Monastery vocation video
#1
This is a vocation video from the Monastery I was at...I really miss it...

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#2
I wish it could be like the old days where you could just show up to a monastery and become a monk or your folks would ship you off and there you would live.  I'm not saying it's right but I wouldn't complain if that was my lot.
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#3
(01-25-2012, 09:12 PM)Josué Wrote: I wish it could be like the old days where you could just show up to a monastery and become a monk or your folks would ship you off and there you would live.  I'm not saying it's right but I wouldn't complain if that was my lot.
Those were the days. St. Francis comes to mind and Blessed Junipero Serra.
Now a days, they take dna saples, urine sample, background check, credit score and a V2 questionnaire.


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#4
(01-25-2012, 08:38 PM)Petertherock Wrote: This is a vocation video from the Monastery I was at...I really miss it...


Looked them up on google, they really are something else!

I wonder though do they have the divine liturgy or mass? And if so which form of the mass?
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#5
He said they are Maronites. They have their own Liturgy and some Aramic is retained. I love the part of the chaplet of Divine Mercy which is part of their Liturgy; O Holy God, O Holy One,  Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us, and on the whole world. It has the ability to transport me.

Peter why not give us a little background on the Daily Liturgy ???

tim
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#6
Peter,
that was beautiful and holy. I spent some time trying to discern a vocation in my youth. Wish that it had been here.
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#7
(01-25-2012, 09:33 PM)Tapatio Wrote:
(01-25-2012, 09:12 PM)Josué Wrote: I wish it could be like the old days where you could just show up to a monastery and become a monk or your folks would ship you off and there you would live.  I'm not saying it's right but I wouldn't complain if that was my lot.
Those were the days. St. Francis comes to mind and Blessed Junipero Serra.
Now a days, they take dna saples, urine sample, background check, credit score and a V2 questionnaire.

The large and glorious Benedictine abbeys were filled with children and young men that were living such an angelic life n a monastic way.  "If you were healthy you had a vocation" is was Mr. Angelica said about the '40s or '30s in the untied states when she joined the poor claras
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#8
Great video!!!!!! :) :) :)
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#9
In Chicago the Servites built many parishes. Their Basilica of Our Lady of Sorrows is magnificent. All of my family here and my Italian family friends were baptized in one of their Churches; Church of the Assumption , St. Dominic, St. Phillip Benizi, and St. Phillip Neri.  These were missions to the Italian immigrants and Italian was the parish language. There was much more back then. The Assumption was Northern Italians, the two St. Phillips were mostly Sicilian, and St. Dominics was mixed Italians and Irish.

tim
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#10
I know Fr. Corapi was there before he went to SOLT...they tried to convince him to stay but he didn't. I wonder if he stayed if he still would have been a priest now...I know he's still a priest but with all the stuff he went through...I think he would have been better off.

It was a Maronite Divine Liturgy. The priest...Fr. Michael in this video was my confessor and he along with the Abbot were the only ones on my side as far as wanting me to stay...but unfortunately, Fr. Michael didn't get to have input since he was my confessor And Fr. Abbot didn't want to overrule the counsel.

The Divine Liturgy had a fair amount of Aramaic. The Consecration is chanted in Aramaic...The greatest emphasis placed on the Maronite Divine Liturgy is the maintenance of Aramaic (Syriac). This was the language that Jesus used and is retained and repeated in the Narrative of the Eucharistic Institution. It is also heard in the entrance prayer the priest recites and in the triple invitation to the greatness of God known as Trisagion (Qadishat) which is chanted in Syriac. It is sung three times by all present:



Qadishat aloho; qadishat hayeltono; qadishat lomoyouto. itraHam ‘alain

Holy are you, O God; Holy are you, O Strong One;

Holy are you, O Immortal One. Have mercy on us.

Here is a good web site that has information about the Maronite Divine Liturgy...
http://www.olol.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=90&Itemid=106&lang=en

I really like the last blessing...the farewell to the Altar at the end of the Divine Liturgy...

Remain in peace, O Altar of God.
May the offering that I have taken from you
be for the remission of my debts
and the pardon of my sins
and may it obtain for me
that I may stand before the tribunal of Christ
without condemnation
and without confusion.
I do not know if I will have the opportunity
to return and offer another sacrifice upon you.
Protect me, O Lord,
and preserve your holy Church
as the way to truth and salvation.
Amen.
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