissible in humans, but an avian haemagglutinin and/or neuraminidase. A largely human virus carrying an H5, to which humans have no previous exposure of immunity, could cause a pandemic if it retained the transmissibility of the human virus, and the lethality of H5N1.

Fouchier’s virus was lethal in ferrets, whereas Kawaoka’s was “no more pathogenic than the pandemic 2009 virus”, and killed none of the animals. A reassortant that occurred in the the wild might have different pathogenicities. But two independent groups have now shown that H5N1 can transmit in ferrets, and so such human-transmissible viruses could potentially arise naturally in avian and other animal populations. What controls the exchange of genes between viruses is poorly understood, says Lina, who himself failed in the past to create highly transmissible reassortants of H5N1 and seasonal H1N1. Triple-reassortant viruses that have this TRIG cassette, of six highly conserved internal genes, seem capable of capturing various HA and NA genes from multiple species, he says. “The pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus has a flexibility of function which makes it capable of associating at the molecular level with virus and gene segments from pig, bird and humans.”

The 2009 pandemic H1N1 is circulating in humans in countries such as Indonesia, China and Egypt, where H5N1 cases in human continue to occur. Co-infection of a person with both viruses would give them opportunities to reassort. Pandemic H1N1 also infects pigs, from which it originally emerged, which could provide further opportunities for reassortment. This emphasizes the need for better surveillance to detect human cases of H5N1 infection.

Monitoring of human cases could also help to prevent flu viruses acquiring human transmissibility. There has been some evidence of limited human-to-human transmission of H5N1 in clusters of human cases, and a virus that passes along even a small chain of human hosts has opportunities to adapt to its host, just as H5N1 did in Fouchier’s ferrets.

But as a news article in this week’s edition of Nature shows (see ‘Caution urged for mutant flu work‘), surveillance of H5N1 in birds worldwide is patchy, particularly in poorer countries, where the virus is prevalent. It is also largely geared towards simply detecting and monitoring outbreaks, and few of the viral samples collected are ever sequenced, with just 160 H5N1 isolates submitted to the GenBank database last year. Moreover, if H5N1 surveillance in birds is poor, the situation is far worse in pigs, where there is virtually no systematic surveillance, even in richer countries. H5N1 infections in pigs are uncommon and cause only mild illness, creating little economic incentive to monitor them — GenBank contains partial sequences from just 24 pig H5N1 isolates in total.]Pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus gives wings to avian flu[/url]

25 Jan 2012 | 18:17 GMT | Posted by Declan Butler | Category: Biology & Biotechnology, Health and medicine, Policy, Swine flu


Has the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic increased the risk that the H5N1 avian flu virus could evolve to create a human pandemic?

That’s a possibility raised by the work of Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, the main conclusions of which — but not the details — are revealed in a Comment article in Nature today. His team created a virus that has the H5 haemagglutinin (HA) surface protein from the H5N1 virus, with all the remaining genes coming from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. The resulting virus proved to be highly transmissible in ferrets, and is therefore likely to have the same behaviour in other mammals, including humans.

What’s intriguing is that before the 2009 pandemic, several research groups had tried the same experiment, using the garden-variety seasonal H1N1 flu, but without success. The difference is that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, which is a triple reassortant of pig, avian and human viruses, contains the triple reassortant gene (TRIG) cassette, which is believed to make it far easier for a flu virus to swap genes with those from other species. This suggests that H5N1 may find it much easier to reassort with pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus circulating in the wild to create a pandemic virus, whereas it had coexisted with seasonal flu since 1997 without evolving into a pandemic strain, explains Bruno Lina, a virologist and flu researcher at the CNRS, France’s basic-research agency, who works at the University of Claude Bernard Lyon-1.

The study by Kawaoka’s team, which has been accepted for publication by Nature, is one of two studies that have succeeded in creating H5N1 strains capable of transmitting between ferrets. The other, by a team led by Ron Fouchier of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, has been submitted to Science. The papers have been at the centre of controversy since 20 December, when the United States government — acting on advice from the US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) — asked both journals to publish only the main conclusions of the two flu studies, but not to reveal details. Insights from the research might help to improve pandemic preparedness in the future, but some are concerned that the publication of such work would amplify the risk of an accidental, or intentional, release of the virus that could spark a human pandemic. Flu researchers working on such studies last week declared a 60-day voluntary pause to allow governments and other bodies “time to find the best solutions for opportunities and challenges that stem from the work” (see ‘Pause on avian flu transmission studies‘).

Kawaoka and Fouchier succeeded in creating the transmissible virus in completely different ways. Fouchier used mutation, taking a H5N1 virus and then mutating it until it became transmissible. He initially introduced three mutations, using a technique called reverse genetics, but the resulting virus was not transmissible, so he then took that virus and passaged it through multiple ferrets, a procedure that is known to allow viruses to adapt to their host. The result was a virus with just five mutations, which were enough to make it highly transmissible.

