Jesus had a Nervous Breakdown
#1
You just can't make this stuff up. It's hard to believe some of the things these renowned Catholic scholars come up with. These so-called scholars just keep chipping away and chipping away at Jesus, until there is nothing left of the Son of God the Incarnation and the Redeemer of the world. I can only imagine what they've been teaching in the seminaries.
I posted what I thought were the relevant parts of the article, you can read it in full at the following link:
http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/features...breakdown/

Jesus had a brief nervous breakdown

By Jill Duchess of Hamilton 21 June 2012

“Jesus had a brief nervous breakdown in the Garden of Gethsemane,” suggested Fr Jerome Murphy-O’Connor, the 77-year-old renowned expert on the New Testament. Tall, very erect, heavily built with a clipped white beard, “Fr Jerry,” as he is affectionately known, looks imposing even when sitting. Although he spoke with an air of authority, the idea of Jesus having a mental collapse after the emotional Last Supper came as a shock to me, as it would to most traditional Christians. But Fr Murphy-O’Connor, like his first cousin, Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, can present an argument persuasively.

“Scholars,” he said, “have come a long way from seeing Jesus as a lonely figure in a moonlight-dappled garden whose body and spirit momentarily rebelled.”

He emphasised the wide gap between recent research and how average churchgoers still perceive many events in the life of Jesus.

Expanding on the contradictions surrounding the diverse re-tellings of Jesus’s final hours, his suffering and extreme anguish of the Agony in the Garden, he added: “When realising the imminence of his own demise, Jesus was deeply distraught and troubled, out of control.”...

...The really fascinating pages are those which analyse the controversy over one of the most soul-wrenching episodes in the gospels, that is, Jesus’s prayer to God in Gethsemane. Fr Murphy-O’Connor even goes so far as to ask the question: “How do we know the words of Jesus’s prayer? If the disciples were asleep and they had no time with Jesus after he was arrested and before he was put to death, how does anyone know what Jesus prayed? Where is the source for the content?”

His answer came as a shock: “They made it up!”

This was the sort of remark one might hear from an atheist or a non-believer, not an august Catholic biblical scholar.

He continued: “The only possibility is that certain disciples projected on to Jesus the emotions that they imagined they would experience if they themselves suddenly realised their death by torture was imminent.”

The notion that the authors of the gospels used imagination, and that their words sometimes only reflect a kernel of the historical truth, was difficult to grasp. As he sat at his neat desk, Fr Murphy-O’Connor spoke of the intensely human Jesus revealed by Mark: “Mark stressed that it is a fully human thing to have a nervous breakdown if you are about to be tortured to death.”

“Young men and women in their 20s who had been in the company of Jesus would have been alive in the year 70. So even though Mark was writing 40 years after the death of Jesus, he would have had access to witnesses. We know that Mark combined two sources which, of course, must be earlier than the year 70.”

Halting to ensure that I fully understood what he was saying, Fr Murphy-O’Connor then spoke of how Mark’s second source is similar to the way that John portrayed Jesus at Gethsemane: always completely in control. “Presenting Jesus as a man who loved people and having compassion was no problem. But they didn’t like him having a nervous breakdown, being out of control. It proved to be more than other Christians could accept. Ignorance, they also tried to suppress.”


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#2
Ah..the "Catholic" Verbo-Maniacs strike again. Que the apologists who will soon tell us what was "really" meant here.
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#3
Luckily,his kind is dying off ...

I wonder if he even believes Jesus rose physically from the dead?

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#4
He's no big deal compared tour ex-Father Dominic Crossen, that guy is crazy. He once said even if Christ did not rise from the dead I'd still believe in Christianity. I assume he meant it as a philosophical construct. Not me, if Christ didn't rise from the dead I'm joining the Mafia, booze, broads, and murder woud be my philosophy.

tim
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#5
(06-25-2012, 10:47 AM)Tim Wrote: He's no big deal compared tour ex-Father Dominic Crossen, that guy is crazy. He once said even if Christ did not rise from the dead I'd still believe in Christianity. I assume he meant it as a philosophical construct. Not me, if Christ didn't rise from the dead I'm joining the Mafia, booze, broads, and murder woud be my philosophy.

tim

I know who you're talking about, he's that ex-Catholic priest who said that Jesus’s dead body was dumped into a common grave, and eaten by dogs. He's one of the liberals favorites.
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#6
Exactly!  If Christ did not rise from the dead, Christianity would be among all the other false religions.



