From Aggiornamento to Recovery
#1
Irish writer Desmond Fennell has put up an essay on his site that he wrote for The Furrow (liberal Irish Catholic review) in October, 2010:

http://www.desmondfennell.com/essay-from...covery.htm

Some interesting insights about the problems inaugurated by Vatican II, especially coming from someone who initially welcomed the Council enthusiastically.

He kindly allowed me to post on my blog an article he wrote just before the Council (May, 1962) for Doctrine and Life asking 'Will the Irish Stay Christian?'

http://lxoa.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/wil...christian/

At the time the then editor of Doctrine and Life, Austin Flannery, O.P., considered the question so self-evidently ridiculous that he retitled it 'Ireland and Christianity'.
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#2
Where I'm at in County Cook on the other side of the Atlantic I see some of what he says. We, until the monetary crisis had lots of Irish working here. In the part of Chicago around me, in the many many pubs, Gaelic could be heard any day of the week. What I saw was a bit frightening.  My Irish friends were more American in action than we Americans. They, those here I know, were full bore participants in the sexual revolution. This contrasts bleakly with the Irish emigres I knew as a kid, before Ireland became rich. Irish and chaste were synonymous. They also had succumbed to American style greed, and that is exactly the consumerism the writer spoke of in the piece. When the crisis hit they jumped on Aer Lingus and headed home, knowing there wold be no support for them here. Many were here illegally.

I hope I live long enough to see a recovery and their return. Many of these guys I became friends with and frankly I miss some of them. There is one bit of hope here. When a friend of theirs was dieing here in the hospital they were pretty shook, especially as he was alone here and they were too. They had a priest that would visit him, and he was prepared in that respect. They were not. I told 'em I'd get him a scapular and rosary and give 'em to a pal to take to the hospital. What I didn't tell them is I'd get one for each of them.The nexttime I saw them in the pub, and they were coming from a visit to their friend, I gave them to them. I made them put them on explaining everything and telling them to pray the rosary.  They were sheepish like I was their father telling them to straighten out. That was a bout two months before they went home.

tim   
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#3
(02-15-2012, 12:06 PM)Tim Wrote: Where I'm at in County Cook on the other side of the Atlantic I see some of what he says. We, until the monetary crisis had lots of Irish working here. In the part of Chicago around me, in the many many pubs, Gaelic could be heard any day of the week. What I saw was a bit frightening.  My Irish friends were more American in action than we Americans. They, those here I know, were full bore participants in the sexual revolution. This contrasts bleakly with the Irish emigres I knew as a kid, before Ireland became rich. Irish and chaste were synonymous. They also had succumbed to American style greed, and that is exactly the consumerism the writer spoke of in the piece. When the crisis hit they jumped on Aer Lingus and headed home, knowing there wold be no support for them here. Many were here illegally.

I hope I live long enough to see a recovery and their return. Many of these guys I became friends with and frankly I miss some of them. There is one bit of hope here. When a friend of theirs was dieing here in the hospital they were pretty shook, especially as he was alone here and they were too. They had a priest that would visit him, and he was prepared in that respect. They were not. I told 'em I'd get him a scapular and rosary and give 'em to a pal to take to the hospital. What I didn't tell them is I'd get one for each of them.The nexttime I saw them in the pub, and they were coming from a visit to their friend, I gave them to them. I made them put them on explaining everything and telling them to pray the rosary.  They were sheepish like I was their father telling them to straighten out. That was a bout two months before they went home.

tim   

I would have loved to be there, the Irish are something else  :LOL: (and that isn't necessarily a bad or good thing before people ask)
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#4
Malta seems to have embarked enthusiastically in its aggiornamento way back in the sixties ...

[urlhttp://pro-tridentina-malta.blogspot.com/2013/11/aggiornamento-in-malta.html][/url]
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