The Song of Bernadette
#11
(05-11-2012, 07:57 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(05-11-2012, 08:34 AM)Filipino Catholic Wrote: i just watched this movie about the life of St. Bernadette Soubirous entitled "The Song of Bernadette" and it was amazing and a real tear jerker and soon found out that it one several oscar awards (hard to imagine that happening today for a catholic movie). Has anyone else seen it ? What do you think of it?

One of my all time favorite films. A GREAT performance by Jennifer Jones, her Oscar was richly deserved. She was raised Catholic but left the Church later on which is a shame but she really made a convincing performance.
A very apt comment from Ingrid Bergman:
""I cried all the way through 'Bernadette' because Jennifer was so moving and because I realized then I had lost the award," said Ingrid Bergman, who was nominated for an Oscar for her role in "For Whom the Bell Tolls" the same year Jones won."

C.

I could never understand why Jennifer Jones, Ingrid Bergman, and Richard Burton didn't become Catholics (good Catholics) after playing saints so well -  St. Bernadette, St. Joan of Arc, and St. Thomas Beckett.

The Song of Bernadette is definitely at the top of my list (along with the Man for All Seasons).
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#12
(05-11-2012, 08:13 PM)Doce Me Wrote:
(05-11-2012, 07:57 PM)Cetil Wrote:
(05-11-2012, 08:34 AM)Filipino Catholic Wrote: i just watched this movie about the life of St. Bernadette Soubirous entitled "The Song of Bernadette" and it was amazing and a real tear jerker and soon found out that it one several oscar awards (hard to imagine that happening today for a catholic movie). Has anyone else seen it ? What do you think of it?

One of my all time favorite films. A GREAT performance by Jennifer Jones, her Oscar was richly deserved. She was raised Catholic but left the Church later on which is a shame but she really made a convincing performance.
A very apt comment from Ingrid Bergman:
""I cried all the way through 'Bernadette' because Jennifer was so moving and because I realized then I had lost the award," said Ingrid Bergman, who was nominated for an Oscar for her role in "For Whom the Bell Tolls" the same year Jones won."

C.

I could never understand why Jennifer Jones, Ingrid Bergman, and Richard Burton didn't become Catholics (good Catholics) after playing saints so well -  St. Bernadette, St. Joan of Arc, and St. Thomas Beckett.

The Song of Bernadette is definitely at the top of my list (along with the Man for All Seasons).

Or for that matter why didn't Paul Scofield? In general, I guess they weren't as affected by their own performanceas as the rest of us were.
I know Bergman only did Joan of Arc to try and rescue her career after her scandalous private life (not so private) threatened her livelihood. Those were the days when the movie going public would indeed make an actor suffer for living in sin.

C.
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#13
(05-11-2012, 12:02 PM)Adam Wayne Wrote: Benno, the reason films like these are no longer made, and therefore cannot win Oscars, is due to Fr. John Courtney Murray and The American Proposition. Which of course was the full maturation of the Americanist Heresy. In it, he claimed among other things that Catholics were now fully integrated into the American Way and had assimilated.

He called for an end to boycotts as there was no reason to complain as we were now one big happy family protected under the umbrella of "Religious Liberty".

This American Proposition cut off at the knees the League of Decency which started in Philadelphia with a boycott of Warner Brothers Theaters by the local bishop in the 1930s. Because Hollywood was already making scandalous movies. Not only did the boycott work, but it actually resulted in Hollywood creating movies that catered to a Catholic audience. It was a culture war between the Catholics and the Jews in which the Catholics won.

The League of Decency tried to go on, but besides Fr. Murray's mortal blow and the acceptance of The American Proposition, a movie came out in 1965 that ended it. It was The Pawnbroker starring Rod Steiger. He played the part of a Holocaust Survivor. There was one scene in which a woman's breasts were revealed if memory serves. Either way, the League was basically paralyzed as it could not find the courage to criticze the movie due to it's reference to the Holocaust. Around the same time that Fr. Courtney became the champion of TAP, a play came out portaying Pius XII as an enemy of the Jews and thus, without justification, started to receive the moniker of "Hitler's Pope". I cannot recall the name of the play, perhaps someone here can help me out.

Long story short, Hollywood eventually did what they wanted to always do. Produce low cost films with plenty of sex to reap huge profits.

Long story short, it still goes on and reached its zenith when the German Passion Play, I won't even attempt to spell it, but it begins with an O, was banned at Notre Dame, while the Vagina Monologues was allowed on campus.

But, yes, it is a wonderful movie. And I thought some might want to know the "why" behind the current mileau.

We cannot, and must not chalk the entire cultural rot to an inevitable creep in progressivism and taking the attitude that this is just the way things naturally evolved.

There were players involved and battles won and lost. We've been on the losing side for 52 years in this battle. But, life is short and eternity is forever.

I am beginning to contemplate the notion that Vatican II, can in part, be seen as suffering from the same paralytic seizure that took down the League of Decency in regards to the Holocaust. In particular the drafting of Nostra Atate and the warming up to the ecumenical approach as a way to lay dormant for a spell and not have the Church take the fall in anyway for the Holocaust.

Thanks Adam Wayne this was interesting.  I found the following when I was looking up some of what you said here.

