Serving a TLM
#1
I have never served a TLM  before, and I was wondering if anyone with experience can offer me any tips and suggestions. Are there any particular differences and particularities found in the tlms offered by the SSPX, ICRSS, and FSSP? Thank you.
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#2
I can't speak for the differences between serving a FSSP/ICK/SSPX Mass, but my son used this book to learn how to serve at our local FSSP parish:

[Image: howtoservelowmassprdimg.jpg]

I could probably serve if there was no one else available, but as of yet, I still have not served a Mass.  My eldest son started serving Low Mass when he was 8 or 9.  Once you learn the Latin prayers, the rest of the Mass doesn't seem too difficult.
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#3
(05-31-2012, 02:24 AM)HuskerTom Wrote: I can't speak for the differences between serving a FSSP/ICK/SSPX Mass, but my son used this book to learn how to serve at our local FSSP parish:

[Image: howtoservelowmassprdimg.jpg]

I could probably serve if there was no one else available, but as of yet, I still have not served a Mass.  My eldest son started serving Low Mass when he was 8 or 9.  Once you learn the Latin prayers, the rest of the Mass doesn't seem too difficult.

We use that book at out SSPX parish, too.
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#4
(05-31-2012, 02:18 AM)Christknight104 Wrote: I have never served a TLM  before, and I was wondering if anyone with experience can offer me any tips and suggestions. Are there any particular differences and particularities found in the tlms offered by the SSPX, ICRSS, and FSSP? Thank you.

You know me from the chatroom, but I thought I'd respond here, as well. :)  It's difficult to give tips and suggestions without a specific focus, but one thing that I find important is to always remain calm and collected, even when things are going wrong.  Think on your toes (with proper rubrical foundation, of course) for how to resolve whatever situation may arise, and then do so gracefully.  It maintains the reverence and prevents the faithful from being overly distracted.  And trust me, a lot can go wrong -- just read De Defectibus if you don't believe me!

For example, consider what you would do if, during incensation, the thurible were to go up in flames.  The ability to keep your composure in handling the situation, versus getting excited over the danger, can make a very large difference, and can distinguish a seasoned server from a novice.  (In this video, you see that they ignored the fire altogether and kept going!)

In Christo Rege,
    -Steven
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#5
Edit: I need to start reading more carefully.  :doh: :dunce:
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#6
(05-31-2012, 02:18 AM)Christknight104 Wrote: I have never served a TLM  before, and I was wondering if anyone with experience can offer me any tips and suggestions. Are there any particular differences and particularities found in the tlms offered by the SSPX, ICRSS, and FSSP? Thank you.

Wear comfortable black shoes that fit right. You'll be doing a lot of kneeling and genuflecting and it's been my misfortune because of shoes that I've almost slipped or sloppily risen from my place. 

When you kneel make sure to place the back and bottom part of the cassock over your shoes to cover them. I don't know why this is given as a direction (maybe so there won't be a distraction) but follow it.

Before you get vested go to the chapel and offer a prayer of thanksgiving for what you are about to do. A lot of young men would love to serve however they can't because they have no priest to offer the TLM.

You use your right hand to give and left to receive: wine and water cruets, barreta, etc.

Don't be nervous! 

Make sure you know the words by heart and go at the pace the priest has set

Do not ingage in any talk that isn't necessary in the sanctuary. It looks bad to the congregation, it makes you look silly, and it is irreverent.

Offer your help of you can to the sacristan.

Look over th words before you go to sleep on the eve of your serving and after you wake up if you can remember to

Ask the priest for tips I'm sure he'd be happy to tell you

And do whatever he tells you. I cannot stress that enough. When I first started serving that was engrained into my head by the older altar boys

If you are acolyte II you'll be in charge of the water at the offertory, the lavabo and the washing of the forefinger and thumb after commuin. You will also be in charge of moving the gospel to the other side of the altar (the left side) stay up there until the priest pronounces the holy name or when the space of fifteen or ten seconds has passed.

