Reading leaked documents
#11
But it is clear that we probably do not need to read a particular document, therefore, it is safest to abstain.
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#12
Rosarium, I listened to that sermon on curiosity and it's crystal clear to me that no leaked document could possibly be ok to read.  We're obliged to learn what's necessary for our state in life, and nothing more.  Thanks for that. 

I reject the argument that it might be pertinent to us, therefore it's ok.  It sounds like the necessity argument gone amuck.  There's an inherent lack of faith in God's Providence in that. 
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#13
Example: I watch the leaked video from Wikileaks of the kids and AP journalist getting mowed down, the tank running over the dead body, and the helicopter pilots laughing and what-not. Was it moral to leak it? Did it bring a new perspective on the wars over there and the quality of some military men? Did it force the military to discipline their wayward men? Did it have a positive effect on the public's stance on the war? Did it do me any good at all? Could the potential good justify the leak? There are always a lot of questions involved. And probably a problem is the expectation that anything is secret anymore. The last bastion of secrecy is being anonymous on Fish Eaters!
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#14
(06-05-2012, 11:26 AM)per_passionem_eius Wrote: Rosarium, I listened to that sermon on curiosity and it's crystal clear to me that no leaked document could possibly be ok to read.  We're obliged to learn what's necessary for our state in life, and nothing more.  Thanks for that. 

I reject the argument that it might be pertinent to us, therefore it's ok.  It sounds like the necessity argument gone amuck.  There's an inherent lack of faith in God's Providence in that. 

I suppose one could state, according to what I wrote, that a document that is "leaked" that is allowable would in fact not be leaked in that sense.

So, what is by nature a public document, which is illegally hidden, could be "leaked", but it would not in fact be a "leaked" document any more than stolen property is not still the property of the owner.

But such documents are called "leaked" in the media.
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#15
Curiousity killed the cat.  But for a while I was a suspect.

If you want to keep a secret don't tell anyone.

People are always going to read leaked documents and always going to lead things that they believe are in the public interest.

It's idealistic nonsense to think they won't.  Once they've read them, if they are of any consequence they'll discuss them.  So you'll find out anyway if you interact with that group.
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#16
(06-14-2012, 05:42 PM)ggreg Wrote: People are always going to read leaked documents and always going to lead things that they believe are in the public interest.
So? People are always going to sin grievously too.

Quote:It's idealistic nonsense to think they won't. 
Who thinks they won't? This is about the correct course of action, not the most probable or popular.

Quote:Once they've read them, if they are of any consequence they'll discuss them.  So you'll find out anyway if you interact with that group.
This is a novel approach to moral theology. Very fatalistic.
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#17
For people to be free information needs to be free.

The Report from Iron Mountain was leaked too.  Would you prefer it if everyone just went obediently into the gas ovens or slave camps?

Secrets are just a way for an elite to maintain control.
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#18
(06-15-2012, 10:02 AM)ggreg Wrote: For people to be free information needs to be free.
This is an illogical defense. Freedom was never a virtue or a requirement. You cannot appeal to freedom in this discussion of morals.

Quote:The Report from Iron Mountain was leaked too.  Would you prefer it if everyone just went obediently into the gas ovens or slave camps?
That report is doubted, and is not well known. It is possibly not even leaked, but fabricated.


Quote:Secrets are just a way for an elite to maintain control.
The prince of this world is not our prince.
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