Bishop Athanasius Schneider's Bombshell Address
#1
The French Paix Liturgique has provided a transcript of a talk that Bishop Schneider gave in France back in January. (via rorate caeli).

It is a must read in its entirety, but here is the main message:

"Bishop Athanasius Schneider" Wrote:By this I mean the five liturgical practices I shall mention shortly; they may be termed the five wounds of the liturgical mystical body of Christ. These are wounds, for they amount to a violent break with the past since they deemphasize the sacrificial character (which is actually the central and essential character of the Mass) and put forward the notion of banquet.
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A) The first and most obvious wound is the celebration of the sacrifice of the Mass in which the priest celebrates with his face turned towards the faithful, especially during the Eucharistic prayer and the consecration, the highest and most sacred moment of the worship that is God’s due.
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B) The second wound is communion in the hand, which is now spread nearly throughout the entire world.
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C) The third wound is the new Offertory prayers. They are an entirely new creation and had never been used in the Church. They do less to express the mystery of the sacrifice of the Cross than that of a banquet; thus they recall the prayers of the Jewish Sabbath meal. In the more than thousand-year tradition of the Church in both East and West, the Offertory prayers have always been expressly oriented to the mystery of the sacrifice of the Cross.
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D) The fourth wound is the total disappearance of Latin in the huge majority of Eucharistic celebrations in the Ordinary Form in all Catholic countries.
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E) The fifth wound is the exercise of the liturgical services of lector and acolyte by women as well as the exercise of these same services in lay clothing while entering into the choir during Holy Mass directly from the space reserved to the faithful. This custom has never existed in the Church, or at least has never been welcome. It confers to the celebration of the Catholic Mass the exterior character of informality, the character and style of a rather profane assembly. The second council of Nicaea, already in 787, forbad such practices when it lay down the following canon: “If someone is not ordained, it is not permitted for him to do the reading from the ambo during the holy liturgy“ (can. 14). This norm has been constantly followed in the Church.
[...]

For this reason we need new saints today, one or several Saint Catherines of Sienna. We need the “vox populi fidelis” demanding the suppression of this liturgical rupture. The tragedy in all of this is that, today as back in the time of the Avignon exile, a great majority of the clergy, especially in its higher ranks, is content with this rupture.

Before we can expect efficacious and lasting fruits from the new evangelization, a process of conversion must get under way within the Church. How can we call others to convert while, among those doing the calling, no convincing conversion towards God has yet occurred, internally or externally? The sacrifice of the Mass, the sacrifice of adoration of Christ, the greatest mystery of the Faith, the most sublime act of adoration is celebrated in a closed circle where people are looking at each other.

What is missing is “conversio ad Dominum.” It is necessary, even externally and physically. Since in the liturgy Christ is treated as though he were not God, and he is not given clear exterior signs of the adoration that is due to God alone because the faithful receive Holy Communion standing and, to boot, take it into their hands like any other food, grasping it with their fingers and placing it into their mouths themselves. There is here a sort of Eucharistic Arianism or Semi-Arianism.
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#2
So why not just say it's time to scrap the Novus Ordo and to go back to the Tridentine Latin Mass of all time?
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#3
Bishop Schneider is the greatest. We need to clone him and Father Rodriguez and have them in every diocese.
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#4
Wow! I feel very hopeful for the Church when I see something like this openly proclaimed by a bishop "in good standing". 
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#5
(03-14-2012, 04:45 PM)JayneK Wrote: Wow! I feel very hopeful for the Church when I see something like this openly proclaimed by a bishop "in good standing". 

Amen. Times are a-changin'.
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#6
(03-14-2012, 04:53 PM)Raskolnikov Wrote: Amen. Times are a-changin'.

No, they are-a not.  If the times were a-changin', he would have been made a cardinal (so he would have a chance to be elected pope), and he wouldn't be stationed in outer siberia.  He would be brought  into the Vatican for a key post (like head of the CDF).
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#7
(03-14-2012, 05:30 PM)Lavalliere Wrote:
(03-14-2012, 04:53 PM)Raskolnikov Wrote: Amen. Times are a-changin'.

No, they are-a not.  If the times were a-changin', he would have been made a cardinal (so he would have a chance to be elected pope), and he wouldn't be stationed in outer siberia.  He would be brought  into the Vatican for a key post (like head of the CDF).

There's nothing wrong with being an optimist now and again.
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#8
Quote:For this reason we need new saints today, one or several Saint Catherines of Sienna. We need the “vox populi fidelis” demanding the suppression of this liturgical rupture.

We need, um, traditionalists. Bp Schneider, the little St. Catherines have been around since 1965. Generally, they're ignored, maligned, and excommunicated.
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#9
Oh well.  The ancient Greeks would understand.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassandra
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#10
I dare someone to post this on CAF.
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