Kawaoka instead used reassortment, which occurs in the wild. He took an HA protein from H5N1 and inserted it into a virus made of up genes from the pandemic 2009 H1N1. The flu virus has eight genes. Two code for the surface proteins HA and neuraminidase (NA), and six code for internal proteins. The eight genes are on separate segments, which means that when two different flu viruses infect the same host, they can swap genes and create new viruses in a process known as reassortment. An H1N1 human and H5N1 avian virus, for example, would generate a new virus that has most of the genes from the human virus, making it transmissible in humans, but an avian haemagglutinin and/or neuraminidase. A largely human virus carrying an H5, to which humans have no previous exposure of immunity, could cause a pandemic if it retained the transmissibility of the human virus, and the lethality of H5N1.

Fouchier’s virus was lethal in ferrets, whereas Kawaoka’s was “no more pathogenic than the pandemic 2009 virus”, and killed none of the animals. A reassortant that occurred in the the wild might have different pathogenicities. But two independent groups have now shown that H5N1 can transmit in ferrets, and so such human-transmissible viruses could potentially arise naturally in avian and other animal populations. What controls the exchange of genes between viruses is poorly understood, says Lina, who himself failed in the past to create highly transmissible reassortants of H5N1 and seasonal H1N1. Triple-reassortant viruses that have this TRIG cassette, of six highly conserved internal genes, seem capable of capturing various HA and NA genes from multiple species, he says. “The pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus has a flexibility of function which makes it capable of associating at the molecular level with virus and gene segments from pig, bird and humans.”

The 2009 pandemic H1N1 is circulating in humans in countries such as Indonesia, China and Egypt, where H5N1 cases in human continue to occur. Co-infection of a person with both viruses would give them opportunities to reassort. Pandemic H1N1 also infects pigs, from which it originally emerged, which could provide further opportunities for reassortment. This emphasizes the need for better surveillance to detect human cases of H5N1 infection.

Monitoring of human cases could also help to prevent flu viruses acquiring human transmissibility. There has been some evidence of limited human-to-human transmission of H5N1 in clusters of human cases, and a virus that passes along even a small chain of human hosts has opportunities to adapt to its host, just as H5N1 did in Fouchier’s ferrets.

But as a news article in this week’s edition of Nature shows (see ‘Caution urged for mutant flu work‘), surveillance of H5N1 in birds worldwide is patchy, particularly in poorer countries, where the virus is prevalent. It is also largely geared towards simply detecting and monitoring outbreaks, and few of the viral samples collected are ever sequenced, with just 160 H5N1 isolates submitted to the GenBank database last year. Moreover, if H5N1 surveillance in birds is poor, the situation is far worse in pigs, where there is virtually no systematic surveillance, even in richer countries. H5N1 infections in pigs are uncommon and cause only mild illness, creating little economic incentive to monitor them — GenBank contains partial sequences from just 24 pig H5N1 isolates in total.
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#8
Just to be clear, I am not desiring in anyway a chastisement.  The faithful who end up keeping the Faith often suffer significantly worse than the reprobate (that is, in this life.)

The reason I would pray for a lessened chastisement is because, reasonably speaking, there is no way we are going to get out of this with a little shock and awe.  Take a look around: most of the Western world is depraved and in a state of formlessness or even nihilism.  Did the world of the late 19th to early 20th Centuries deserve the World Wars, but we today expect to get off scot free?

This is just a thought that I had being that I am sort of 'out of commission' due to only a cold with flu-like pains.  Then I was imagining ebola escaping from any of these stupid bioweapons labs all over the place.  Would it really be like the movie Outbreak?  Could the military really contain it?  Or, would it be more like 28 Days Later?

We might wonder why we have the proliforation of health scare/zombie movies.  Personally I think it is more to serve a macabre movie-going market, but could it be a warning fo sorts?

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#9
I heard this some years ago and it is poetic. The Chastisement will come when in a hidden Monastery a Monk who has never lost the Faith says the Pater Noster realizing the words Thy kingdom come Thy will be done begins it.

If the three days of darkness prophecy is accurate the good and the wicked caught outside will both be chastised. I trust what Our Lady said the Consecration will be done but it will be late. If it would be too late She wouldn't mention it. So it's probably going to be at the very last moment. I think we'll get the part which God has allowed the wicked to plan and execute, maybe war, but His part will not come.

What a lot of us forget is it isn't just the Pope and the Bishops Consecrating Russia it's us praying those rosaries every day.  I'd bet the Fisheaters all come close to everyday, but so many other Catholics do not. Most Sacred Heart of Jesus Have Mercy on us, Immaculate Heart of Mary pray for us, Precious Blood of Jesus save us.

tim
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#10
(01-25-2012, 08:27 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: Barack Obama, the alleged President,

Are you a sede ovaloffician?
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
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