My Introduction Post
#11
Welcome to the tank.

On your leave from anarcho-communism, I recommend my book "Anthem 2012", which is free on scribd.com.  Enter the title in the search box.  It discusses the Church's teaching on private property, subsidiarity, and usury.  I also recommend the book from David Horowitz, "Radical Son".

What exactly is an Anabaptist?  I know the historical sect from about 400 years ago.  What does this "neo-Anabaptist" sect teach that differentiates itself from Southern Baptists and Reformed Baptists?
Thanks.
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#12
Quote:Welcome to the tank.

On your leave from anarcho-communism, I recommend my book "Anthem 2012", which is free on scribd.com.  Enter the title in the search box.  It discusses the Church's teaching on private property, subsidiarity, and usury.  I also recommend the book from David Horowitz, "Radical Son".

What exactly is an Anabaptist?  I know the historical sect from about 400 years ago.  What does this "neo-Anabaptist" sect teach that differentiates itself from Southern Baptists and Reformed Baptists?

Anabaptists have been around since their sect began during the reformation, in the form of the Mennonites, Amish, Hutterites, and some of the denominations and congregations that refer to themselves as "Brethren." The most populous of these are the Mennonites, who tend to be much more modernized than the Amish (by which I mean they tend to be "normal people"). A professor of mine is Mennonite and has an ear piercing, if that helps any. Of course, there are some Mennonites who are more conservative, and look like Amish, but these were not the type I was involved in.

From the 60's and 70's onward, Anabaptism as an ideology began to have more of an influence in the world of protestant theology, partly because of the influence of John Howard Yoder's The Politics of Jesus, in which he argues that Jesus' life has direct implication to political and social ethics. This part is probably not too contentious anymore in protestant circles, but it was then. However, his exposition of Jesus' political views is a pacifist one, as Anabaptists have been pacifists since the beginning, a product of their particular application of Sola Scriptura to the sermon on the mount.

A further development of all this was Neo-Anabaptism, which essentially takes all the same sola scriptura arguments, but replaces distinctively Anabaptist pacifism with Gandhian nonviolent resistance. In effect, this means that what was once something at least respectable, albeit wrong--read about how the Amish responded to the draft, for instance--into a goofy Jesus-hippie-fest. From this arose the so-called "new monasticism," which is a protestant attempt a monasticism, in which everyone is allowed to be married, and, most importantly, there is no hierarchy. Also inherent in neo-Anabaptism is a resistance to "Empire" (another gay buzzword, this one intentionally lacking an article), and a weird conglomeration of conservative and liberal political positions, which can be taken to the extent of "Christian anarchism." Which is, in itself, an entirely different matter of discussion.

In short, Neo-Anabaptists are pacifists. They don't have specific churches, and have little to do with baptists (who themselves are unrelated to the Anabaptist). I hear that Neo-Anabaptists are much more similar to the liberal evangelical movement, but since I'm from the south, I have no idea what that looks like, as all evangelicals I've met are conservative.
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#13
Thanks.  Any Adamites in the group?
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#14
Hi.
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#15
What an interesting introduction!  It sounds like you will bring a fresh perspective to the discussions here.  I suspect that as you go on attending the TLM, you will find it harder and harder to attend the NO, even the decently reverent ones.  That is what happened to me.

I am looking forward to seeing more posts by you.
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#16
Hello and welcome - what a great post.

This is the sort of story that just underlines how Catholicism is the one true faith and that the Holy Ghost only works through the one true church.  Even despite the appalling abomination that is catechesis, passing on of the faith and evangelisation (or lack thereof) in the church, conversions still happen.  Deo gratias, because it's certainly nothing the church is doing right.
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