One Weird-Looking Church
#31
(02-09-2012, 05:43 PM)Old Salt Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:40 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:31 PM)Old Salt Wrote: Is kind of a "faux eeriness" but still evil looking.

A lot of people say the same thing about Gothic architecture in general.  :shrug:
One cannot accurately compare the solid awe-inspiring holy beauty of a Chartres with the candle cathedral in Spain.
Chartres does not scare me.
Sacred Family does.

Chartes does scare a lot of people.  I distinctly remember being creeped out by Mission San Jose as a Protestant child.  Emotional reactions are not necessarily accurate spiritual markers.

[Image: c9577.jpg]
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#32
^ Is this La Misión de San José in Fremont, CA?
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#33
(02-09-2012, 05:50 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: ^ Is this La Misión de San José in Fremont, CA?

The same.  I'm from the East Bay, myself.  I suspect you might know the parish I attend.

Back to the main topic, check out this straight on picture of the nave roof in Barcelona.

[Image: 550px-Sagrada_Familia_nave_roof_detail.jpg]
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#34
(02-09-2012, 05:47 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:43 PM)Old Salt Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:40 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:31 PM)Old Salt Wrote: Is kind of a "faux eeriness" but still evil looking.

A lot of people say the same thing about Gothic architecture in general.  :shrug:
One cannot accurately compare the solid awe-inspiring holy beauty of a Chartres with the candle cathedral in Spain.
Chartres does not scare me.
Sacred Family does.

Chartes does scare a lot of people.  I distinctly remember being creeped out by Mission San Jose as a Protestant child.  Emotional reactions are not necessarily accurate spiritual markers.

[Image: c9577.jpg]
Agreed.
This is a matter of emotions.
May I please ask how this pretty mission church scared you?
My first reaction was "what a pretty church".
As a child I would have loved a place like this.
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#35
(02-09-2012, 05:53 PM)Old Salt Wrote: Agreed.
This is a matter of emotions.
May I please ask how this pretty mission church scared you?
My first reaction was "what a pretty church".
As a child I would have loved a place like this.

Well, I was raised a Protestant, so the Spanish statuary was rather startling and uncomfortable when we went there for a field trip.  It is a pretty church, but my visceral reaction as a child was negative.
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#36
(02-09-2012, 05:52 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:50 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: ^ Is this La Misión de San José in Fremont, CA?

The same.  I'm from the East Bay, myself.  I suspect you might know the parish I attend.

Back to the main topic, check out this straight on picture of the nave roof in Barcelona.

[Image: 550px-Sagrada_Familia_nave_roof_detail.jpg]
Now my first reaction to that was "Hell".
Scared the bleep out of me.
I once saw a Dali painting of the netherworld that reminds me of that horrendous view.
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#37
(02-09-2012, 05:59 PM)Old Salt Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:52 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:50 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: ^ Is this La Misión de San José in Fremont, CA?

The same.  I'm from the East Bay, myself.  I suspect you might know the parish I attend.

Back to the main topic, check out this straight on picture of the nave roof in Barcelona.

[Image: 550px-Sagrada_Familia_nave_roof_detail.jpg]
Now my first reaction to that was "Hell".
Scared the bleep out of me.
I once saw a Dali painting of the netherworld that reminds me of that horrendous view.

Looks more like Heaven to me.  The intricate order of the celestial hierarchy.  The vibrant colors, the complex mathematical symmetry of the shapes.  Pure beauty.
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#38
(02-09-2012, 06:02 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:59 PM)Old Salt Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:52 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:50 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: ^ Is this La Misión de San José in Fremont, CA?

The same.  I'm from the East Bay, myself.  I suspect you might know the parish I attend.

Back to the main topic, check out this straight on picture of the nave roof in Barcelona.

[Image: 550px-Sagrada_Familia_nave_roof_detail.jpg]
Now my first reaction to that was "Hell".
Scared the bleep out of me.
I once saw a Dali painting of the netherworld that reminds me of that horrendous view.

Looks more like Heaven to me.  The intricate order of the celestial hierarchy.  The vibrant colors, the complex mathematical symmetry of the shapes.  Pure beauty.

The one thing that bothers me is how the pillars look like tendons from inside a body. Otherwise it's stunning.
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#39
I think Gaudi was onto something very interesting but wasn't entirely successful at it. His ideas could have paved the way for an alternate modern style that wasn't so "modernist" as what we're stuck with today.

As beautiful as Gothic arches are, they are imperfect structurally...they tend to be weak both near the point of the arch, and toward the bottom where the curve meets the top of the columns.  Obviously architects through the centuries have found ways to compensate for this, but Gaudi wanted to use perfect arches.  He designed Sagrada Familia using inverted catenary arches (kind of like the big St. Lois, MO arch) since they perfectly distribute the downward force of their own weight through the exact shape of their own curve. So he was drawing on traditional church architecture, but infusing it with modern knowledge of physics and mathematics to try to perfect it.  But he didn't stop at the arches; he conceived of a whole aesthetic using organic, hyperbolic, and other forms of non-euclidian geometry for decoration.

Now part of the reason I think Gothic looks so wonderful is that all of the proportions of a Gothic cathedral are derived from the same triangle or square...every part is proportional to every other part. There is a clear heirarchy of proportion and repeated shapes that create a very orderly and pleasing visual experience.  In contrast, I think Gaudi was trying to do too much all at the same time. He was paying homage to the Gothic style by creating all of those fantastic columns and decorating them and the bays in between with fantastic geometric shapes, but people are not used to looking at non-euclidian shapes, and there are so many all mashed together that they lose their coherence.  Similarly, I think the melty looking parts on the outside were supposed to be a tribute to Spanish Baroque in weird way, but combined with all the crazy shapes it is overall too much.

Maybe if Gaudi's concepts had caught on and we had multiple architects building similar churches for the past century, but working toward using the same sort of geometry in a more orderly, proportional manner, the style may have been perfected by now.  Classical architectural styles are based on proportions found in nature that are very pleasing to the human eye.  It's refreshing that a modern architect was trying to design using mathematics inspired by nature (even if he didn't hit on the exact right combinations and proportions to make something universally beautiful), instead of designing with an agenda that denies the objective beauty of the natural world.
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#40
(02-09-2012, 06:08 PM)Graham Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 06:02 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:59 PM)Old Salt Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:52 PM)Parmandur Wrote:
(02-09-2012, 05:50 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: ^ Is this La Misión de San José in Fremont, CA?

The same.  I'm from the East Bay, myself.  I suspect you might know the parish I attend.

Back to the main topic, check out this straight on picture of the nave roof in Barcelona.

[Image: 550px-Sagrada_Familia_nave_roof_detail.jpg]
Now my first reaction to that was "Hell".
Scared the bleep out of me.
I once saw a Dali painting of the netherworld that reminds me of that horrendous view.

Looks more like Heaven to me.  The intricate order of the celestial hierarchy.  The vibrant colors, the complex mathematical symmetry of the shapes.  Pure beauty.

The one thing that bothers me is how the pillars look like tendons from inside a body. Otherwise it's stunning.

Well, Gothic architecture as a rule has an organic feel to it, so I don't think that distracts from it.  Gaudy colors are the traditional rule of the day.
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