Co-Redemptrix
WISE not wiae..sry...phone post
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(08-03-2012, 01:37 PM)catholicschoolmom Wrote: sometimes I feel lucky to not be as 'intellectual' as alot of posters on this site  (no offense... just an observation) ....  I find it alot easier just to believe and not over analyze things.... just believe in my faith and strive to serve our Almighty Father in every word deed and thought... and repent whole heartedly when I fail. 

Leaves a whole lot of time to actually practice Catholicism doesn't it ?
:thumb:
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(08-03-2012, 01:37 PM)catholicschoolmom Wrote: sometimes I feel lucky to not be as 'intellectual' as alot of posters on this site  (no offense... just an observation) ....  I find it alot easier just to believe and not over analyze things.... just believe in my faith and strive to serve our Almighty Father in every word deed and thought... and repent whole heartedly when I fail. 
(08-06-2012, 07:20 PM)voxxpopulisuxx Wrote: There was ZERO things wrong with what cath school mom wrote. Only an overintellectual catholic could think there was something wrong. Blessed Jacinta is millions of times more wiae then steven hawking or carl sagan. Jesus thanked his father that he hid his mysterys from the learned and worldly.

I agree with the posters that Catholics can be over-intellectual, but some additional thoughts come to mind (not really arguments, just thoughts):

The Catholic Church includes both intellectual and non-intellectual saints, and appreciates both. St. Thomas Aquinas was certainly more analytical then St. Therese of Lisieux. God alone knows which one was/is holiest, but it is wrong to put down either one's way of thinking as being objectively distasteful.  The teaching of St. Thomas and the praise given to him in the Church on earth seems to have had a more obvious long-term impact than that of St. Therese. God desires some people to make an obvious impact in the world with their intellect, even though they may or may not be as holy or have as much silent impact as others.

Without the intellect, how would truth be taught and heresy be attacked?  Many modern Catholics (and the world in general) are under-intellectual - they go mainly by sentiments.  Error is spread by the misuse (and non-use) of the intellect.  Surely as traditional Catholics we should know this.

The intellect is a great gift, and God wants us to use it,  whether it is small or great.  Intellect must bow before faith, but also assists it: we make conclusions from faith with the use of our intellect.  Being under-intellectual may be easier, but it also is definitely wrong!  Sometimes striving to serve God in our thoughts requires us to be more analytical.  Thinking (and analyzing) can sometimes give us more thoughts for our  prayers - as it certainly did for St. Thomas, and many saints.

Of course a great intellect can be accompanied with great pride, and time can be spent analyzing that should be spent praying. But that is why God's grace is needed.  I think that it is a good thing to pray for those with great intellect, so that they may be truly humble and use their gift to serve God.
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Well, I don't think more intellectual attitudes are always bad in every case. As Gilson put it:
Quote:Thomistic theology opens up perspectives on piety and mystical contemplation which are exclusively its own and which are of inestimable value; for the removal of the God of Christian faith beyond every conceivable representation avoids the deadly peril of anthropomorphism, which has turned away from God so many excellent minds to which, under the name God, are offered finite objects that cannot be God and that are unacceptable to their reason. But this theology does even more. It offers for our love an unknown God whose infinite and inexpressible grandeur, defying knowledge, can only be embraced by love. The Christian religion admits of many different spiritualities; none is loftier than this one.
[/quote

Or even someone like Dom Odo Casel
[quote]
Theology becomes mystagogy, whose aim is to return to the primeval mystery. As such it remains ever connected in some way with worship, for it wills to be not simple abstraction, but the way to God. Theology and theurgy are part of the mystery.
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It would be easy to simply believe, but:  "There can be nothing more dangerous than those heretics who admit nearly the whole cycle of doctrine, and yet by one word, as with a drop of poison, infect the real and simple faith taught by our Lord and handed down by Apostolic tradition" (Auctor Tract. de Fide Orthodoxa contra Arianos; quoted by Pope Leo XIII, Satis Cognitum, n. 9).

And again:  "In order not to shock the ears of Catholics, [the innovators] sought to hide the subtleties of their tortuous maneuvers by the use of seemingly innocuous words such as would allow them to insinuate error into souls in the most gentle manner.  Once the truth had been compromised, they could, by means of slight changes or additions in phraseology, distort the confession of the faith which is necessary for our salvation, and lead the faithful by subtle errors to their eternal damnation" (Pope Pius VI, Auctorem Fidei, 28 August 1794).

Most importantly of all:  "Behold I send you as sheep in the midst of wolves.  Be ye therefore wise as serpents and simple as doves" (S. Matt. x., 16).
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So what do you say of this EWTN analysis trying to reconcile the unreconcilable.

http://www.ewtn.com/library/ANSWERS/FR89103.HTM
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Fr. Raymond Verlay, O.P.—of the Dominican Monastery in Averillé, France, and writer for La Sel de Terre—speaks at the Fatima On Demand conference:

Fatima and the Triumph of Mary, Mediatrix
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(08-07-2012, 12:32 PM)ggreg Wrote: So what do you say of this EWTN analysis trying to reconcile the unreconcilable.

http://www.ewtn.com/library/ANSWERS/FR89103.HTM
Who the hell is thomas storkch and why should anyone care?
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