Pre-Vatican II "Sunday only Catholics"
#11
(02-03-2012, 11:42 PM)Tim Wrote: To expand a little more from M O'neil. in the big city we didn't have very much disposable income. Food, rent, tuition, and the Sunday $2.oo in the basket was just about all of it. That means no one had books laying around, no Lives of the Saints, or Denzingers,  Amazon wasn't delivering yet.
Sunday was Mass, and the big meal in the ethnic parts of the big city. We called it Pranzo. Many relatives and folks we called uncle and aunt came. Six kids going to Catholic School was a big deal, so everyone asked questions about the Sisters, how we were doing, and the American priests. If you are judging by knowledge as in education, we were barely Catholic. If you are measuring by objective fruits were Catholics.

My Aunt Marie had a very good job, because she had gone to a Commercial High School. She was the Comptroller for Hilton Hotels, and Sunday after Mass she rested and stayed home. When she came she always brought little gifts for our birthdays, communion, or confirmation, etc. Oh and a $1.oo for all of us kids, ten kids with my cousins upstairs. She was a big deal because she worked for and was friends with the Hiltons. She knew lots of important people, and she'd have them bring back medals from Italy when they returned. Me and my cousins that lived upstairs thought she was very very rich. She wasn't.

One of my grandmother's prized possession was a statue of the Infant of Prague, she kep ti in the tiny bedroom in the back where she slept. My ma had a 3' tall statue of the BMV, which my little brother knocked over accidently and chipped up pretty good. She tried to paint it up so you couldn't see, but eventuall she realized every one saw it, and she put the BMV in the closet. When the changes came everyone talked about the old neighborhood and the Parish Church where I was baptized and they grew up and lived for many years. Fr. Tom our pastor there would not cave to Cardinal Cody. All of the Italians that came from there did what ever they could to support him, either with work or money, no mtter what Parish they now lived in.

We were not saints, and we had friends and relatives that had stopped going to Mass long before Vatican II, but the changes shook the foundation of the community. Fr. Tom our priest and friend was attacked by the Cardinal. The Mass eternal from all time changed.  People quit. Priests quit. The Sisters quit. No one knew from week to week, what new innovation would be sprung on us at Mass. Many felt betrayed. No one knew which end was up.

It was a cultural upheaval. We were in diaspora. Where we all had moved people couldn't speak Italian, the Church was what we called American. No more Latin, no Anichini the butcher, no more Brodi and Nassi the pharmacists, no more Fathers, Tomas, or Gaitano, now it was James or Brian. At first no more Italians, and later no more Catholics.

For us it was from every direction. There was nothing left to hang on to anymore.

tim

Very very powerful post. You should write a book!  Grin
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#12
Traditionalist Tom, sometimes I can't believe I wrote it. Either my guardian angel or the Holy Ghost is helping. I don't mean I'm inspired or that this comes from God, but I'm getting help. I know it's mine because of the typos, and it's my voice, there.

tim
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#13
(02-04-2012, 12:03 AM)Warrenton Wrote:
(02-03-2012, 11:42 PM)Tim Wrote: For us it was from every direction. There was nothing left to hang on to anymore. tim

Je me souviens.

Ricordiamo !

tim
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#14
(02-04-2012, 03:29 AM)Tim Wrote:
(02-04-2012, 12:03 AM)Warrenton Wrote:
(02-03-2012, 11:42 PM)Tim Wrote: For us it was from every direction. There was nothing left to hang on to anymore. tim

Je me souviens.

Ricordiamo !

tim

That really was a tremendous post.  I agree -  it could be the basis for a book. 
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#15
I loved Tim's phrase - "parish ghetto".

I grew up with no religion, and I can only imagine growing up with friends and family in an area where God came first.
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#16
(02-04-2012, 07:56 PM)SaintAndrew Wrote: I loved Tim's phrase - "parish ghetto".

They still exist some places! Several years ago, in KCK, I met an elderly woman who told me she lived in St Peter's Parish but made a point of telling me she was really from St John the Evangelist's Parish, about 8 or 9 blocks away!
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