Dalai Lama attends Pentecost Mass of Cardinal in Vienna
#21
(05-28-2012, 10:02 PM)JuniorCouncilor Wrote: Am I reading wrong, or does that say, "the doors, the doors"?  What on earth does that mean in this context?  I need a gloss on the text.

The minor Order of Ostaris, or Porter, has his role to see to the doors during Holy Mass. When these things were actually in use, after the chanting of the Gospel, before the Credo, catechumens and others who were not Catholic would be sent out of the Church for the Mass of the Faithful (hence the names Mass of the Catechumens and Mass of the Faithful). In the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, the Deacon still says at one point to attend to the doors, which is that to which the poster referred. I do not think most Eastern Churches actually remove non-Catholics (or 'Orthodox,' as it were) at this point.
Reply
#22
I don't know if this is something to be angry about, but seeing that picture of the Lama praying in front of the image of Our Lord was kind of touching. I pray that he converts to the True Faith, he seems like a very good man. I remember seeing him on television, answering the newscaster by saying that of course he believed the homosexual acts are intrinsically immoral. The interviewer was visible shocked; evidently the pedestal Westerners put him on made them think he would be more "enlightened" than that. As an aside, his conversion would be a scandal to many who have written off the Catholic Faith and may open minds and hearts worldwide.

:pray:
Reply
#23
(05-29-2012, 01:56 PM)Richard C Wrote: I don't know if this is something to be angry about, but seeing that picture of the Lama praying in front of the image of Our Lord was kind of touching. I pray that he converts to the True Faith, he seems like a very good man. I remember seeing him on television, answering the newscaster by saying that of course he believed the homosexual acts are intrinsically immoral. The interviewer was visible shocked; evidently the pedestal Westerners put him on made them think he would be more "enlightened" than that. As an aside, his conversion would be a scandal to many who have written off the Catholic Faith and may open minds and hearts worldwide.

:pray:

I agree.
The fact he visited several catholic shrines before and  that he wanted to attend only the first part of the mass looks as if he was much attracted by our catholic faith. The Spirit blows where he wants. And of course He always blows in the good direction.
Reply
#24
Tibetan Buddhism is completely in accord with ecumenism. The Dalai Lama probably sees our Lord as an incarnation of Avalokitesvara, as he himself is believed to be by traditional Tibetan BUddhists. Do ask why.
Reply
#25
There is a book out that has a bunch of conversations in it between the Dalai Lama and some ultra ecumenist Catholics. I don't remember what it was called though. Weird as it may seem my journey to the Faith was marked by actually reading books like that. Perhaps the presence of the Dalai Lama in a Catholic Church will spark interest in Catholicism on the part of Buddhists, be they ethnic Buddhists born into it or Western style converts.
Reply
#26
(05-28-2012, 06:33 PM)Gillibrand Wrote: Pictures of the Dalai Lama, robbed and in choir :Hmm: :shame:

## Unbelievers can attend Christian services - St.Paul takes this for granted in 1 Cor.14. It's led to conversions before now. But for unbelievers to participate[b] in that way, as though they were believers ? That seems to go too far, for all sorts of reasons. [/b]
Reply
#27
(05-29-2012, 10:30 AM)MRose Wrote:
(05-28-2012, 10:02 PM)JuniorCouncilor Wrote: Am I reading wrong, or does that say, "the doors, the doors"?  What on earth does that mean in this context?  I need a gloss on the text.

The minor Order of Ostaris, or Porter, has his role to see to the doors during Holy Mass. When these things were actually in use, after the chanting of the Gospel, before the Credo, catechumens and others who were not Catholic would be sent out of the Church for the Mass of the Faithful (hence the names Mass of the Catechumens and Mass of the Faithful). In the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, the Deacon still says at one point to attend to the doors, which is that to which the poster referred. I do not think most Eastern Churches actually remove non-Catholics (or 'Orthodox,' as it were) at this point.


Still happens in Greek monasteries. In fact if you're not at least a catechumen you're not allowed in the nave at all during services.
Reply
#28
What is the Dalai Lama's position on abortion and "gay marriage"?
Reply
#29
(05-29-2012, 10:30 AM)MRose Wrote:
(05-28-2012, 10:02 PM)JuniorCouncilor Wrote: Am I reading wrong, or does that say, "the doors, the doors"?  What on earth does that mean in this context?  I need a gloss on the text.

The minor Order of Ostaris, or Porter, has his role to see to the doors during Holy Mass. When these things were actually in use, after the chanting of the Gospel, before the Credo, catechumens and others who were not Catholic would be sent out of the Church for the Mass of the Faithful (hence the names Mass of the Catechumens and Mass of the Faithful). In the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, the Deacon still says at one point to attend to the doors, which is that to which the poster referred. I do not think most Eastern Churches actually remove non-Catholics (or 'Orthodox,' as it were) at this point.

So are ushers the modern day Porters? And I also have to ask: What is the traditional practice regarding non Catholics at Mass? Are they really supposed to leave?
Reply
#30
(05-29-2012, 07:09 PM)Heinrich Wrote:
(05-29-2012, 10:30 AM)MRose Wrote:
(05-28-2012, 10:02 PM)JuniorCouncilor Wrote: Am I reading wrong, or does that say, "the doors, the doors"?  What on earth does that mean in this context?  I need a gloss on the text.

The minor Order of Ostaris, or Porter, has his role to see to the doors during Holy Mass. When these things were actually in use, after the chanting of the Gospel, before the Credo, catechumens and others who were not Catholic would be sent out of the Church for the Mass of the Faithful (hence the names Mass of the Catechumens and Mass of the Faithful). In the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, the Deacon still says at one point to attend to the doors, which is that to which the poster referred. I do not think most Eastern Churches actually remove non-Catholics (or 'Orthodox,' as it were) at this point.

So are ushers the modern day Porters? And I also have to ask: What is the traditional practice regarding non Catholics at Mass? Are they really supposed to leave?


That depends on what you define as "traditional." If you mean, as most of you tend to do, from Trent till the 1960's then I don't know. It certainly was the practice for many centuries both in the East and West for the catechumens to be dismissed before the Eucharist. When that fell out of practice I don't know.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)