The church of Nice has to go!
#31
Well, I suppose Voris and company could pull an SSPX-like temper tantrum and start down-talking the Bishop, but that would undercut their Apostolate as being worth a darn.

Work with, not outside of. When you start working outside of, it's called an attack, even if it's "inside".

The Franciscans are big on this concept. Pope St. Pius X was a Franciscan. I personally think he'd be utterly appalled at some of the people who use his name and writings the way they do, and I'm not talking about the clerics of the Society, but the pew warmers.

It really doesn't matter in the end, as ChurchMilitantTV are doing what they do and the name doesn't matter since it's changed.

They will continue to do good work while others just talk crap on them.
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#32
Pope St. Pius X was not a Franciscan....
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#33
(06-25-2012, 09:19 PM)GloriaPatri Wrote: Pope St. Pius X was not a Franciscan....

Tell that to the Franciscans:

http://secularfranciscans.org/f8_12.html

It's like a shooting fish in a barrel around here.

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#34
Jon...
St. Pius X. was no Franciscan.
Huh?
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#35
(06-25-2012, 09:08 PM)GloriaPatri Wrote: Well I could see how a weak-willed, sheltered bishop could be deceived by his own staff, but I don't know which bishop this is so I shall refrain from judgement as a matter of prudence.

Weak-willed, sheltered bishops don't get appointed.  Or, if they do, it astounds me how they could pull off even being consecrated, unless he's a puppet or a shill.  

Also, I don't buy this "bishop as ignorant".  You don't get tossed accidentally into a position of power, much less an archdiocese!  And Detroit, at that.  It's still a major metro city.
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#36
(06-25-2012, 09:21 PM)jonbhorton Wrote:
(06-25-2012, 09:19 PM)GloriaPatri Wrote: Pope St. Pius X was not a Franciscan....

Tell that to the Franciscans:

http://secularfranciscans.org/f8_12.html

It's like a shooting fish in a barrel around here.
(06-25-2012, 09:23 PM)GottmitunsAlex Wrote: Jon...
St. Pius X. was no Franciscan.
Huh?

Third Order. AKA Franciscan. He wasn't a professed full on Religious like a OFM or something. But he was a Franciscan.
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#37
(06-25-2012, 05:38 PM)jonbhorton Wrote: Military imagery makes it more obvious for what it is. Hint: check out the Centurion's declaration of faith as regards his position and power vs that of Christ.

Where are you going with this, jonbhorton?
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#38
(06-26-2012, 12:41 AM)Might_4_Right Wrote:
(06-25-2012, 05:38 PM)jonbhorton Wrote: Military imagery makes it more obvious for what it is. Hint: check out the Centurion's declaration of faith as regards his position and power vs that of Christ.

Where are you going with this, jonbhorton?

St. Luke Chapter 7:

Quote:<< Luke 7 >>
Douay-Rheims Bible
1 AND when he had finished all his words in the hearing of the people, he entered into Capharnaum.

2 And the servant of a certain centurion, who was dear to him, being sick, was ready to die. 3 And when he had heard of Jesus, he sent unto him the ancients of the Jews, desiring him to come and heal his servant. 4 And when they came to Jesus, they besought him earnestly, saying to him: He is worthy that thou shouldest do this for him. 5 For he loveth our nation; and he hath built us a synagogue. 6 And Jesus went with them. And when he was now not far from the house, the centurion sent his friends to him, saying: Lord, trouble not thyself; for I am not worthy that thou shouldest enter under my roof. 7 For which cause neither did I think myself worthy to come to thee; but say the word, and my servant shall be healed. 8 For I also am a man subject to authority, having under me soldiers: and I say to one, Go, and he goeth; and to another, Come, and he cometh; and to my servant, Do this, and he doth it. 9 Which Jesus hearing, marvelled: and turning about to the multitude that followed him, he said: Amen I say to you, I have not found so great faith, not even in Israel. 10 And they who were sent, being returned to the house, found the servant whole who had been sick.

The centurion had faith. He understood his faith, and the fact that he was very unworthy to have Jesus enter under his roof. This is such a profound statement by a man with not a single reason to believe in Christ, especially as a Centurion, that it was paraphrased into the Mass. Remember right before everyone goes up to receive Holy Communion? Domine, non sum dignus, ut intres sub tectum meum, sed tantum dic verbo, et sanabitur anima mea (I know I'm missing the accent marks, but I have no idea where those are in the keyboard features )

Either way, he was ascribing military knowledge to the power of Christ. Now, we can't forget that we are the Church Militant (I swear, I'm not a total Voris geek, it's just weird timing for these arguments to come up). As such, we are, in effect, Soldiers. Ever heard the little Sunday School song, "I'm in the Lord's Army"? " ... I may never march in the infantry, shoot the artillery, fly o'er the enemy, I may never ride in the cavalry, but I'm in the Lord's Army, yes sir! ... "

Well, Christ commands that. Now, as such, this being a spiritual army, we don't typically start slaying bodies until all's on the downside. And even then, the Pope has to approve it. I don't see that happening anytime soon, but who knows?

Now, in the military, especially the Roman military, it runs down hill if you catch my drift. If it runs up, so help you the gods. Generally unfavorable to one's love of being pain-free and alive. In the military, one does not change a thing by helping the enemy. That can mean being "nice" or it can mean pulling a Mai Lai. Either way, the enemy benefits.

Right now is not a good time to be wishy-washy, nor so hard-nosed that people either learn nothing or, well, learn nothing good or true about what to expect in the Church.

