Lenten Pick Me-up
#31
From the Angelus Missal is the section talking about the US fasting laws that were modified in 1949:

Note: Liquids, including milk and fruit juices, might be taken at any time on a day of fast, but "other works of charity, piety, and prayer for the Pope should be substituted" to compensate for this relaxation.

I don't think the FE site mentions this caveat.
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#32
http://www.saintbenedict.com/monastery/bulletin.html

Fast & Abstinence - What do they mean?

Abstinence – The law of abstinence requires a Catholic 14 years of age until death to abstain from eating meat on Fridays in honor of the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Meat is considered to be the flesh and organs of mammals and fowl. Moral theologians have traditionally considered this also to forbid soups or gravies made from them. Salt and freshwater species of fish, amphibians, reptiles and shellfish are permitted, as are animal derived products such as margarine and gelatin which do not have any meat taste.

Fasting – The law of fasting requires a Catholic from the 18th Birthday [Canon 97] to the 59th Birthday [i.e. the beginning of the 60th year, a year which will be completed on the 60th birthday] to reduce the amount of food eaten from normal. The Church defines this as one meal a day, and two smaller meals which if added together would not exceed the main meal in quantity. Such fasting is obligatory on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. The fast is broken by eating between meals and by drinks which could be considered food (milk shakes, but not milk). Alcoholic beverages do not break the fast; however, they seem contrary to the spirit of doing penance.

Those who are excused from fast or abstinence besides those outside the age limits, those of unsound mind, the sick, the frail, pregnant or nursing women according to need for meat or nourishment, manual laborers according to need, guests at a meal who cannot excuse themselves without giving great offense or causing enmity and other situations of moral or physical impossibility to observe the penitential discipline.
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#33
(02-20-2012, 01:16 PM)knittycat Wrote: "Hey baby, you're lookin' good today.  You on a diet or is it Lent"
Snerk

Nice! Believe it or not, Google did not find any good Catholic ones for me.
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#34
Heh, thanks. There were a couple that popped into my mind that were just too crass to share.  That one made me giggle though.
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