How do we develop Catholic sensibilities in children?
#1
i just read an article online wherein it tackles the question on how to teach children to love and live in a  way that their sensibilities are in tune with a Catholic culture in its broadest sense. I don't know, but i grew up with a Catholic family that is not very keen on "Catholic culture"(we did go to Mass every sunday). If I were to have children in the future how would i be able to make my children love Catholic culture?  Smile
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#2
Well, it shouldn't be too hard, since P.I. is a Catholic country, right  Grin
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#3
I believe this is the article you mean, Filipino Catholic:  http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/201...ities.html.  (The article itself is in dire need of a proofreader.  One real howler is the use of "unculturate" instead of "inculturate," which produces a rather humorous effect.  LOL)

It's a pretty solid start.  I admire the work of David Clayton, and especially many of his articles on the visual and symbolic grammar of the Catholic artistic tradition.  One wishes, of course, that someone so steeped in this tradition and so attached to its beauty would turn back toward the TLM and advocate its genuine aesthetic and theological merits over the NO.  The TLM and the aesthetic, liturgical, and epistemological culture that ramified from it enabled and engendered all the work he praises and studies; one wonders why he doesn't realize this.  This, too, shall come in time, I hope.

I would also add to this article that one ought to read good poetry to one's child and encourage the reading aloud of good poetry.  Mr. Clayton takes a rather impoverished view of poetry,* so perhaps it's to be expected that such practice does not make it onto his list.  The meters of English verse are likewise a means of ordering experience and reality that no less than music discloses a certain essential harmony of things.


*See http://thewayofbeauty.org/2012/03/the-ne...in-poetry/.  At least he admits the deficiency of the view; that still doesn't diminish its philistinism, I'm afraid.

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#4
(05-13-2012, 01:40 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Well, it shouldn't be too hard, since P.I. is a Catholic country, right  Grin

ahh yes of course! but sometimes when people seem to have something for so long they tend to ignore it! haha!!
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#5
Here's my advice, for what it's worth.

-Pray for them and with them.
-Make sure you live within driving distance to the Latin Mass.
-Teach them the faith.
-Love your Catholic faith, and they'll see it's important.

That's all you can do, really. If you can homeschool them, that's usually best. But don't do homeschool unless you and your wife can do an excellent job.
"Not only are we all in the same boat, but we are all seasick.” --G.K. Chesterton
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