It's guerrilla warfare. This method of fighting destroyed the Romans. The Celts would train giant wolfhounds, and raise them by the thousands. They were war dogs. They were mean as could be to anyone not theirs. The Celts, knowing they couldn't defeat the amazing structure of the Roman formations, nor the organization and steadfastness with which the Roman legions fought, the Celts simply released, as it were, "the hounds of Hell". Once the Romans had used their lances up keeping these snarling, angry, demonic dogs at bay, and had lost all sense of order form the panic induced by such a sight, the Celts would hit hard, fast, and then, when they wanted, split.

The Church is very Roman. Very organized. Very steadfast. Very strong. So the folks who want to defeat the Church are releasing their own dogs: Homosexual lobbyists, socialism, Americanism of a neocon flavor, 99%, 1%, 50%, 999, 666, 7/11, Husker du's and husker don'ts, etc. If there's a crack in the phalanx, rest assured the dogs are sniffing.

It doesn't help when amidst all the cacophony of just daily living, dogs, and our own horrible failings, we have people in the phalanx screaming blood murder about "Sux" Romana.

We're in a structured organization headed by Jesus Christ as Commander in Chief, King of kings and Lord of lords. There is protocol.

I'm sitting on an article right now that absolutely rips a not a few players a new one in regards the military chaplaincy, in contrast to the HHS mandate, with documentation and citing of U.S. law and Army regulations, and publications... but there's protocol.

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#39
(06-26-2012, 01:33 AM)jonbhorton Wrote: The centurion had faith. He understood his faith, and the fact that he was very unworthy to have Jesus enter under his roof. This is such a profound statement by a man with not a single reason to believe in Christ, especially as a Centurion, that it was paraphrased into the Mass. Remember right before everyone goes up to receive Holy Communion? Domine, non sum dignus, ut intres sub tectum meum, sed tantum dic verbo, et sanabitur anima mea (I know I'm missing the accent marks, but I have no idea where those are in the keyboard features )

Either way, he was ascribing military knowledge to the power of Christ. Now, we can't forget that we are the Church Militant (I swear, I'm not a total Voris geek, it's just weird timing for these arguments to come up). As such, we are, in effect, Soldiers. Ever heard the little Sunday School song, "I'm in the Lord's Army"? " ... I may never march in the infantry, shoot the artillery, fly o'er the enemy, I may never ride in the cavalry, but I'm in the Lord's Army, yes sir! ... "

Well, Christ commands that. Now, as such, this being a spiritual army, we don't typically start slaying bodies until all's on the downside. And even then, the Pope has to approve it. I don't see that happening anytime soon, but who knows?

Now, in the military, especially the Roman military, it runs down hill if you catch my drift. If it runs up, so help you the gods. Generally unfavorable to one's love of being pain-free and alive. In the military, one does not change a thing by helping the enemy. That can mean being "nice" or it can mean pulling a Mai Lai. Either way, the enemy benefits.

Right now is not a good time to be wishy-washy, nor so hard-nosed that people either learn nothing or, well, learn nothing good or true about what to expect in the Church.

It's guerrilla warfare. This method of fighting destroyed the Romans. The Celts would train giant wolfhounds, and raise them by the thousands. They were war dogs. They were mean as could be to anyone not theirs. The Celts, knowing they couldn't defeat the amazing structure of the Roman formations, nor the organization and steadfastness with which the Roman legions fought, the Celts simply released, as it were, "the hounds of Hell". Once the Romans had used their lances up keeping these snarling, angry, demonic dogs at bay, and had lost all sense of order form the panic induced by such a sight, the Celts would hit hard, fast, and then, when they wanted, split.

The Church is very Roman. Very organized. Very steadfast. Very strong. So the folks who want to defeat the Church are releasing their own dogs: Homosexual lobbyists, socialism, Americanism of a neocon flavor, 99%, 1%, 50%, 999, 666, 7/11, Husker du's and husker don'ts, etc. If there's a crack in the phalanx, rest assured the dogs are sniffing.

It doesn't help when amidst all the cacophony of just daily living, dogs, and our own horrible failings, we have people in the phalanx screaming blood murder about "Sux" Romana.

We're in a structured organization headed by Jesus Christ as Commander in Chief, King of kings and Lord of lords. There is protocol.

I'm sitting on an article right now that absolutely rips a not a few players a new one in regards the military chaplaincy, in contrast to the HHS mandate, with documentation and citing of U.S. law and Army regulations, and publications... but there's protocol.

I see what your saying, and I agree that orders should flow smoothly from the top down, and this whole playing nice with the enemy is just foolhardy.
Do you have any other suggestions on how the Church Militant might adjust its tactics to make them more effective in fighting this guerrilla war?
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#40
jonbhorton Wrote:It's guerrilla warfare. This method of fighting destroyed the Romans. The Celts would train giant wolfhounds, and raise them by the thousands. They were war dogs. They were mean as could be to anyone not theirs. The Celts, knowing they couldn't defeat the amazing structure of the Roman formations, nor the organization and steadfastness with which the Roman legions fought, the Celts simply released, as it were, "the hounds of Hell". Once the Romans had used their lances up keeping these snarling, angry, demonic dogs at bay, and had lost all sense of order form the panic induced by such a sight, the Celts would hit hard, fast, and then, when they wanted, split.

And which of the Celtic peoples, pray, ousted the Romans out of whichever territory, or won a lasting victory over them? The Britons, the Gauls, the Celt-Iberians?

In fact, of all the Celtic lands that Rome invaded, most of them still speak a Latin-based languge to this day.
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