(06-25-2012, 10:47 AM)Tim Wrote: He's no big deal compared tour ex-Father Dominic Crossen, that guy is crazy. He once said even if Christ did not rise from the dead I'd still believe in Christianity. I assume he meant it as a philosophical construct. Not me, if Christ didn't rise from the dead I'm joining the Mafia, booze, broads, and murder woud be my philosophy.

tim
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#7
You just have to shake your head in wonderment when you see, hear or read utter stupidity coming from so-called learned men with licentiates in philosophy, theology and Canon law.  And then you wonder why you just keep on reading to find more philological discordance further on.

Of course we know who prompts these men with those anti-scriptural statements:  Christ's numero uno enemy, the devil.  Who else?  These men are not brilliant enough to think for themselves.  “They made it up!”  Duh!

Did Christ waken his three disciples three times and asked them to watch at least an hour?  Two of these men were Evangelists:  Matthew and John, who were there.  Perhaps the most terrible of Christ's torment and anguish during His Passion was the agony he underwent in the Garden, for he foresaw what was not only ahead in the following three days leading to His dearth but also He knew how much merit was there in the sufferings when only a few would be saved.  There is a medical condition that causes one to sweat blood.  This is what Jesus went through.

The only true witness among the Apostle of His Passion -- every single minute of it -- was St. John, who observe it all.  Notice how the Synoptic Gospels say that at the start of the Via Crucis the Roman soldiers had Simon of Cyrene carry the Cross to Calvary, but in John's Gospel, Christ carried the Cross for some length until he could no longer and Simon was made to carry it.  John was there in person.  And John saw Christ's actual crucifixion where the others had run away in hiding.  Of course the other only witness was His mother, but she never wrote anything, but much of the account of the Gospels, if not all, came from her.  As it's said, the Gospels were inspired by the Holy Ghost through Mary who was in His grace from the moment of her conception. 

"Mental collapse" and "nervous breakdown" -- what a hoot.
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#8
I think I know what these liberal Catholic scholars are trying to do, they want to downgrade Christ, to diminish his primary role as the sole means of salvation.
They are ultimately religious pluralists who believe that God is so completely unknowable that any religious system that claims exclusive knowledge is being narrow minded and bigoted, they believe that Christianity is just one of many equally viable religions that can be used to better people in this world. 
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#9
But what about the thread title. Did Jesus have a nervous breakdown?

There's got to be some truth between this........

Quote: As he sat at his neat desk, Fr Murphy-O’Connor spoke of the intensely human Jesus revealed by Mark: “Mark stressed that it is a fully human thing to have a nervous breakdown if you are about to be tortured to death.”

And this.........

Quote:Fr Murphy-O’Connor then spoke of how Mark’s second source is similar to the way that John portrayed Jesus at Gethsemane: always completely in control. “Presenting Jesus as a man who loved people and having compassion was no problem. But they didn’t like him having a nervous breakdown, being out of control. It proved to be more than other Christians could accept."

When the scriptures says Jesus sweat drops "like blood" does it mean he actually sweat blood?  I found this: Hematidrosis is a rare, but very real, medical condition where one’s sweat will contain blood. The sweat glands are surrounded by tiny blood vessels. These vessels can constrict and then dilate to the point of rupture where the blood will then effuse into the sweat glands. Its cause – extreme anguish.

Is it a sin to have a nervous breakdown? I don't like to think of Our Lord being "out of control" either.. but, what is extreme anguish? agony?
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#10
StrictCatholicGirl Wrote:Is it a sin to have a nervous breakdown? I don't like to think of Our Lord being "out of control" either.. but, what is extreme anguish? agony?

No, Lisa, it certainly isn't.

However, a mental breakdown implies instability and a momentary loss of one's ability to cope with present circumstances rationally. Agony or anguish is more an acute awareness on a physical and mental level of something causing pain, but agony does not imply any loss of one's mental integrity.

I find it hard for Christ to have possessed the potential of losing His wits, temporary or otherwise, as His intellect and will were not weakened by original sin.
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