Monastery vocation video
#11
(01-26-2012, 02:31 AM)Petertherock Wrote: I know Fr. Corapi was there before he went to SOLT...they tried to convince him to stay but he didn't. I wonder if he stayed if he still would have been a priest now...I know he's still a priest but with all the stuff he went through...I think he would have been better off.

It was a Maronite Divine Liturgy. The priest...Fr. Michael in this video was my confessor and he along with the Abbot were the only ones on my side as far as wanting me to stay...but unfortunately, Fr. Michael didn't get to have input since he was my confessor And Fr. Abbot didn't want to overrule the counsel.

The Divine Liturgy had a fair amount of Aramaic. The Consecration is chanted in Aramaic...The greatest emphasis placed on the Maronite Divine Liturgy is the maintenance of Aramaic (Syriac). This was the language that Jesus used and is retained and repeated in the Narrative of the Eucharistic Institution. It is also heard in the entrance prayer the priest recites and in the triple invitation to the greatness of God known as Trisagion (Qadishat) which is chanted in Syriac. It is sung three times by all present:



Qadishat aloho; qadishat hayeltono; qadishat lomoyouto. itraHam ‘alain

Holy are you, O God; Holy are you, O Strong One;

Holy are you, O Immortal One. Have mercy on us.

Here is a good web site that has information about the Maronite Divine Liturgy...
http://www.olol.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=90&Itemid=106&lang=en

I really like the last blessing...the farewell to the Altar at the end of the Divine Liturgy...

Remain in peace, O Altar of God.
May the offering that I have taken from you
be for the remission of my debts
and the pardon of my sins
and may it obtain for me
that I may stand before the tribunal of Christ
without condemnation
and without confusion.
I do not know if I will have the opportunity
to return and offer another sacrifice upon you.
Protect me, O Lord,
and preserve your holy Church
as the way to truth and salvation.
Amen.

I can see why you miss it, I 'miss it' and I haven't even been there  :(
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#12
One of my nephew's high school pal is Maronite from Syria and Lebanon. He's nearing thirty, but I wish the young had qualities like this guy. He never addresses me with out calling me Uncle Tim. He's a prison guard at the Bridewell, which is notorious for a==hole criminals here in Chicago, similar to Rikers in NYC. He has this Levantine inbred notion that elders must be respected. That is way lost here in America.

The first time I heard the Trisagion as it is in the Divine Mercy Chaplet it shook me to my core. It was as if I was transported. I then did a little research on it, and discovered the East has it in their Liturgy, even Greek. I spoke to him about it. He remarked how those words have Power. We digressed into the TLM and the Divine Liturgy, but his understanding about Power has stuck with me.

In the TLM, the Sanctus, and the Suscipiat, and the Domine non sum dignus also have that Power for me. In the Divine Office the Invitiatory ad Matutinum especially; "Hodie, si vocem eius audieritis, nolite obdurare corda vestra, sicut in exacerbatione secundum diem tentationis in deserto" ubi tentaverunt me patres vestri, probaverunt et viderunt opera mea." These words directly attributed to God Almighty make me fear, it's a warning to all of us, yet in the NO only the first part is promoted with out the warning of hardening our hearts will lead to our destruction.

Here's another from the NO. In the Mass before the Domine non sum dignus, there is this "Ecce Agnus Dei, Ecce qui tollit peccata mundi, Beati qui ad cenam Agni vocati sunt". The strange part for me is these words when pronounced in Latin have Power, but in English not so much. I really don't understand how this works, but certain words are a conductor for God's Power. It also appears for me that certain Languages are better conductors than other like copper over gold.

end of spiel, sorry for derail, carry on, old chaps,

tim
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#13
(01-26-2012, 11:33 AM)Tim Wrote: One of my nephew's high school pal is Maronite from Syria and Lebanon. He's nearing thirty, but I wish the young had qualities like this guy. He never addresses me with out calling me Uncle Tim. He's a prison guard at the Bridewell, which is notorious for a==hole criminals here in Chicago, similar to Rikers in NYC. He has this Levantine inbred notion that elders must be respected. That is way lost here in America.

The first time I heard the Trisagion as it is in the Divine Mercy Chaplet it shook me to my core. It was as if I was transported. I then did a little research on it, and discovered the East has it in their Liturgy, even Greek. I spoke to him about it. He remarked how those words have Power. We digressed into the TLM and the Divine Liturgy, but his understanding about Power has stuck with me.

In the TLM, the Sanctus, and the Suscipiat, and the Domine non sum dignus also have that Power for me. In the Divine Office the Invitiatory ad Matutinum especially; "Hodie, si vocem eius audieritis, nolite obdurare corda vestra, sicut in exacerbatione secundum diem tentationis in deserto" ubi tentaverunt me patres vestri, probaverunt et viderunt opera mea." These words directly attributed to God Almighty make me fear, it's a warning to all of us, yet in the NO only the first part is promoted with out the warning of hardening our hearts will lead to our destruction.

Here's another from the NO. In the Mass before the Domine non sum dignus, there is this "Ecce Agnus Dei, Ecce qui tollit peccata mundi, Beati qui ad cenam Agni vocati sunt". The strange part for me is these words when pronounced in Latin have Power, but in English not so much. I really don't understand how this works, but certain words are a conductor for God's Power. It also appears for me that certain Languages are better conductors than other like copper over gold.

end of spiel, sorry for derail, carry on, old chaps,

tim

I completely agree with you about the 'Ecce Agnus Dei..' those words always and I mean ALWAYS stick in my head, in english not so much but in latin they just have a certain power for some reason, The Domini non sum dignus not so much, at least outside of mass but the Ecce Agnus dei is just something else
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#14
Trent, the second part which is in the NO Mass but rarely heard in Latin, and only once in a while on EWTN have that power as well ...Beati qui ad cenam Agni vocati sunt. They come from the Apocalypse 19:9 here;et dicit mihi scribe beati qui ad cenam nuptiarum agni vocati sunt et dicit mihi haec verba vera Dei sunt. These words are told to John and are God's own and True as the Scripture says. What is a little curious is they refer to the Nuptial Feast in Heaven of the Lamb and His bride the Church, hence the ommission of nuptiarum in the Mass.

my riffing comes from growing up on the blues

tim
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#15
(01-26-2012, 12:46 PM)Tim Wrote: Trent, the second part which is in the NO Mass but rarely heard in Latin, and only once in a while on EWTN have that power as well ...Beati qui ad cenam Agni vocati sunt. They come from the Apocalypse 19:9 here;et dicit mihi scribe beati qui ad cenam nuptiarum agni vocati sunt et dicit mihi haec verba vera Dei sunt. These words are told to John and are God's own and True as the Scripture says. What is a little curious is they refer to the Nuptial Feast in Heaven of the Lamb and His bride the Church, hence the ommission of nuptiarum in the Mass.

my riffing comes from growing up on the blues

tim

Haha, I will definitely have to pay more attention to the mass next time I attend it.

I have to say I really admire the eastern liturgies.
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