Head of CDF on record: Four SSPX bishops should resign and close their seminary
#51
(07-04-2012, 05:55 PM)lumine Wrote: The SSPX has had no papal authority to administer any sacraments since Pope Paul VI.

Regardless, they've done a remarkable job of keeping their flock moral and leading good Catholic lives.

How have the priests with papal authority done?
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#52
(07-05-2012, 12:55 PM)ggreg Wrote: How have the priests with papal authority done?

Keeping us entertained at least...fiddling (guirtairng) while Rome burns

  [Image: com0410a.jpg]
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#53
(07-04-2012, 08:50 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Anyone deny the Pope is the head of the Church?

I didn't.
I didn't either.

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This Bishop's discourse is unacceptable, and even the Pope wouldn't say such thing about the four bishops. Anyway the Vatican hates Bishop WIlliamson in particular.
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#54
From Bishop Williamson's letter - Theological study of the consecration of four bishops in Econe - April 2, 1999

Quote:Notice however that whosoever disobeys in an emergency is disputing neither the authority nor its lawful exercise, but merely its unlawful exercise. He is not judging the lower law to be bad but merely inapplicable in the given emergency. Thus Archbishop Lefebvre contested the Pope's right to control episcopal consecrations not in general, but only in the particular emergency of the grave need of souls for the Society of St. Pius X to survive his own imminent death. The Church's supreme law is the salvation of souls, to which the law of papal primacy must, if necessary, give way. The Catholic's supreme virtue is charity, not obedience.

I like this quote.

And, he makes a good point. 
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#55
(07-05-2012, 04:18 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: From Bishop Williamson's letter - Theological study of the consecration of four bishops in Econe - April 2, 1999

Quote:Notice however that whosoever disobeys in an emergency is disputing neither the authority nor its lawful exercise, but merely its unlawful exercise. He is not judging the lower law to be bad but merely inapplicable in the given emergency. Thus Archbishop Lefebvre contested the Pope's right to control episcopal consecrations not in general, but only in the particular emergency of the grave need of souls for the Society of St. Pius X to survive his own imminent death. The Church's supreme law is the salvation of souls, to which the law of papal primacy must, if necessary, give way. The Catholic's supreme virtue is charity, not obedience.

I like this quote.

And, he makes a good point. 

  There are very traditional Catholics who wouldn't think of receiving sacraments from priests and bishops who have no authority from the pope to administer them. 
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#56
(07-05-2012, 04:53 PM)lumine Wrote:
(07-05-2012, 04:18 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: From Bishop Williamson's letter - Theological study of the consecration of four bishops in Econe - April 2, 1999

Quote:Notice however that whosoever disobeys in an emergency is disputing neither the authority nor its lawful exercise, but merely its unlawful exercise. He is not judging the lower law to be bad but merely inapplicable in the given emergency. Thus Archbishop Lefebvre contested the Pope's right to control episcopal consecrations not in general, but only in the particular emergency of the grave need of souls for the Society of St. Pius X to survive his own imminent death. The Church's supreme law is the salvation of souls, to which the law of papal primacy must, if necessary, give way. The Catholic's supreme virtue is charity, not obedience.

I like this quote.

And, he makes a good point. 

  There are very traditional Catholics who wouldn't think of receiving sacraments from priests and bishops who have no authority from the pope to administer them. 

[Image: 6a00e5505fc4968834010536e09336970b-800wi.jpeg]
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#57
(07-05-2012, 04:53 PM)lumine Wrote:
(07-05-2012, 04:18 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: From Bishop Williamson's letter - Theological study of the consecration of four bishops in Econe - April 2, 1999

Quote:Notice however that whosoever disobeys in an emergency is disputing neither the authority nor its lawful exercise, but merely its unlawful exercise. He is not judging the lower law to be bad but merely inapplicable in the given emergency. Thus Archbishop Lefebvre contested the Pope's right to control episcopal consecrations not in general, but only in the particular emergency of the grave need of souls for the Society of St. Pius X to survive his own imminent death. The Church's supreme law is the salvation of souls, to which the law of papal primacy must, if necessary, give way. The Catholic's supreme virtue is charity, not obedience.

