"Eucharist" as an un-articled proper noun
#11
When one does not know people's reason for doing something, it is not right to make up bad motives for them.  It is neither just nor charitable.
Reply
#12
(01-29-2012, 05:23 PM)JayneK Wrote: When one does not know people's reason for doing something, it is not right to make up bad motives for them.  It is neither just nor charitable.
can there be a good motive?
Reply
#13
(01-29-2012, 05:35 PM)voxxpopulisuxx Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:23 PM)JayneK Wrote: When one does not know people's reason for doing something, it is not right to make up bad motives for them.  It is neither just nor charitable.
can there be a good motive?
Does there need to be a specific justified good reason for defying your expectations of the use of the English language?

I mean, what is your motive for not capitalising the first letter of that sentence? Can there be a good motive?
Reply
#14
This is a common tactic of the NO. It falls in line with "We are Church" "being Church" "doing Eucharist" "celebrate Eucharist". It's so annoying, and right off you can tell it's going to be a liberal parish. When they drop the article they also often call themselves a "Catholic Community" instead of a parish and use phrases like "faith journey" and "social justice", use so-called inclusive language, and of course, dialogue

.
Reply
#15
(01-29-2012, 05:35 PM)voxxpopulisuxx Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:23 PM)JayneK Wrote: When one does not know people's reason for doing something, it is not right to make up bad motives for them.  It is neither just nor charitable.
can there be a good motive?

Usually people have good intentions.  They may be mistaken in what is good.  They may choose a lesser good rather than a greater good.  But people tend to seek what is good.

Assuming bad motives with no real evidence that there are any is just a way to depersonalize or demonize people.  It is part of seeing the world as "us" versus "them".  We want to imagine that "our side" is good and the other is bad.  It isn't that simple.  
Reply
#16
(01-29-2012, 05:40 PM)su Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:35 PM)voxxpopulisuxx Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:23 PM)JayneK Wrote: When one does not know people's reason for doing something, it is not right to make up bad motives for them.  It is neither just nor charitable.
can there be a good motive?
Does there need to be a specific justified good reason for defying your expectations of the use of the English language?

I mean, what is your motive for not capitalising the first letter of that sentence? Can there be a good motive?
No there is no good motive except laziness on my part , and there would be nothing unjust about pointing it out...as you ..um...did.
If a parish uses the following language. We are "gender inclusive", or when referring to females they write womyn...well sorry but if it walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck etc etc...
Reply
#17
(01-29-2012, 05:42 PM)Spooky Wrote: This is a common tactic of the NO. It falls in line with "We are Church" "being Church" "doing Eucharist" "celebrate Eucharist". It's so annoying, and right off you can tell it's going to be a liberal parish. When they drop the article they also often call themselves a "Catholic Community" instead of a parish and use phrases like "faith journey" and "social justice", use so-called inclusive language, and of course, dialogue

Any group has its own jargon, but that does not mean the ideas are wrong.  Some of those you list are bad idea and others are harmless.  Grouping them all together because they are jargon is not a meaningful category.
Reply
#18
(01-29-2012, 05:47 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:35 PM)voxxpopulisuxx Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:23 PM)JayneK Wrote: When one does not know people's reason for doing something, it is not right to make up bad motives for them.  It is neither just nor charitable.
can there be a good motive?

Usually people have good intentions.  They may be mistaken in what is good.  They may choose a lesser good rather than a greater good.  But people tend to seek what is good.

Assuming bad motives with no real evidence that there are any is just a way to depersonalize or demonize people.  It is part of seeing the world as "us" versus "them".  We want to imagine that "our side" is good and the other is bad.  It isn't that simple.  
you make a good point. But we are battle weary, and you are ascribing uncharitable motives to our actions are you not??
Reply
#19
(01-29-2012, 05:05 PM)Master_P Wrote: It's because they don't want to say the word "Mass".

Example: "Will you be at 9 o' clock Eucharist tomorrow?"   

Exactly. In the end, it's just as simple as that.

Only a completely misguided or ignorant person would venture to ascribe "good intentions" to those people behind the revolutionary programme called "Novus Ordo." Things like these have been happening for decades, eroding the faith of Catholics worldwide step by step.
Reply
#20
(01-29-2012, 05:52 PM)voxxpopulisuxx Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:47 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:35 PM)voxxpopulisuxx Wrote:
(01-29-2012, 05:23 PM)JayneK Wrote: When one does not know people's reason for doing something, it is not right to make up bad motives for them.  It is neither just nor charitable.
can there be a good motive?

Usually people have good intentions.  They may be mistaken in what is good.  They may choose a lesser good rather than a greater good.  But people tend to seek what is good.

Assuming bad motives with no real evidence that there are any is just a way to depersonalize or demonize people.  It is part of seeing the world as "us" versus "them".  We want to imagine that "our side" is good and the other is bad.  It isn't that simple.  
you make a good point. But we are battle weary, and you are ascribing uncharitable motives to our actions are you not??

You are right.  I should not have put it the way I did.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)