The uncertainty of causes for canonization and intercessory prayer.
#21
(08-07-2012, 01:27 AM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(08-06-2012, 07:34 PM)Josué Wrote: The first story from the Decameron should be a good answer.  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23700/237...IRST_STORY

Of course, the Decameron was on the Index! :)

I thought so.
Reply
#22
(08-06-2012, 07:34 PM)Josué Wrote: The first story from the Decameron should be a good answer.  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23700/237...IRST_STORY

a) on the index, and
b) doesn't really answer the question, unless the person was actually infallibly canonised, the problems theologians have raised with fallible canonisations don't arise
Reply
#23
(08-07-2012, 01:38 AM)Norbert Wrote: lol.  Oh, the Index...anyway I think people might have gotten afield of my original question, since I wasn't asking about the infallibility of canonizations but the implications of fallible beatification.

Such as?
Reply
#24
(08-07-2012, 04:07 AM)TrentCath Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 01:38 AM)Norbert Wrote: lol.  Oh, the Index...anyway I think people might have gotten afield of my original question, since I wasn't asking about the infallibility of canonizations but the implications of fallible beatification.

Such as?

Prayer for miracles from possibly reprobate persons.
Reply
#25
(08-07-2012, 04:55 AM)Norbert Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 04:07 AM)TrentCath Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 01:38 AM)Norbert Wrote: lol.  Oh, the Index...anyway I think people might have gotten afield of my original question, since I wasn't asking about the infallibility of canonizations but the implications of fallible beatification.

Such as?

Prayer for miracles from possibly reprobate persons.

I don't really see the problem, one hopes such things would fizzle out, but when push comes to shove it doesn't affect the indefectability or infalliblity of the church as the pope doesn't solemnly command it nor is the whole church obligated to engage in it.
Reply
#26
(08-07-2012, 01:17 AM)Norbert Wrote:
(08-06-2012, 07:34 PM)Josué Wrote: The first story from the Decameron should be a good answer.  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23700/237...IRST_STORY

Where are these stories from?  And is the last paragraph saying that not only are canonizations fallible but that people in "perdition" can be intermediaries if God grants our faith in canonization as meritorious?  That seems, for lack of a more intellectual term, super weird.

I'm pretty sure it's satire.
Reply
#27
I'd say that asking someone who is on the path to canonization--but who has not been infallibly canonized--to pray for you is similar to asking a friend or relative to pray for you: He may do so, or he may not.

Whenever I ask someone who has died to pray for me, it's always someone who has been infallibly deemed a saint--whether by a papal decree (e.g., Thomas More) or by the universal belief and practice of the Church (e.g., the apostles Peter and Paul).
Reply
#28
(08-07-2012, 01:17 AM)Norbert Wrote:
(08-06-2012, 07:34 PM)Josué Wrote: The first story from the Decameron should be a good answer.  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23700/237...IRST_STORY

Where are these stories from?  And is the last paragraph saying that not only are canonizations fallible but that people in "perdition" can be intermediaries if God grants our faith in canonization as meritorious?  That seems, for lack of a more intellectual term, super weird.
.


The man who wrote it survived the black death and wrote it.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Boccaccio
It's just meant to be entertaining.  :LOL:
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)