You probably won't be asked to be acolyte I yet because of the bells and because you are just starting off

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#7
I remember reading this page when I was first learning: http://www.traditio.com/office/serving.txt  (Overlook the hosting website!)  It has good commentary, but also contains prayers you can say whilst vesting:
Quote:For the Cassock:
Dominus, pars haereditatis meae, et calicis mei:  tu es, qui restitues hereditatem meam mihi.
O Lord, the portion of my inheritance, and my chalice:  You are He who will restore my inheritance to me.

For the Surplice:
Indue me, Domine, novum hominem, qui secundum Deum creatus est in iustitia et sanctitate veritatis.  Amen.
Invest me, O Lord, as a new man, who was created by God in justice and the holiness of truth.  Amen.


(05-31-2012, 12:34 PM)Josué Wrote: When you kneel make sure to place the back and bottom part of the cassock over your shoes to cover them. I don't know why this is given as a direction (maybe so there won't be a distraction) but follow it.

Be sure not look over your shoulder when doing so, though, nor spend too much time adjusting it.  The benefit of having a tidy cassock can be outweighed by the distraction caused by either of those.  However, before standing up, be sure at least that your cassock is not snagged under your feet, otherwise it can cause you to stumble or trip!
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#8
I think Josue just gave some good pointers.  In my case,  my first Mass to serve was a Saturday low Mass at a convent chapel.  I was fortunate to have a partner.  He was able to carry me if trouble arose.  Not much did, but it is a good thing to start with a partner, or if not, then on a day with not so many people present, especially if you are one he is liable to get nervous.
 Do your best to memorise your responses and movements.  Most  priests do not mind novice servers to use a card as an aid.  
 Like some of the writers say in their instruction, we are not in a military drill in the sanctuary.  Be dignified, but not rigid.  Like others have said, no talking, but an instance can arise that Fr or another server says something to you in a low voice(especially when nearby) so be ready at all times to listen well.  Like I have heard said, if you make a mistake, carry on, but do your best to make the mistake almost not noticeable.
 I would recommend, besides the booklet on serving already recommended(which I used to learn from), one reprinted by Tan Books "How To Serve in Simple, Solemn, and Pontifical Functions".  It was first published in 1934 and was compiled by Dom Matthew Britt, O.S.B.  Besides low Mass, with one or two servers, it covers cantata's, Solemn, and Pontifical functions, vespers, etc.  It is only around $13.00 and fortifies and fills in the gap in some areas.  
 Serving the 62' is pretty much the same as serving at the "58" or "54" missal, save the Confiteor issue and the transference for the Last Gospel when a proper Gospel applies.
Pray to St John Berchmann's and your guardian anglel for the guidance in this endeavor.

Joe
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#9
(05-31-2012, 12:58 PM)Steven Wrote: I remember reading this page when I was first learning: http://www.traditio.com/office/serving.txt  (Overlook the hosting website!)  It has good commentary, but also contains prayers you can say whilst vesting:
Quote:For the Cassock:
Dominus, pars haereditatis meae, et calicis mei:  tu es, qui restitues hereditatem meam mihi.
O Lord, the portion of my inheritance, and my chalice:  You are He who will restore my inheritance to me.

For the Surplice:
Indue me, Domine, novum hominem, qui secundum Deum creatus est in iustitia et sanctitate veritatis.  Amen.
Invest me, O Lord, as a new man, who was created by God in justice and the holiness of truth.  Amen.


(05-31-2012, 12:34 PM)Josué Wrote: When you kneel make sure to place the back and bottom part of the cassock over your shoes to cover them. I don't know why this is given as a direction (maybe so there won't be a distraction) but follow it.

Be sure not look over your shoulder when doing so, though, nor spend too much time adjusting it.  The benefit of having a tidy cassock can be outweighed by the distraction caused by either of those.  However, before standing up, be sure at least that your cassock is not snagged under your feet, otherwise it can cause you to stumble or trip!

Yes!  You're quite right about that. I usually just move Tito the side in one movement befor getting up
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#10
I found learning the server responses to be very easy by listening to / responding with audio recordings of the preparatory prayers, etc.  I downloaded MP3's from Santa Missa and played them in my car.  I had the responses down pat in just a few days.

Though I no longer need it, I used to keep a photocopy of the "Table of Contents" for the Mass tucked in the sleeve pocket of my cassock.  That way if I got anxious or confused about what was coming next, I could discretely pull that out and put myself at ease.

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