Fisher More College Dean Dr. Taylor Marshall on EWTN
#1
Hello all,
I don't know if anyone got to see this, but Fisher More College Dean Dr. Taylor Marshall was featured on EWTN's "Journey Home" program last night. If you missed it, check out the rebroadcast dates! http://www.fishermore.edu/dean-taylor-ma...m-central/
Reply
#2
(07-03-2012, 05:44 PM)FisherMoreCollege Wrote: Hello all,
I don't know if anyone got to see this, but Fisher More College Dean Dr. Taylor Marshall was featured on EWTN's "Journey Home" program last night. If you missed it, check out the rebroadcast dates! http://www.fishermore.edu/dean-taylor-ma...m-central/

Among the many converts from fundamentalism, evangelicalism, et al., Taylor Marshall is one of the very few who left their protty baggage back home when they swam across the Tiber and wholly embraced the Catholic faith.  Many of the so-called converts turned Catholic "apologists" unfortunately still cling to their old but somewhat reconstructed, made-over faith.

Is there a transcript of the interview?
Reply
#3
There is a video of the interview going up soon on EWTN's website. I'll post the link as soon as it's available.
Reply
#4
(07-03-2012, 08:51 PM)Vincentius Wrote: Among the many converts from fundamentalism, evangelicalism, et al., Taylor Marshall is one of the very few who left their protty baggage back home when they swam across the Tiber and wholly embraced the Catholic faith.  Many of the so-called converts turned Catholic "apologists" unfortunately still cling to their old but somewhat reconstructed, made-over faith.

It's true; though I'd guess a "High Church" Anglican has a smaller theological gap to cross than your average Evangelical (speaking as a former protestant myself). I very much enjoy his blog: http://cantuar.blogspot.com/
Reply
#5
Dr. Marshall is an interesting guy.  I'd recommend searching for his blog.  He also has posted here on FE but I don't think he's a regular.
Reply
#6
The interview is now up on EWTN's website. View it here: http://www.ewtn.com/tv/live/journeyhome.asp
Reply
#7
iona_scribe Wrote:It's true; though I'd guess a "High Church" Anglican has a smaller theological gap to cross than your average Evangelical (speaking as a former protestant myself). I very much enjoy his blog: http://cantuar.blogspot.com/[/

Is he Anglican or Episcopalian?.  There is a difference.  It's not "high church" that makes the theological gap but,  it has been made evident it is the Anglican (perhaps some Episcopalians) who has some devotion or reverence for the Blessed Virgin Mary that makes him essentially "catholic" though not yet a convert.  Notice how very few converts grasp at the notion of revering Mary and it is about her that becomes an obstacle to fully embrace the faith.  Many remain "catholic" but retain cling to the protestant baggage they bring along with them.
Reply
#8
(07-07-2012, 02:22 AM)Vincentius Wrote:
iona_scribe Wrote:It's true; though I'd guess a "High Church" Anglican has a smaller theological gap to cross than your average Evangelical (speaking as a former protestant myself). I very much enjoy his blog: http://cantuar.blogspot.com/[/

Is he Anglican or Episcopalian?.  There is a difference.  It's not "high church" that makes the theological gap but,  it has been made evident it is the Anglican (perhaps some Episcopalians) who has some devotion or reverence for the Blessed Virgin Mary that makes him essentially "catholic" though not yet a convert.   Notice how very few converts grasp at the notion of revering Mary and it is about her that becomes an obstacle to fully embrace the faith.  Many remain "catholic" but retain cling to the protestant baggage they bring along with them.

In his conversion story, he refers to himself as a former Anglican priest, but also speaks of being part of the Episcopalian church: http://cantuar.blogspot.com/2006/05/my-c...-rome.html

The Episcopal church is the U.S. province of the Anglican communion, so maybe he just uses Anglican for simplicity's sake. I don't know enough about it to know which is more correct to say.  To make things more confusing, I know that some individual Episcopal churches have split with the U.S. Episcopal church and aligned themselves with different Anglican provinces overseas because of various theological issues; so they call themselves Anglican, even though they are in the U.S.  And I saw it advertised recently that there is an "Anglican Mission" church starting up in my neighborhood.  I don't have any idea what that means!  ???
Reply
#9
Regarding the terms Anglican and Episcopalian, there are essentially the same. Episcopalian was adopted in Scotland and America in order to drop the official association with the Ecclesia Anglicana (Church of England).

It was pretty tough for Anglicans during and after the American Revolution - the enemy was A/England. American Anglicans preferred not to bear the English identity (Anglican) and so were called Episcopal - which meant that they were the Protestants who claimed to have episcopoi (Greek word for bishops).

Globally, Anglican is the norm. In America, it's Episcopal.

However, in America, conservative Episcopalians in the last ten years have reverted back to the term "Anglican" to differentiate themselves from the liberal mainstream Episcopal Church of the USA.

When I was an Anglican clergyman, I would have called myself an Anglo-Catholic priest.

ad Jesum per Mariam,

Taylor Marshall, PhD
Reply
#10
That's a nice change.  Somebody turned up when we were talking about him and nobody was saying anything bad.  :grin:
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)