The Elevation -- ad orientem
#1
We Catholics who attend the traditional Mass (so-called "EF") know that during the Elevation of the Host and the Chalice it is Christ offering Himself as Victim (true Sacrifice of the Mass) to His Eternal Father through His priest who raises up the Host and Chalice.  And the priest has his back to the people, who are actually taking part in this Offering of the Sacrifice.

In the Novus Ordo Mass (so-called "OF") it's the other way around.  The priest elevates the Host and Chalice towards the people, as if the offering is to the people.  That's my impression.  It may quite well be that the priest has the intention of offering it to God the Father, but as would Christ be doing that with His alter Christus?

Now, I came across an article or blog somewhere sometime ago by a Catholic who has been attending the new Mass all his life and never been to a TLM until the day of his first experience.  He saw the significance of the ad orientem form.  And then also, he happened to attend a novus ordo Mass where the priest after consecrating the Host actually turned his back to the people and raised the Host facing East.  He did the same with the Chalice.  I'm not sure if the writer explained it the way I understood or if he meant that he attended a novus ordo Mass ad orientem.  I have to look for that article.  This issue just occurred to me and i thought I'd mention it.  I never heard of a vernacular Mass with the priest facing East (not even the Latin version does that).  I know it would go against the rubrics if at the Words of Institution the priest faced the people and then turned his back to them and elevate the Host towards the East.  NO priest is supposed to change anything in the Mass (bust they do it all the time anyway).
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#2
(03-15-2012, 08:56 AM)Vincentius Wrote: I never heard of a vernacular Mass with the priest facing East (not even the Latin version does that).  I know it would go against the rubrics if at the Words of Institution the priest faced the people and then turned his back to them and elevate the Host towards the East.  NO priest is supposed to change anything in the Mass (bust they do it all the time anyway).

It's statistically rare, but there are certainly Novus Ordo Masses that are celebrated facing East. Facing the people is an option, not a command.

Changing from one orientation to the other in the middle of the consecration, though, is unheard of in my experience.
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#3
This is the case at my local parish.  At the NO the priest is only facing the people during the homily. 
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#4
Ahh!!  The Novus Ordo's 11th Commmandment.........making it an option
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#5
I know a priest who says the NO Ad Orientam.  Also, in the missal prior to the new 3rd Edition, there was a point that gave the hint that the NO was originally meant to be Ad Orientam, and not facing the people.  I don't know if this was "fixed" in the new Roman Missal or not.
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#6
A forward facing elevation doesn't look correct to me either.  I even attended a modern church that had been built facing the opposite direction so that the priest could technically face "ad orientem", toward the East, while he faced the people at the same time.

I was under the impression that the primary purpose of the elevation is to show the consecrated Host to the faithful so that they may adore Christ who is now present.  In the traditional Mass, the priest has to hold the Host above his head to make it visible, and it makes it much easier for me to focus on just the Host (or Chalice).  When the priest faces forward, well, I have to look at his face, and it's a little distracting.  Also, they don't have to raise the Host as high, so it looks more casual, like "hey guys, look at this!"

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#7
(03-15-2012, 08:56 AM)Vincentius Wrote: We Catholics who attend the traditional Mass (so-called "EF") know that during the Elevation of the Host and the Chalice it is Christ offering Himself as Victim (true Sacrifice of the Mass) to His Eternal Father through His priest who raises up the Host and Chalice.  And the priest has his back to the people, who are actually taking part in this Offering of the Sacrifice.

In the Novus Ordo Mass (so-called "OF") it's the other way around.  The priest elevates the Host and Chalice towards the people, as if the offering is to the people.   That's my impression.  It may quite well be that the priest has the intention of offering it to God the Father, but as would Christ be doing that with His alter Christus?

Now, I came across an article or blog somewhere sometime ago by a Catholic who has been attending the new Mass all his life and never been to a TLM until the day of his first experience.  He saw the significance of the ad orientem form.  And then also, he happened to attend a novus ordo Mass where the priest after consecrating the Host actually turned his back to the people and raised the Host facing East.  He did the same with the Chalice.  I'm not sure if the writer explained it the way I understood or if he meant that he attended a novus ordo Mass ad orientem.  I have to look for that article.  This issue just occurred to me and i thought I'd mention it.  I never heard of a vernacular Mass with the priest facing East (not even the Latin version does that).  I know it would go against the rubrics if at the Words of Institution the priest faced the people and then turned his back to them and elevate the Host towards the East.  NO priest is supposed to change anything in the Mass (bust they do it all the time anyway).
Another way the the two differ is the fact that the priest, saying the NO, genuflects after showing the Host to the people while in the TLM, the priest genuflects immediately after the consecration.
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#8
During the elevation, I always think of Christ being lifted on the Cross, His gift to the Father. But I've always been weird, so there's that to consider.  :pazzo:
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#9
(03-15-2012, 02:35 PM)The Curt Jester Wrote: I know a priest who says the NO Ad Orientam.  Also, in the missal prior to the new 3rd Edition, there was a point that gave the hint that the NO was originally meant to be Ad Orientam, and not facing the people.  I don't know if this was "fixed" in the new Roman Missal or not.

My fiancee's Daily Roman Missal has notations whenever the priest addresses the faitful directly (such as, "peace by with you") that read something like "Priest now turns to face the people."
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