A Brief History of the Legion of Decency (how the Catholic Church impacted Hollywood)
By Rick Kephart

The Legion of Decency was formed in 1934 to combat immoral movies. People took a pledge, in church, against bad movies. They pledged not only never to go to any morally objectionable movie, but never even to go to any movie theater that had ever shown a morally objectionable film!

This was very effective in discouraging Hollywood from making movies which would earn the disapproval of the Legion of Decency. And the Legion of Decency's ratings were very strict, much more strict than the modern Catholic Bishops' movie rating system (which has been sadly ineffective in influencing the making of movies).
Catholics used to be united, strong and strict, and then they were a powerful force to be reckoned with by the movie industry!

Around the end of the 1950's, things began to change. The emphasis was taken off condemning bad movies, and a deliberate effort was made to make The Legion of Decency more `positive'. The pledge gradually faded out of use, until it was finally completely forgotten.

By 1975, the Legion of Decency had ceased to exist. It was replaced by the Bishops' new Catholic rating system. That ended the Church's influence on the movie industry. Movie standards continue to drop. In researching the history of the Legion of Decency, this disturbing bit of information came up:

I called the library at St. Charles' Seminary for information about the Legion of Decency. Whomever I spoke to had heard of it, but knew nothing about the pledge. He looked it up in the New Catholic Encyclopedia, and told me what it had to say about the Legion of Decency.

In 1957, Pope Pius XII issued an encyclical called Miranda prorsus. The Encyclopedia claimed that the encyclical called for the Legion of Decency to be more positive, to put its emphasis on promoting good movies rather than condemning bad movies, and have more respect for people's consciences. In response to that encyclical (so claims this Encyclopedia) the Legion of Decency changed, very gradually (with no definite date). Eventually, it went completely out of existence, to be replaced by the rating system we now have.

I asked the person on the phone if he knew where I could get a copy of that encyclical, so I could read it myself. He said he thought it was most likely out of print.
But I found one, and read it.

There is nothing in the encyclical that could lead anyone to think he was calling for the Legion of Decency to change what they were doing! It not only vigorously condemns bad movies, but also immoral TV shows and radio programs. It would form a good defense for exactly what the Legion of Decency was doing, if it were considered honestly.

I doubt the author of that article in the Encyclopedia expected anyone to actually read that out-of-print encyclical to see if what he wrote was true.
People do tend to claim that Pope Pius XII said things which he in fact never said.
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#14
(05-11-2012, 08:33 PM)Cetil Wrote: Or for that matter why didn't Paul Scofield? In general, I guess they weren't as affected by their own performanceas as the rest of us were.

For what it's worth, I do know that Raul Julia reverted to Catholicism after playing Archibishop Romero.

Adam Wayne, the play you are thinking of is "The Deputy", by Rolf Hochhuth.
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#15
I have the Song of Bernadette on DVD - my children love it. Great film.

couple of other good ones out there are Francis of Assisi starring Bradford Dillman (although I didn't like the overtly romantic overtones between St Francis and St Clare the movie is overall pretty good) and The Reluctant Saint (which can be hard to find but is an excellent film all about St Giuseppe di Cupertino.
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#16
Yes, The Song of Bernadette is one of my favorite films!

The movie Therese is also very good in a spiritually uplifting way.
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#17
Monsieur Vincent is pretty good, too.
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#18
(05-12-2012, 02:05 AM)LongfellowDeeds Wrote: Monsieur Vincent is pretty good, too.

Yes it is.
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#19
Ironically, the author of the classic novel (Franz Werfel) was not a Catholic but a Jew, nor was the author (John Martin) who condensed the heavy tome into a more readable book.  Werfel had visited Lourdes on his way to escape the Nazis but could not leave France, and during his stay there he saw for himself the cures happening at Lourdes.  He made a promise that if he ever made it out of France and into the USA he would write about the girl who saw the Virgin Mary.  Werzel was faithful to the story as he met many who were close to the people who were witnesses to St. Bernadette, although Werzel was not above using his own judgment and admitted to using literary license to embellish on the story and added characters who were not in any way connected.  However, he wrote an addenda where he intimidated that he was close to becoming Catholic.  But for some reason, never did.

Quote: In my final years of school as my interest in Catholicism was being awakened, whilst rummaging through my parents' books, I stumbled across a Readers' Digest condensed version of The Song of Bernadette. Opening up and thinking I would merely read a few pages, my interest must have been immediately aroused, as I was not to put the copy down until summoned for dinner a number of hours later. Having opened this book again 20 years later, I again found the fascinating account of St Bernadette's apparitions of the Virgin Mary just as hard to put down.

John Martin who wrote the condensed version which I believe the movie was based on was not Catholic either.  I have the book, or had it or have it somewhere in this cluttered home I live in.

It must be remembered that the original author said that The Song of Bernadette is a novel, semi-fictitious (if that's what "novel" means) though it can be categorically placed in the annals of the historical account of the story.
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#20
(05-12-2012, 12:47 AM)LongfellowDeeds Wrote:
(05-11-2012, 08:33 PM)Cetil Wrote: Or for that matter why didn't Paul Scofield? In general, I guess they weren't as affected by their own performanceas as the rest of us were.

For what it's worth, I do know that Raul Julia reverted to Catholicism after playing Archibishop Romero.

Yes, and Jeremy Irons converted after doing "Brideshead Revisited" but I think he's a liberal Catholic.

C.
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