Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul
#11
(06-29-2012, 06:49 PM)City Smurf Wrote:
(06-29-2012, 04:35 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Then you can have meat. Lucky.

I was going to have meat at lunch today until my father (non-practising) said "why?  It's Friday." and I was like "oh, yeah" so I skipped lunch :P.

You coulda explained to him that on HDO's, the penance is dispensed.
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#12
(06-29-2012, 06:51 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: You coulda explained to him that on HDO's, the penance is dispensed.

I could have if I remembered.  That's the point of why I skipped lunch :P.
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#13
(06-29-2012, 06:38 PM)Scriptorium Wrote: This feast has not been a holy day in the US since the mid 1800s. And even then it was not universally held. The US as we know it has essentially always had the same six holy days. The 3rd Baltimore Council set this definitively in 1884.

Thank you! So St. Joseph's Day has not been a Holy Day in the U.S. either? I assume that before the Revolution, Corpus Christi, Epiphany, & Ascension Days were Holy Days?
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#14
Sad to say, here in the Philippines the feast of Peter and Paul is not a holy day. We're down to Christmas Day, Jan.1, and December 8. However in England and Wales it is still a holy day!
http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/Calendar/Holydays.shtml

C.
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#15
M Rose,

Even before the revolution, the holy day were the same in the US. Now, the conciliar bishops "dispense" or "transfer" them to a Sunday.
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#16
(06-29-2012, 07:50 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: M Rose,

Even before the revolution, the holy day were the same in the US. Now, the conciliar bishops "dispense" or "transfer" them to a Sunday.

Right, that is what I thought. How "Pastoral" of them.
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#17
The Holy Days in 1858 in US (the earliest I know of):

Universally - Assumption, All Saints, Christmas

In some places: Circumcision, Epiphany, Annunciation, Corpus Christi

Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception was declared patron in 1846, but the feast was transferred to Sundays.
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#18
(06-29-2012, 04:21 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: I don't this solemnity was ever a Holy Day of Obligation in the US.

Things are probably different over there in PI, Vince, because of Spanish customs.

Phil, growing up here before immigrating to the States (I repatriated and am here now) there were 10 holy days of obligation and there was no such thing as moving the feast to a Sunday if it fell on a Friday or Monday (or Thursday!).

These were the holy days:


    1 January: Circumcision (now Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God)
    6 January: the Epiphany
    19 March: Solemnity of St. Joseph, Husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary
    Thursday of the sixth week of Easter: the Ascension
    Thursday after Trinity Sunday: the Body and Blood of Christ
    29 June: Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles
    15 August: the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
    1 November: All Saints
    8 December: the Feast of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary
    25 December: the Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ (Christmas)

Catholics today have it very easy, only three holy days observed on their Solemnities.  But how much grace are deprived from them?  Don't the bishops know how much grace is eqarned in one Holy Mass?  Or do they just want to eliminate the duty and obligation because they know people are not going to Mass anyway, so "let's them not commit a mortal sin."
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#19
(06-29-2012, 11:38 PM)Vincentius Wrote:   Or do they just want to eliminate the duty and obligation because they know people are not going to Mass anyway, so "let's them not commit a mortal sin."

I wonder how many average Diocesan bishops believe that to miss Mass on a Holy Day is a Mortal Sin?
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#20
(06-30-2012, 12:49 PM)MRose Wrote:
(06-29-2012, 11:38 PM)Vincentius Wrote: Or do they just want to eliminate the duty and obligation because they know people are not going to Mass anyway, so "let's them not commit a mortal sin."

I wonder how many average Diocesan bishops believe that to miss Mass on a Holy Day is a Mortal Sin?

"God's not gonna care if you only miss Mass."
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