Classical Greece & Rome
#1
I was listening to one of Fr. Sheen's talks the other day; and he spoke at length about how one can find in Classical authors either a general yearning for the perfect man - or a fairly specific prophecy that he will come among us. 

Virgil, for example, in ECLOGUE IV:

Quote: Now the Virgin returns, and Saturn's reign returns;
Now a new generation is sent down from high heaven.
Only, chaste Lucina, favour the child at his birth,
By whom, first of all, the iron age will end,
And a golden race arise in all the world.....

And it goes on, "great Achilles will again be sent to Troy."  Etc. 

So I'm wondering whether there's been a study of this sort of prophecy - or intense yearing that one can find in the Greek tragic playwrights for example - among the Classical Greeks & Romans. 

Anyone know of a good source? 

Cheers all!

~Cawbs



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#2
Saint Augustine wrote about it a bit in the City of God.  He practically canonized Plato. 
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#3
It won't hurt to read Edith Hamilton's Mythology book. I don't think there were any references to what you were talking about, but it's a great start and gives you a background about this.  Also, look into St. Paul and his missionary efforts in Greece.  There might be something there.  Remember, the Greeks had a statue to the unknown god, and St. Paul referred to that and told the Greeks the "unknown god" was Christ Who has come.  Very interesting time period that, the contact of the Greek tradition with Judeo rooted Christianity, and the perfect man for the job, the Greek educated Jewish by birth Paul.
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#4
(02-02-2012, 02:47 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: Saint Augustine wrote about it a bit in the City of God.  He practically canonized Plato. 

Yes, Fr. Sheen mentioned Plato as well.  And of course St. Aquinas saw much in Aristotle that pointed towards Christianity. 

I'd be surprised if someone hasn't done a manuscript length study on this. 
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#5
(02-02-2012, 02:48 PM)drummerboy Wrote: Remember, the Greeks had a statue to the unknown god, and St. Paul referred to that and told the Greeks the "unknown god" was Christ Who has come.  Very interesting time period that, the contact of the Greek tradition with Judeo rooted Christianity, and the perfect man for the job, the Greek educated Jewish by birth Paul.

Yes indeed!  Smile   

ΑΓΝΩΣΤΟΣ ΘΕΟΣ

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#6
(02-02-2012, 03:19 PM)Micawber Wrote:
(02-02-2012, 02:47 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: Saint Augustine wrote about it a bit in the City of God.  He practically canonized Plato. 

Yes, Fr. Sheen mentioned Plato as well.  And of course St. Aquinas saw much in Aristotle that pointed towards Christianity. 

I'd be surprised if someone hasn't done a manuscript length study on this. 

Plato was much more focused  than Aristotle on the idea of the just man and how society would hate that man.  In the Republic Plato wrote: "the just man will have to be scourged, racked, fettered, blinded, and finally, after the most extreme suffering, he will be crucified."  
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#7
(02-02-2012, 03:25 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(02-02-2012, 03:19 PM)Micawber Wrote:
(02-02-2012, 02:47 PM)Someone1776 Wrote: Saint Augustine wrote about it a bit in the City of God.  He practically canonized Plato. 

Yes, Fr. Sheen mentioned Plato as well.  And of course St. Aquinas saw much in Aristotle that pointed towards Christianity. 

I'd be surprised if someone hasn't done a manuscript length study on this. 

Plato was much more focused  than Aristotle on the idea of the just man and how society would hate that man.  In the Republic Plato wrote: "the just man will have to be scourged, racked, fettered, blinded, and finally, after the most extreme suffering, he will be crucified."  

When I heard Sheen say that I got chills up my spine; that's why I'm trying to find a resource/study that pulls all those things together.
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#8
(02-02-2012, 02:40 PM)Micawber Wrote: So I'm wondering whether there's been a study of this sort of prophecy - or intense yearing that one can find in the Greek tragic playwrights for example - among the Classical Greeks & Romans.  Anyone know of a good source? 

For the popular ones, get a book explaining the fresoces in the Sistine chapel.  One side of the ceiling are pagan anticipations of Christ.
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#9
The Mazzaroth, the  constellations, written about in Job, some thnk tell God's promise of the coming Messiah from the get go.

http://philologos.org/__eb-mazzaroth/

tim
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#10
(02-02-2012, 03:23 PM)Micawber Wrote:
(02-02-2012, 02:48 PM)drummerboy Wrote: Remember, the Greeks had a statue to the unknown god, and St. Paul referred to that and told the Greeks the "unknown god" was Christ Who has come.  Very interesting time period that, the contact of the Greek tradition with Judeo rooted Christianity, and the perfect man for the job, the Greek educated Jewish by birth Paul.

Yes indeed!   Smile     

ΑΓΝΩΣΤΟΣ ΘΕΟΣ

Dang it!  I wish I knew Greek!
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