When was original sin removed from OT saints?
#26
(07-20-2012, 08:38 AM)Melkite Wrote: Aquinas was wrong about the immaculate conception, he is wrong about this as well.  He may be a very esteemed teacher, but there is no need to immediately presume he is basically infallible, when there is a more reasonable answer to a given question.  In this case, certainly it makes no sense that the faith of OT women alone saved them, but circumcision was necessary for females.  It was merely a symbol of baptism.  No cleansing took place by the circumcision itself.  This is readily apparent.

First, no reasonable person, let alone a good Thomist, would ever suggest that the Universal Doctor's knowledge amounted to an infallible or near-infallible theological cathedra. Yet, given his repute Universal Doctor, and that the Summa Theologica was the backbone of theological formation for the better part of three-quarter of a millennium, one had better be very well studied or have good reason to depart from St. Thomas' opinion. Generally, a layman, not trained in theology should avoid making any departure.

Secondly, St. Thomas was not "wrong" about the Immaculate Conception, at least not any more than most other major theologians of his era, like St. Bonaventure, St. Bernard, St. Anselm, Peter Lombard, etc. St. Thomas (ST III, q.27, a.1-2) treats the idea of Mary's Immaculate Conception ... but only in conjunction with fighting those who would say that therefore Mary was not in need of the Redemption. It is clear that St. Thomas taught and believed that Mary bore the debt due to Original Sin (for which she was redeemed by Christ ahead of His sacrifice), but not the stain. He seems to suggest that, like St. John the Baptist, she was purified in the womb at some point. Much of this is likely due to the mistaken idea that the body was formed before the soul was implanted, and since sin is not in the body, but in the soul, it was not until at least the implantation of the soul (the "creation" of this new soul) that there could be any cleansing from sin.

So there is an error here in St. Thomas' thinking, but it is not as if he saw the Immaculate Conception as impossible. He simply saw it as impossible, given his mistaken understanding of nature and generation. In fact, he effectively admits the principles behind the Immaculate Conception (Redemption of Our Lady, and he freedom from Sin).
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Re: When was original sin removed from OT saints? - by MagisterMusicae - 08-03-2012, 07:30 PM



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