The Eastern Churches and St. Thomas Aquinas
Modern communication technology has radically increased Vatican micro-managing of such things, which while not wrong in and of itself, might well be imprudent or appropriate in ordinary matters.
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(02-12-2012, 09:06 PM)Silouan Wrote:
(02-12-2012, 08:22 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: Why should the Pope intervene in selection of bishops if there is no problem?


What can the Pope handle that a local synod could not?

Any number of matters reserved to the holy see, certain excommunications and censures (very serious matters), the Pauline and petrine privileges, apostolic indults, certain indulgences, the authoritative interpretation of Canon law and the deposition of bishops amongst other matters.

This is a result of the pope being the supreme law maker and law giver in the Church, the power of the keys and the fact that the jurisdiction of bishops both flows from and is subject to the popes.
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(02-13-2012, 06:28 AM)TrentCath Wrote: Any number of matters reserved to the holy see, certain excommunications and censures (very serious matters), the Pauline and petrine privileges, apostolic indults, certain indulgences, the authoritative interpretation of Canon law and the deposition of bishops amongst other matters.

. . . such as, for example, dogmatic definitions as well as the final word on any given doctrinal matter upon which the bishops of the Church are divided.

Indeed, the office of the papacy truly secures the "principle of unity."
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(02-13-2012, 06:36 AM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(02-13-2012, 06:28 AM)TrentCath Wrote: Any number of matters reserved to the holy see, certain excommunications and censures (very serious matters), the Pauline and petrine privileges, apostolic indults, certain indulgences, the authoritative interpretation of Canon law and the deposition of bishops amongst other matters.

. . . such as, for example, dogmatic definitions as well as the final word on any given doctrinal matter upon which the bishops of the Church are divided.

Indeed, the office of the papacy truly secures the "principle of unity."

Indeed, I was taking that as a given.
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(02-13-2012, 06:39 AM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-13-2012, 06:36 AM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(02-13-2012, 06:28 AM)TrentCath Wrote: Any number of matters reserved to the holy see, certain excommunications and censures (very serious matters), the Pauline and petrine privileges, apostolic indults, certain indulgences, the authoritative interpretation of Canon law and the deposition of bishops amongst other matters.

. . . such as, for example, dogmatic definitions as well as the final word on any given doctrinal matter upon which the bishops of the Church are divided.

Indeed, the office of the papacy truly secures the "principle of unity."

Indeed, I was taking that as a given.

I don't think it is with our Eastern brothers, I'm afraid.
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(02-13-2012, 01:54 PM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(02-13-2012, 06:39 AM)TrentCath Wrote:
(02-13-2012, 06:36 AM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(02-13-2012, 06:28 AM)TrentCath Wrote: Any number of matters reserved to the holy see, certain excommunications and censures (very serious matters), the Pauline and petrine privileges, apostolic indults, certain indulgences, the authoritative interpretation of Canon law and the deposition of bishops amongst other matters.

. . . such as, for example, dogmatic definitions as well as the final word on any given doctrinal matter upon which the bishops of the Church are divided.

Indeed, the office of the papacy truly secures the "principle of unity."

Indeed, I was taking that as a given.

I don't think it is with our Eastern brothers, I'm afraid.

True enough.

I forgot, at least under the old code a private vow of virginity made by someone after the age of 18 can also only be dispensed by the holy see.
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