I like this quote.

And, he makes a good point. 

  There are very traditional Catholics who wouldn't think of receiving sacraments from priests and bishops who have no authority from the pope to administer them. 
Who cares what they / you think?
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#58
Pope John Paul II, a speech on conscience.
http://www.ewtn.com/library/PAPALDOC/JP2RTCON.htm

Some snippets.

Quote:As we see from this quotation, conscience is a vitally important issue for every individual. It is our inner and also the of our actions. How important it is therefore for our conscience to be , to make judgements based on truth, to call good and evil, to know how—in the Apostle's words—to "prove what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect" (Rom 12:2).

Quote: means first of all, obeying one's own conscience in every situation and not silencing its inner voice, even if it is sometimes severe and demanding. It means working for what is good and increasing it within and around oneself, and never giving into evil, in the spirit of St. Paul's words: "Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good" (Rom 12:21). being demanding with oneself, getting up again after falling, being ever converted anew. means working to build up the kingdom of God—the kingdom of truth and life, of justice, love and peace—in our families, in the communities in which we live and throughout our homeland. It also means courageously assuming responsibility for public affairs; it means being concerned for the common good and not closing our eyes to the misery and needs of our neighbor, in a spirit of Gospel solidarity: "Bear one another's burdens" (Gal 6:2). I remember saying these words in Gdansk during my visit to Zaspa in 1987.

[quote] In the name of tolerance, a powerful intolerance, perhaps an ever more powerful intolerance, is actually spreading in public life and in the mass media. Believers are painfully aware of it. They notice the increasing tendency to marginalize them from the life of society: what is most sacred to them is sometimes mocked and ridiculed. [/quote

I find that last quote much more funny, considering traditional Catholicism.  Tendency to marginalize indeed....
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#59
(07-05-2012, 05:24 PM)JMartyr Wrote:
(07-05-2012, 04:53 PM)lumine Wrote:
(07-05-2012, 04:18 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: From Bishop Williamson's letter - Theological study of the consecration of four bishops in Econe - April 2, 1999

Quote:Notice however that whosoever disobeys in an emergency is disputing neither the authority nor its lawful exercise, but merely its unlawful exercise. He is not judging the lower law to be bad but merely inapplicable in the given emergency. Thus Archbishop Lefebvre contested the Pope's right to control episcopal consecrations not in general, but only in the particular emergency of the grave need of souls for the Society of St. Pius X to survive his own imminent death. The Church's supreme law is the salvation of souls, to which the law of papal primacy must, if necessary, give way. The Catholic's supreme virtue is charity, not obedience.

I like this quote.

And, he makes a good point. 

  There are very traditional Catholics who wouldn't think of receiving sacraments from priests and bishops who have no authority from the pope to administer them. 
Who cares what they / you think?

I'm not looking for someone to care what I think.  It is just quite ironic that so many people who consider themselves traditional Catholics hold the SSPX in higher regard than they do the papacy.
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#60


(07-05-2012, 05:08 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote:
(07-05-2012, 04:53 PM)lumine Wrote:
(07-05-2012, 04:18 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: From Bishop Williamson's letter - Theological study of the consecration of four bishops in Econe - April 2, 1999

Quote:Notice however that whosoever disobeys in an emergency is disputing neither the authority nor its lawful exercise, but merely its unlawful exercise. He is not judging the lower law to be bad but merely inapplicable in the given emergency. Thus Archbishop Lefebvre contested the Pope's right to control episcopal consecrations not in general, but only in the particular emergency of the grave need of souls for the Society of St. Pius X to survive his own imminent death. The Church's supreme law is the salvation of souls, to which the law of papal primacy must, if necessary, give way. The Catholic's supreme virtue is charity, not obedience.

I like this quote.

And, he makes a good point. 

  There are very traditional Catholics who wouldn't think of receiving sacraments from priests and bishops who have no authority from the pope to administer them. 

[Image: 6a00e5505fc4968834010536e09336970b-800wi.jpeg]

that picture goes for all sides in this discussion.....good pic, though....
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